The Sales Hacker Podcast
The Sales Hacker Podcast

Episode · 3 years ago

40. How to Lead a Top Performing Inside Sales Team at a Public Company with Amy Appleyard, SVP of Sales, CarbonBlack

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This week on the Sales Hacker podcast, we talk to Amy Appleyard, the recently appointed SVP of Global Inside Sales at CarbonBlack.  Amy walks us through her background from being an SMB entrepreneur to leading large sales teams and why sales emerged as her true calling. Amy combines raw intellect and analytical capability with a passion for sales resulting in an incredible and effective sales leader at a fast growing public company.

... Sam Jacobs. Welcome to the sales hacker podcast. Welcome back. It's really exciting to be in the heart of two thousand and nineteen. We've got a bunch of incredible guests that are lined up for the year and we've got today on the show Amy Apple Yard, the svp of global inside sales for carbon black. Amy is somebody that graduated from Undergrad with a theater degree. She's an entrepreneur. She started a bunch of her own businesses in the theater industry, then went to business school, had a family, joined staples advantage in the finance team and ultimately found her way to the sales organization, where she ended up running very large teams and doing incredibly well. And she's she's got a great mix of analytical and strategic skills coupled with people skills and she really cares about the teams and the people that she works with. She really sounds like a great leader and it was a real delight to interviewer and she's sort of a rising star in the Boston technology scene, in the Boston sales leadership scene. So I'm really excited about the interview. Now, before we get to the interview, we've got some sponsors. We've actually got a brand new sponsor. So the first is chorus dot AI. COURUS is the leading conversation intelligence platform for high growth sales teams. They record, transcribe and analyze business conversations in real time to coach reps on how to become top performers. With chorus DOT AI, more reps meet quota, new hires ramp faster, leaders become better coaches and everyone in the organization can collaborate over the actual voice of the customer. CHECK OUT CORUST AT AI forward sales hacker to see what they're up to. Our second sponsor is our friendly neighborhood outreach Dooh, the leading sales engagement platform. Outreach supports sales reps by enabling them to humanize their communications at scale, from automating the soul sucking manual work that eats up selling time, all of that soul suck. Don't get your soul sucked, folks, to providing action oriented tips on what communications are working best. Outreach has your back. So hop over to outreach dio forward sales hacker to see how thousands of customers, including carbon black are using outreach to deliver higher revenue per sales rep now, without further ado, let's go to the interview. Hey, everybody, it's Sam Jacobs and you're listening to the sales hacker podcast. Today. I am incredibly excited to have a the apple yard on the show. Amy Apple Yard is the svp of global inside sales for Carbon Black, a leading cyber security company specializing in next Gen and point security solutions, and we'll we'll talk about that. They just went public, but prior to carbon black, amy was VP of sales for log men's communications and collaboration line of business. She's been doing sales for quite a while. Before moving into the tech sector, amy led staples business advantages mid market sales division and she also had positions in finance, strategy and marketing at staples and then before that she co founded an entertainment based retail craft store and I also think she ran a theatrical lighting design firm based in New York. So we're really excited, aim me to have you on the show and thanks for joining us. Oh, thanks for having me. I'm a big fan of the podcast, so I'm honored to be here. Well, that we love our fans, so it's great. It's great to tell a star fan that's great. Okay, so we know your name, your titles. Officially, SVP global inside sales. I kind of read a little bit of the headline of Carbon Black, but it's always good to get sort of the overview from somebody that works there. So tell us in your words what carbon black does. Oh absolutely. So just a little background on the company. We are a cyber security company based in Walltham, so just outside of Boston. About a thousand people in total, a couple hundred inside sales reps, and were hovering it around two hundred million now, with plans to keep on growing, which is part of the reason why I joined and my team's help, to provide endpoint security solutions for it and security professionals. We actually serve customers of all sizes, so SMB, corporate all the way up to Fortune one hundred, but my inside teams focus primarily on the SMB and the corporate space. Wow, really? Yeah, so it's a it's a big, big division. We're pretty excited about it. Lots of growth opportunities and a carbon black. We really do believe that the end points are what needs securing. So this is the way modern dayside or attacks are happening and the solutions that we provide really do make it easier for defenders to protect the end points and then harder for the attackers to get in. So it's a really exciting space right now. It's a big total addressable market. There's a lot of folks out there doing similar things along the lines of hours, but we're pretty proud of what we've built and the customers were serving, continuing to innovate and just having a blast doing so. That's fantastic. And so you join just post IPO. Is that right? That's correct. Yep. And how big is your team? So we have about two hundred on the inside. So I have four directors, actually for female...

