The Sales Hacker Podcast
The Sales Hacker Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

69. Structuring Your Organization Around Your Customer w/ Megan Bowen

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This week on the Sales Hacker podcast, we speak with Megan Bowen, SVP of Business Operations at Managed By Q

Megan spent over a decade building and managing customer and revenue generation teams for leading technology companies, so when it comes to understanding how companies can structure their organization around the customer, she’s leading the pack.

One, two, one, three, three. Quote. Hey everybody, as Sam Jacobs, welcome to the salesacker podcast. We are delighted and honored and gratified today to have on the show Megan Bowen, who's the svp of business operations for managed by Q, or was when we recorded this episode. She's an incredible executive. She's a member of revenue collective. She actually has somebody that that interviews new members in New York and either recommend them for admission or not. She's a great person, she's a great human she gives back and she shares her content really actively on Linkedin. She's just an all around great professional.'re Lucky to get to speak with her and we're happy about it. Now, before we dive into the show, we want to thank our sponsors. We've got two sponsors today. The first is lucid chart. A lucid charts sale solution specifically. So there rolling out this sales specific solution, which is why it's called lucid chart sales solution. If I can just say the same words over and over like fifty times, I think I'll have done something important. Anyway, what's the point? The point is that lucid chart sale solution is the leading account planning platform from Modem Sales Arts. If you are going to market in the enterprise space, you understand that you need an ORC chart. You need to understand how you're going to go after each and every account. If you're doing an account based marketing strategy, you need this solution. So this is the lucid chart sales solution. You can visually map out key contacts and crucial account data to uncover critical insights that will allow you to close bigger deals faster. Go to lucid chartcom forward. Just lash sales for more information. That's lucid chartcom forward sales. Our second sponsors outreach. outreaches, the leading sales engagement platform and the creator of the sales engagement category and the author of the sales engagement book, which you should buy an Amazon. Outreach support sales ups by enabling them to humanize their communications at scale, from automating the soul sucking manual work that eats upselling time to providing action ory two tips on what communications are working best. Outreach has your back. If you hear that Siren in the background, that is New York City. New York City wants you to know that you should go f yourself just getting their saving somebody. That's why there's a siren. It's definitely not that the cops are just running through the red light and putting on their siren because they don't want to stop for the Red Light. That's definitely not what's happening. Anyway, here's the interview with Megan Bowen. Hey everybody, it's Sam Jacobs. Welcome back to the sales hacker podcast. We are so excited today to have a good friend and also one of the top operators in New York City on the show, and I'm talking about Megan Bowen. So Megan currently, as of this recording, which is July ninth, two thousand and nineteen, is the senior vice president for business operations that managed by Q, which was recently acquired by the weak company, which is the company, of course, that we mostly know of as we work. So let me tell you about Megan before we dive into the interview. She spent over a decade building and managing customer and Revenue Generation Teams for leading technology companies. She's worked with companies across the food, medical and hospitality industries to create top tier account management it's sales functions, all focused on building long term relationships with clients and generating more revenue for the company. She currently leads business operations and operations, which includes marketing, sales, account management, customer experience at managed by Q, The platform for office management and a new division of the week company. Prior to Q, Megan built the account management function for grubub seamless from scratch and scale the BB client experience and account management structure for seamless is five thousand plus business clients. She also built the post sale client facing teams at ZOC DOC from the ground up and graduated from a Delphi University with a degree in business management. Megan, welcome to the show. Hi Sam, great to be here also. I of course, I should mention that you're also a loyal member of revenue collective. We didn't, I didn't even include that near Bio, but I probably should have. I know it's been over a year since I joined. I love it. We're excited. You're one of our top you're one of our most highly acknowledged members and we're always referencing the fact that Megan Bowen has joined. Therefore, it must be an awesome community so the first...

...thing we like to do. I just gave your background, but we want to know a little bit about and obviously you know if there's information that you can't provide, that's totally fine, but you know your current title as of July ninth is SPP business operations. That managed by Q. We want to give you an opportunity to tell us what is managed by Q. Absolutely managed by q is the platform for office manage. Meant we help companies build, design and operate and manage their spaces, and that's through a combination of our technology that allows them to manage employee request, workplace team task management, as well as discover, book and pay for any vendors that need to come into their space to handle anything, whether it's cleaning, maintenance, staffing it or security jobs. So really the one stop shop for the office manager so that they have all of the tools and access to our vetted market place of service providers to take care of all of the thingings that come up when you're running a workplace day to day. Wow, and and the company is is wellknown here in New York. You know we've got listeners all over the world. But tell us a little bit about the history. You've raised some money and then tell us just walk us through, like what's been happening over the last couple of years, because obviously it culminates in an acquisition, which is always fun to hear about. Absolutely yeah, over the last five years we've raised just under a hundred million before the we work acquisition. In two thousand and fourteen. Manage by Q was originally created as a first party cleaning and maintenance company. So at the time the need in the market that our founder, Dan Tyurran, noticed was there wasn't high quality service companies to take care of the office space, and so he found an opportunity to build that team from scratch. He read this book called the Good Job Strategy, and the point of that book was really to highlight how, if you created employment opportunities and provided competitive wages and benefits to these types of workers, like janitors or cleaners, for example, that you would reduce turnover, they would be more loyal, they would provide a higher quality of service. So he built out this team over the first two years