...directors. Cost a good job. Thank you for doing that. Happened before I came. It was one of those very impressive to me when I when I heard about it, coming in and learning about the teams. So it was definitely something that made my eyes kind of you know, I got pretty excited. And eighteen managers, so roughly half of our folks are strs who help not only the inside teams but also our field sellers. Lineup appointments and kind of get the conversation started with our prospects. And then the the rest are quota carriers. And so when you joined, was the team this big? Has It grow? I mean, I guess when did you join? Just a couple months ago? I just owned a couple months ago and they had just gone through big growth over the course of this year, this year two thousand and eighteen. The company is really invested in the mid market and continues to do so. So there's a lot of room for growth for us and all of these teams were built when I got here, but we're still on a path to growth. So we are definitely hiring and always looking for the best talent that we can find. That's fantastic. So we're going to dive into kind of your origin story, as we might call it in a superhero movie, but I'm actually pretty interested just in in what you just said. So you just inherited a very large team when you were leaving log me in and thinking about and coming to carbon black. How do you prepare for that? What sort of steps did you take to try and have, you know, the right level of influence around your your onboarding, your personal on boarding into the organization and how do you build, you know, influence and advocacy within such a large team as somebody that's sort of inheriting all of these hiring decisions? What's your strategy? What's your philosophy? That's a really good question. It was definitely a lot of you know, just we could have seemed like big, nameless, faceless groups of people right to get to know, but I tend to take a pretty personal approach anyway, and for me the goal was to do that as fast as possible. So I had spent time with the directors when I first came on board, and then also with the management team, just kind of telling them explain to them kind of who I was and what was important to me and what was important to me as a leader, but also just in terms of getting to know the company in the customer I tend to be somebody who really digs into the details, and it's not because I'm a micro manager, it's just because I want to really understand things and then once I understand it, I'm out. I'm back up to the three thousand or the ten thousand or the hundred thousand foot of view. So I asked them for help and getting to know their teams and understand, you know, their pipeline and everything that was going on with in the business as fast as possible and then set up just a series of round table discussions where small groups me with a manager and the team could be anywhere from eight, ten twelve people, and do a lot of going around the room just making sure that I understood who everybody was and how long they've been with the company. I had asked for the managers to each prepare a slide, like a facebook slide, pick just a picture of them and a picture of individual like the headshot type, you know, Linkedin type, picture of everyone on their team with their names and then just some basic contact information, how long they both the company, if they had moved internally. We do a lot of internal promotions here, from we do the SDR path all the way up to, you know, principle inside, inside sales rep and then one little bit of information like where they went to college or what their favorite movie was, because that little thing just helps me connect the names with the faces. And so I probably spent a good portion of my first month on the job just doing round table discussions and getting to know people and then I would off and, through the course of these conversations, ask what's your favorite product to sell or what do you you know, what's your favorite way to overcome objections? And this would help me get connected to the product. So that was one strategy, just for getting to connect the names to all of the faces, and then the other was to really understand the customers as quickly as I possibly could, because I think that's, of course, what we're all here for. So I tried to just fill my calendar, connected pretty quickly with the with our se team, our solutions engineering team, and said film my calendar with as many demos, POC's, everything as possible as you can, any space you can find, fill it, because then I would get the, you know, the benefit of not only meeting more of my sales reps and getting to know them on a personal level, but listening in on what the questions the customers were asking and getting to see demos of the products. So we do sell quite a few different things. We have a cloud based offering and there's a bunch of different blades on it and I needed to understand all of those things and that really helped me ramp up. If that, I think, answers your question. Yeah, no, it does. It's was. And did you feel how? I guess. I guess this is probably something that new you negotiate with the CEO or you know as you come into the organization, but you know, you were able to sort of say here's the cure, the milestones that I want to be held accountable to, and maybe it's like the first ninety days or a hundred eighty days really I'm just going to be in kind of market development, research mode and then from there we can figure out what the right targets are. Is that sort of how you approached it? Yeah, I always hear about those no fly zones, you know, where people can come in and they have thirty days or six days or nine days to just watch and observe, and I'm not...

...that kind of a person. So I do I would love to think that I could do that, but I just cannot sit still. So I had set expectations with our our COO, who I report to directly in our CEO, that I would I would listen and learn and observe and, you know, within thirty to sixty days I would just have some kind kind of a read out of what I was was seeing and where I felt like there were opportunities for us to either, you know, step on the gas or make some changes or tweaks to our sales process, etc. And after thirty days I had a readoubt for our executive team was able to say like here's what I'm seeing and here's where I think there's tremendous opportunity and and here's, you four, because so, by the way, we're in q for when I started. Wow. So so that was fun to try to figure that out fast. And then I also have worked in strategy and am able to, I think, just assess situations pretty quickly and kind of make a road map of here's what we need to work on and what here's what he is to go first, second, third, that kind of thing. So I was also doing that in the back of my mind as I was getting to know people and understanding our our numbers and what our growth strategies were and, you know, plans for two thousand and nineteen. So I was also kind of doing a little bit of that, like just my own internal consulting, like trying to figure out how to make the most of everything that we had and deliver more with everything that we have while that was happening. So I did that at thirty days and then I've just had been kind of March into that roadmap since then and we are closing in on the end of the quarter and super happy with the results. The teams are fired up and has gone rding. Today we had one young woman who just hit plan and that's pretty exciting right. So that is exciting. So for the listeners out there, were recording this on December eight teeth, which is my brother's Day. Happy Birthday Josh, and I guess there's you know, I've officially I mean, would you consider their to be like two at this point? It's the end of the day, Tuesday, so three business days from your perspective, left in there. Are you guys are pushing all the way to midnight on New Year's will go? We're going to the end? Yeah, we are going to the end. Will be in a little bit after Christmas and then we'll definitely be in that Monday. We're all gonna I actual I'm going to try to challenge people to just come in their pajamas or something good to make it fun, because usually I lay around on the thirty one in my pajamas all day and watch movies with my with my three girls and my husband. So I won't be able to do that this week because of where, you know, the thirty one falls, but it's worth it. I'll be with my with my new family here. Yeah, I mean, I won't have you'll be having fun and you guys are you guys are going to hit the number? Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, we will hit it. We are honest, vant test, on a path. Yep. So well, there's a so much I want to want to ask you about, but let's go. Let's rewind a little bit and go back to the days of feeder, which I mentioned in your bio. The listeners should also know that. You know, I went to the University of Virginia. Sadly, amy, you graduated from Virginia Tech. So we're not going to we're not going to hold that against you. Wow, how hookeys. Yeah, that's it. And you know, wasn't hasn't been a rivalry and football, at least for long enough that I have a like to stand on. But you came out and you're a theater major. Walk us through, you know, you obviously don't have to give us every single last detail, but it is pretty interesting how you've evolved from a theater major to running, you know, a sales team of two hundred people, where you just, you know, even even just in the last couple of minutes, you were you were really you are emphasizing how good you are in terms of like your ability to forecast and hit the number, but also rally the troops. So how did that? How did that happen, and how does theater inform what you're doing now? Walk us through a little bit of of the journey. Yeah, I will absolutely. It's I sound like a crazy person, I know, when as you just described me, but it actually all does make sense, or at least to me it does when I kind of thread the just kind of fill in the gap. So I was a theater major, but I also studied math and accounting and just loved all of that. I was, of always been pretty analytical within working in theater. What I was drawn to was lighting and theatrical lighting design, and there's a lot of organizational components to that. There's also a lot of voys. You it's almost like applied math in terms of figuring out how you use lighting, what light you use and in different situations and at what distance and stuff like that. So it was there was a definitely a technical side of it that was really appealing to me and it was also just a lot of fun and I tend to be somebody who kind of runs toward risky situation. So naturally, upon graduation I just moved to New York. I had never been to New York before. Well, once as a girl Scout. I grew up in North Carolina, so once as a girl scout when I was like thirteen. But there I was with a couple of suitcases and a thousand dollars in my pocket and trying to figure out like how to make a go of it. But I had a network of friends. We had bunch of handful of US had moved up and we found an apartment and just kind of sort of carving out careers. And for me what worked was I had done a series of summer internships during my time at Virginia Tech and so I had professional connections as well in New York and I had a couple gigs lined up and one thing kind of led to another and I ended up just really forming a nice career, very busy one, but...

...lots of travel, crazy lifestyle. Loved what I was doing and thought that I could do that for quite some time. But then I actually met my husband and and we got I met the man who would be my husband. We got married, wanted to have children and I had had a very suburban upbringing and we felt like maybe we needed to get out of the city for a while to figure out what we wanted to do do, you know, personally and professionally, and I thought why not just have a baby and then go to business school, so that's what I did. So I started business school with a three month old and took a couple years to study finance as well as nonprofit management. Had the intention of going back into theater, but on the producing side. But I realize, I think just through other folks that I had met in business school, that there were just there were parts of my brain that I what hadn't been working for a while and was ready to get that going again. Loved studying corporate finance and really liked kind of energizing all the analytical side of my brain. So ended up launching a small retail venture right after business school, which is how I fell in love with kind of the retail industry, which then led me to staples, which seems a little strange because that always you know, small entrepreneurial ventures. But another big life thing happened. I actually had twins. So I had had one child while and in business school and then and then had twins and knew that I needed to stop kind of burning the candle at both ends and thought I should get probably a regular job. So through my hat in the ring for a position and finance at staples and within a few weeks found myself sitting in a cube for the first time in my life and stable. Amazingly, was incredibly entrepreneurial for a company that was so big and there were real opportunities for people who if you wanted to define your own career, you could. I was, in strongly encouraged to look at other things other than just like your classic finance job. I had a great manager who sort of pointed me in a few different directions and as soon as I found the sales organization, the B Tob Division within staples, I knew this is where I belong and so I started running strategy group and would put together teams of people to find different initiatives that we thought could deliver additional revenue for the business. So there were a lot of, you know, clearly financial calculations that you had to do in order to get, you know, convince somebody that you could spend some money to make more money, and would just pull together different folks from the sales organization to try new things. And in that role I was able to get really close to a lot of frontline sales managers, so people who were working on on inside sales teams, people who were working on field sales teams, are bb our hunting team, who were out there pound in the pavement, you know, trying to bring on net new customers, and I really loved what the frontline sales managers were doing and I felt a deep connection to them. And after running enough kind of successful initiatives, I was actually placed in roll leading all of our inside sales teams, are hope mid market sales division, and at that point it was just my I don't know if you've read the Book Oh and Meti by John Irving, but that was like the Owen meeting moment. It was like where everything just came together and I realized like this is my calling. I love working in sales, in particular inside love the mid market, you know, I really like small customers and I really like I just kind of lived by curiously through our customers. So was appreciating that and also really liked the social component of sales, combined with all the kind of prep work that you have to do behind the scenes, and it felt almost like working in theater. Right there's a lot of there's the when you're in front of the customer, when you're backstage, and that felt very comfortable to me. And also most folks in sales have an extremely high tolerance for risk, which was just as appealing to me as the folks in theater that I had been drawn to in my first career. So it felt like it just felt very similar. I think a lot of people tie their personal and their professional lives together in sales and you do the same in theater. So it just felt at home and staples really gave me great runway and let me do a tremendous amount. I was kind of learning from folks in the Boston Tech Community, other colleagues that I had gotten to know, and trying to apply a lot of what the tech sales people, I knew we're doing within their organizations to our inside sales division at Staples, which was not quite as high tech, but we were able to introduce a lot of a lot of tools and technologies and different sales processes. Actually started writing business over the phone, which was unheard of. Like you know, fired up a kind of mansion engine coming from the marketing team. Had great partners there who were willing to rethink how we serve the mid market and appreciated that and loved all the teams who kind of came with me along that journey because it was a change for sure. And then through that I ended up meeting some folks from log be in and was asked to come over and and lead inside teams there. So that's when I jumped from distribution into into Sass sales and then recently moved to carbon black. So it's been no looking back since I hit sales, for sure, and I'm really comfortable and happy working in the tech sector now because it really brings together my love of technology as well. Yeah, I mean it's an amazing story, I guess. Were you surprised that...

...you liked sales or that you even ended up in sales. I have to imagine, you know, a theater sort of drama background, maybe maybe like a little left leaning, maybe not, not thinking of yourself as too mercenary, and then in finance and being highly analytical, and then and then all of a sudden you're in sales and sort of, as you mentioned, realizing that that was your calling. How? What was that kind of realization like? And I guess for a lot of people out there it's very difficult to major in sales. So lots and lots of people aren't sure whether this is a career for them. What is your advice to people? How do you know it's a career for you? What are the elements that really as a night? Yeah, that's a good that's a I like how you asked that question that because I've people have asked me similar things, but never in quite that way. But I think in terms of resonating and how did I know, this is what made sense to me. I actually have a have a sixteen year old daughter now and she's thinking about college and you know, how do you know what you want to do for the rest of your life? And I don't think you ever know what you want to do? But when I started working in sales, I just I felt like myself, like I just felt like Oh, this, I know what I'm doing. Like this, actually I'm much more confident. I'm I really enjoyed this, this makes a lot of sense to me. So that was just a natural feeling there. It was never anything that I could have planned and I think now you occasionally hear about there are some schools where you can major in sales or you would learn a lot about sales. I know were Marco bears is doing some great work teaching it at Harvard, at DHBS, people how to you know, how you would actually stand up sales organization and all that you would need to do. But I never thought of it as a profession. I did it just sort of. I fell into it because it made me happy and I think you get that positive reinforcement when you feel like you're good at something and you're happy. But I couldn't have planned for it. With that said, I do talk to a lot of younger folks who are thinking about it, people who might be in marketing, and they think maybe they should try sales, and I always say you should absolutely try if you think you have any interest in it, because you will learn so much about the business and about the customer and it just gives you these incredible building blocks for anything that you might want to do, especially for somebody in marketing who might be into rusted, because if you can actually say that you've sold, you have so much more credibility with any sales organization you ever might want to serve if you had back into the marketing role. So I think that answered your question. But for wasn't a planned it just happened and it had I'm really happy that it did. Yeah, will you self conscious that, because I, if I understand correctly, kind of went from an operations finance position to running a team. Have you ever sort of carried a bag on your own or carried a phone? I guess for easime Metaphor, it's well, so the I've always had the hustle, right. So when I was a theatrical light who center was, basically it was an LLC. Right, so I sold my myself my skills. I had to fit in ten, twelve shows a year in order to make a decent living. Right. So I lived in New York and there was a lot of networking. There was a lot of figuring out how to kind of self promote. So in that way you're selling something that's pretty intangible, right, because you can take pictures of a show, show you might have lit, or hopefully get somebody to a show that maybe you were involved with to see your work. But that was definitely a sales roll. And then when I had launched the retail venture, the colleague that I launched it with, we had actually written the business plan for kind of a capstone course in business school and were approached after we had given a you know, for a panel of judges, we had done the final presentation, we we approached by couple folks and asked if we were looking for funding and if we had a term sheet. So we weren't even planning to start to go into business until we were approached in that way and within three four months we had we were see corp and we were raising money and we got the thing up and running. And then we realized about a year after we had put pen to paper to start the business plan that we were kind of open for business and we had to figure out of cell stuff right. So then it was like wow, we we have employees and we have to come up with a sales methodology and a process and a plan, and that was probably the the closest thing to carrying a bag that I've had. And then at staples, the teams that I was working with, I would go out on sales calls. I would spend a lot of time on the phone with people trying to see how customers would react. But I wasn't, quote, a carrying in those roles initially, not until I moved into a sales leadership. So it is definitely a non traditional path, but one that I think has served me well or and perhaps in a unique way, because I think I can have a perspective on the business that is the tenzero foot view or the Thirtyzero or hundred thousand foot view. You know, I can look at kind of big strategic things that we might need to do and not be immediately connected to how challenging they can be, which I think is sometimes one of the hardest steps when you're come up from having been a, quote, of caring rep to a manager to a director. Every step up that you get in that level of leadership you are having to make more and more difficult decisions and separating yourself from the impact, the direct impact to a Rep. maybe is easier for me because I didn't sit in that seat with the headset on and...

...try to work my way toward a big giant quota, you know, from day one of a new fiscal year. You just said something incredibly interesting. So your point, and this is I don't know if it was patent, it was some general talking about how, you know, too much empathy can be almost be a bad thing in the sense that you have to be able to make tough decisions. Are you talking about, for example, decisions to raise quota or decisions to commit to a number around a new product before you have enough market feedback? Are those some of the decisions where, if you've come up directly from the ranks, maybe you're two absolute to sensitive? Yeah, absolutely, I think that. I think that is the hardest thing for folks, especially moving from a manager to a director role, is when you kind of turn that hat from like really empathizing with the Rep to being that it is company first. Right that that is a very difficult thing for many people to get over, and it doesn't mean I probably then over empathize and other situations with the reps, because I do understand how challenging it is. We're going through territory planning now, we're building out, you know, assigning quota for next year and, you know, I really want everything to be like from a parity perspective, from rep to Rep, from manager to manager. I'm like taking and tying everything because I'm over empathizing with somebody who might then feel like, Oh, this, my patch isn't is equal to the person who sitting next to me his patch, and so I probably over index on a few things, but you can figure that out with the numbers. I so I'm really comfortable there. But yeah, I do think that it's a great thing to for many people to learn and I think that I can provide perspective and of certainly helped coach people into thinking slightly differently and, you know, tip in the scale more to or company first as opposed to individual first. Wow, that's some that's very difficult to do. What's the advice that you give, or is there? Or is it just take? You know, you have to stop thinking that way. Like how do you how do you do that for an upandcoming manager? Yeah, I mean I think for first you got to understand what they want, what their career growth is. Right, maybe managers really happy just being a manager, but if they want to go further, being able to demonstrate that you can separate yourself from the immediacy of some of the decisions is important and people that I have coached usually are coming to me for advice. You know, how did you do it, or how do I get ahead? How do I think about this differently? I think it is a message that I try to send out two folks and if people are receptive to it, there are ways to coach around it. Right, knowing that it will be a blocker, like it just will, if you can't make a decision that is in the best interest of the company. And there you know, you always have do a segmentation challenges. This should be mine, this shouldn't be, you know, and then you got to think about where's that's a great opportunity, right, if somebody feels like this is in my patch, but I actually know not. That really belongs to the field, right, that is not one of ours, having somebody understand and be able to tell you why it makes sense to move that one to the field because it's going to be better served by the customer or maybe that customer does need a regular check in or we think there's a bigger opportunity there that we better for the company if it sits with the field. That's a tough one, but that that those come up a lot, right. So that's a great opportunity to talk to somebody about what they want to do kind of longer term professionally. They let's think about this for the whole of the business and maybe it's happens, the pain of having lost a large account or large opportunity. That's a great teachable moment, even as painful as it can be. Yeah, I mean it's a I remember in one of one of the companies where I worked, a one of the managers, the midmarket manager. We had a rule that if it was enterprise, the enterprise controlled all of the subsidiary companies of that large conglomerate. And the midmarket manager came and said we've got we're all the way down the sales cycle with this one company and we just did a little hoover's research and realize their subsidiary. What should we do? And I said what we've already decided, but the rules are yeah, you have to give it to the enterprise. Yeah, but then you can make fun of them for tasting two thousand dollar deals. Right, five thousand dollar deals. That's what I did not getting. I'm getting exactly my public shame. I might have done that a few times. What you mentioned that you really like mid market and SMB and you really like inside sales. And of course, to your point, you've been that customer. You've run SMB businesses on your own and understand the challenges. But when you think about kind of even tactics and methodologies, what are some of the core, you know, competitive advantages that you think you bring to the table when you're running an inside sales team that you think really are helpful and help make that team run run on time? Yeah, so I'm, I think, like most inside sales. They just I don't know if this is anything unique to me, but I think I'm verily process oriented and process driven and I believe that activity begets sales right. Like there's a core set of things that we should all be doing on a daily, weekly, monthly basis and that that will set us up for success, to beat our bookings target rights. But you got to do these small things along the way to get there. So I do spend quite a bit of time talking about the sales process, ensuring that we have the right one and that we, as a management and leadership team, actually can spell out, you know, one of the five things that everybody that's our job, like we have to figure out,...

...you know, how many phone calls, how much pipeline? What are the things that you need to do to be successful, and we have to figure that out. So that's kind of the handshake with my team's is it. I'm going to work really hard to make sure that we've got the formula right, but you have to commit to the formula and we might tweak it along the way, but we believe that this is what we'll lead us to success. So I think that's where the like analytical side of me comes in. But then you can also really personalize it, because if people commit to the activities that we believe will deliver success, then we will be successful. It also then less you kind of back your way into we've got you. If you're doing four of the five things, is there some reason why you're not doing the fifth right, like, are you making a ton of dials, getting great conversations, building a lot of pipeline, but you just aren't booking everything, like there's something you probably don't have to close, like maybe we need just to get you some special coaching on closing or negotiating, or maybe you're discounting too much. Like there's helps us identify like what needs to be worked on to help everybody get to being, you know, attained, to attaining. So I would say that's probably the core thing going for me. I also just I really like I love an inside sales solore. I love the energy and the VIBE and walking around in the morning and just talking to people or just picking up on you know, when the throughout the course of the day, things kind of Peek in the ebb and the flow. I am a big Fan of like group exercise right so I'll go do it spin class or yoga class or something where there's a lot of people with individual goals all on the same room trying to achieve the same thing in a given time frame, and I think an inside sales floor can be a lot of that as well. So I love to kind of set the the tone for what we accomplished and have everybody have a personal goal, but also all of us have a collective goal together. I think those are probably I don't know that those are unique, but I think those are a few of the ways that I kind of think about running an inside team. I know you're like you're the big deal guy. I love the mid market. I love that predictable engine that we can provide to the rest of an organization. Just high velocity. We know it's coming. If we fire up the demands Gin and get all the leads flowing, we absolutely can deliver x because we've defined the process. That to me, yeah, powerful. I mean my world is scary and how binary it is, you know, lumpy earlier, like a lumpy those big deals and then but you got to have if we're going to if this, if this organ is going to grow, where anything is going to grow, you really need some kind of predictable revenue engine and I think the mid market, with most products there there's an opportunity for that. Do you have do you guys use band or do you have a I guess I've sort of too. You want to tact a question like what's your qualification methodology? And then the second is, do you believe that it matters? Do you know? Do you bring a specific kind of sales process or you know, a different, specific way you want to architect the sales cycle in terms of entry and extra criteria for sales, for stages that you think makes a difference? What's your point of view on sort of qualification and sales methodology and how do you approach that? Yeah, yeah, so I love the question and it's something that I've been spending a lot of time talking with people here about. I'm most familiar with band. That's what we were using it at log me in. It was really built into the sales process and appreciated that. Here there's been a history of using Medpick, but there's also some bad questions worked in. There's IT'S A it's there's a few different things stylistically that are happening. We have a company that has grown through. There was an acquisition there. There's kind of a smushing together of sales methodologies and I think one thing that will do for next year is really get it to be all the same, so much more similar and very tied to specifically what we're selling and what we need kind of at each point in the sales process. So I don't think med pick will go away. I think that's been here for a while and I expect that will will stick with that. You know, we have a it's a very we have a very technical buyer and we do need to make sure that we're going slow and kind of checking all of those boxes through the process. So that's probably what we'll stick with. Yeah, and and for me, I do think you need something. I think you need something, if for no other reason than just to provide something to coach from right because if, if everybody's all over the place, it's harder to say like hey, you know what, you know, nine times out of ten this is going to help you if you'd spell this path. And people tend to like a path, and they sure do. But it sounds like your point, which I think I probably fundamentally agree with, is it's you need. You need something, but you know, there's not going to be a massive difference if it's Medpick or medic or medical or band or whatever. It's just you need some kind of framework that's consistent. Yeah, yes, yes, hundred percent. So one of the you know, there's a there's a there's a pretty big I don't know if it's an elephant in the room, but it's but it's effect of life, which is that you have three kids and you know you you've chosen a really difficult path and you're you know you're kicking ass at it. But what's your advice? I mean, I think specifically it's harder, candidly, for women than for men, even with, you know, are striving for gender equality. A lot of the household duties and domestic duties may be based on, you know, centuries of stereotypes,...

...but they still tend to fall disproportionately on on women. How have you thought about your career? How do you think about giving advice to because we want, you know, we need and want more women and executive physicians in executive sales positions. What's the advice that you give to the upandcomers and how do you lay that foundation for the future and how did you approach it? Yeah, I do like this question and I have I tend to speak pretty when ly and freely and personally when asked questions like this, because I do have a lot of young women asking me. So I'm glad that you asked it and there's a couple different things that happened for me. One is I married the right Guy Right so I my husband is amazing and we it's a partnership and we had a point in our kind of crazy lives where we made a decision that I really loved my job and I loved working and that we would sort of organize around that. Right. So his career took a little bit of a back seat, or maybe a side seat. I think maybe's in the passenger seat, but it's it's still important to him, but it's not as important as mine is to me, just in terms of like defining who I am and what makes me really happy. So he actually after the twins, when the twins were got probably three four years old, he made the decision to work freelance from home. So my husband's a writer, he's a technical writer and works in the healthcare industry and had worked at enough different places that he could kind of contact folks and build up a little bit of his own clientele and and we were comfortable with him, you know, making the leap when we needed it, and that then turned in that was like one of the best decisions we ever made. So I think he probably would like to get back into an office environment and not be alone, you know, for many hours of the day writing and talking by a conference call and and you know, go to meeting. But he is doing well and he spends a ton of time with our girls. So he knows how to put, you know, the hair and Buns for ballet. He can do he drives car pools. He's on a more of a texting basis with all the MOMS in my neighborhood than I am arranging play these after school. There was a period of time where kids would often just pile into our house in the morning and he would drive everyone up to school because there were quite a few MOMS who work in our neighborhood and they knew that my husband would be home and there were I knew there were more kids than there were seat belts in the cars when here, when he was driving everybody up to school. But I just let that pass because I was on my way to work. So I think we had a could kind of balance there. I'll also say that there comes a point where you just got to decide, like am I gonna? I don't Cook, like you know. I would rather on the nights where I offered to you dinner, why order out or I order in for us or right, take people out of you do something different. I'm happy to have to pay for somebody to clean my house. I'm happy to do like there are things that I just don't put a Barden on myself, and I think that that is was it just a choice or a decision that you make? When I have free time, I want to spend it with my family and there's plenty of people who are willing to help, especially if you can, you know, pay them to do the cleaning or the yard workers, the things that just aren't a priority for me right now. That makes sense, but do you believe? Of course it doesn't. You know, as my wife will tell you, I am I am a service as guy. I want to pay somebody to do basically everything. But I was trying to get some pay to somebody to clean my closet and she said that's not half. I have to do that myself still, but that's yeah, of course it makes sense. Do you believe that people can have it all? You know, Sheryl Sandberg says lean in. She also happens to be a billionaire. You know, is that possible? I think it just kind of define what you're all is, and I think it ebbs and flows right this is what we're doing for now and like everything is working, but it might not always be this way. I think one of the things I really love about working in sales is that the personal and professional life can so blend together. I think also, working in sales you have a lot of flexibility with your schedule, right, so if you need to get to a doctor's appointment with your daughter or if you need to go and see a ballet recital, there are ways to work around it. You still got to hit your number, but you can hit your number in a different way, like it doesn't have to be in the traditional nine to five glued to a desk. So I think that has provided a lot of opportunity for me. But I might when I you know, I got my lists that I work I'm a big list maker. When I work through my list or when I organize my calendar, half of it is works off, half of it as personal. It's all blended together. That's just I don't think of it as a balance. I just think of it as this is my life. Yep, and it's all of the new phrases work life integration, as opposed to work left bound. Yeah, yeah, so one of the things while we're on this topic of sort of like, you know, life optimization. You know there's this twitter meme or and people make fun of it, of course, but you know, all of the best people wake up at four am. You know, there's this theme or this idea held amongst some people that you have to grind, that you know, success is a grind and it is a grind of twenty hour days or eighteen hour days, and you don't believe that.

What's your approach and give us sort of your reaction to that sentiment that you know, if you're not, if you're not burning the candle at both ends, that you're not you're not strong enough to make your career work. Yeah, I think so. I definitely was in the work like crazy mode for a while in my life and realize, you know, you get tired, like you can't, you're not making good decisions, you're getting frustrated your if every time you see an old friend you say, oh my gosh, everything so crazy, like that's nobody wants to hear that anymore, let alone like me, like I was tired of saying it. So I then just realize, like I probably could get more done if I didn't try to burn the midnight, you know, just I just put some structure around my life, like there's things that I do. I don't get up at four. I do get up at five, though, but that's because I really enjoy working out in the morning and having just time to myself. I love having a cup of coffee, reading the paper and what times, what time to go to bed. It's depends on if I'm trying to catch up on work or emails, but anywhere in the thirty ten to thirty twelve range. Five six hours sleep I'm good, but seven eight hours of sleep I'm great. So if I can get that sleep, like I know I'm just going to really kick but the next day right and accomplish a lot and I try to leave every day by a reasonable time to get home in time for dinner and I try not to get back online. is a little different into quarter, as my family will tell you, but I try not to get back online until into the evening if I need to do emails. But there are also portions during the day at work where I make sure that I am spending time with people, getting, especially a new job now, getting to know people. But I always try to have either lunch or coffee or something where you're just like relaxed and you're not staring at your laptop or multitasking, and just I'm happier that way and I think I make better decisions and I'm you're better at listening when you're not doing a million things. I will say, I mean there are points of time during the fiscal years certainly, where you got to pull not all nighters, but you have to work really, really hard, but that's not a way that I can that I am good at, like maximizing my output. I'm better when there's a balance and I there are things that I have I just I need to do at least five times a week, like working out and just having some time to myself, and so I make sure that happens. Sometime with friends, time with family. Those are all important things and I think they make me better and stronger at work. I'm sure you're correct. I am, but this may be me rationalizing my own laziness, which happens a lot. What's so we're coming to to the end of this conversation. This has been amazing and what we like to do is pay it for we like to figure out what's influencing you, what people have influenced you. So when you think about v piece of sales or chief marketing officers or chief revenue officers that you know either have, have you admire or that we just you think we should know about, give us some name so we can do a little googling and linkedin searching and and read up on some folks absolutely well. So a couple of it just my strongest mentors from staples. They have both recently left, but Neil Ringele, who was headed up all of the North American commercial division, and then she are, a goodman who, when I knew her most, she was the CEO and provided great coaching and mentoring for me. But then, of course Larry D'Angelo at log man is just a phenomenal CSO and has just a legacy of growing grooming talent. So he's just incredible in the Bund in the Boston Tech Community. And then a couple folks that I really admire. One is a guy named Josh Allen who was at log man just prior to my joining. He left to go to cargaroo's got them through their IPO and now he's had a sales at drift. So he's just a wonderful person and just as had a great career, like something that you know, everybody kind of points to in admiration, and just has a good, very disciplined way of leading sales teams that everyone remembers and it's been recognizes. There's also a guy named Bob Marsh who I really admire, who found it a company called level eleven that made a it's a sales enablement tool that that I used at staples. Were thinking about using one of the pieces of it here to help us build out a scorecard. I like him because he was a sales guy. Who've had an a sales manager and he has something needed and he had he went and made it right because he didn't he couldn't find what he needed in the market place. I thought that was pretty cool. And then it's pretty cool. Yeah, and there's a couple of personal mentors, some women that I've gotten to know in the Boston area who have really been helpful to me personally and professionally. But a woman named Liz Kane who's with open view venture partners Kara Gilbert and as sausage a cat. There's there's a great group of women in the Boston Tech Community who all bond together and make sure we have, you know, drinks at least once a quarter. But those three are certainly part of my part of my close network. Awesome. Any books you think we should be reading, books that you think have informed your sales philosophy? Yeah, I'm a I love to read and just kind of consume anything, books, podcast. I have just a stack of sales books, you know, by beside the bed that I'm trying to make my way through. There's a few that I always come back to and a couple of them I'm in the you know,...

...kind of rereading now and sharing with the my leadership teams here at Carbon Black. One is called cracking the Sales Management Code. It's an incredible book, Jason Jordan, Michelle Azana, but it really puts out there this kind of a lot of places, a lot of importance on managing to the metrics, like making sure that you actually are managing not to some elusive bookings number but to actual, you know, activities that can be managed, which is something that I really also believing. And they write some in there about just the importance of the frontline sales manager as being just the greatest point of leverage within any inside sales organization. And I a hundred percent believe that there's a book I often suggest to folks that are on my leadership team to read, which is called it's your ship by Captain Michael Abershoff, and it really just has great management philosophy perspective. Love that book and and I've come back to measure what matters the John Door, just trying to figure out how to set OK ours in a new job, in a new place. Like it's hard, right, it's hard. And so that I have that one on audio tay. I listened to that on audible. Awesome. And then last you know, any mottos or principles, any phrase you want to leave us with as we head off into the sunset? I love and where mantraband be here now. Just like be present, just be in the moment, enjoy every minute of your career, of your time. You know, if your day, I think don't don't rush, because life is just just kind of going to happen and I think you can just be present. Is the best way to make the next wonderful thing happen. I love it, amy. Thank you so much for joining us. On the salesacker podcast. It's been a great conversation and hope to talk to your meet you soon. Thank you for having me. Hey everybody, it is Sam Jacobs. This is Sam's corner and really, really enjoyed that conversation with amy appiguard. She has just the right combination of skills required to be a really effective sales later. She's got the right level of empathy, she's got the right analytical approach and she also she just has a passion for sales itself. So I think that there was a lot to learn. Particularly listen to points and one of them, you know, is not really sales related per se, but it's just about how to get along in life. We talked about how she's managing a family of three and while she went to business school and Watch, she runs a team of over two hundred people and what she said was she had an honest conversation with her partner, with her husband, and they divided up the responsibilities and her husband is the guy that stayed at home and helped raise the kids and tackle the majority of the domestic responsibilities, and amy was the one that decided she wanted to pursue the career and make her career the priority from an economic perspective for that family. I think what it tells you just if you're in a relationship out there, honest communication is always so important. It's important with the prospect, it's important with your partner, just establishing the right framework for how you both are going to make decisions, whatever type of partner you choose. So sort of a random non sales but kind of sales, all about the importance of authenticity and honesty when it come and effective communication. Here's the second thing that she said, which is directly related to sales management. Man, wasn't it interesting when she said, you know, sometimes the problem that upandcoming managers have is that they empathize too much with the individual rep whether it's with territory design or with dispute about, you know, wh which lead belongs to which person. But you have to be able to distance yourself from the team, and I see this time and time again first time managers. You know, when they say my team, they mean the people that report to them, they mean the mean the people that they control, and that's not the way to think about it. The first team has to be the company and you, you know you read about that in the in Lency one's book, the five dysfunctions of a team. But really your first responsibility as you go higher in the organization is to the company itself, and the more you think that you are simply an advocate on behalf of the people that you manage, frankly, the less reliable you are to senior management because you are constantly advocating. You always want to bring home the rays and the better complan. You can always do that. Sometimes you need to be the one explaining the decision that the company made back to the individual reps and building consensus from the top down to the people that you work with really really important. Reach out to me if you have any questions about that, because I've seen so many people fall into traps. Now you'll find this podcast on itunes through Google play. We know you're kind of a big deal. So if you enjoyed this episode, you whoever you are, if you're on your if you're in the car, I in a pull over. Just pull over, get out your phone and share this episode on Linkedin, share it on twitter or elsewhere. If you've got a great idea for a guest or for a piece of content get in touch. So if you want to get in touch with me, find me on twitter at Sam f Jacobs or on Linkedin at linkedincoms in Sam f Jacobs, and would love to hear from you. Once again, a...

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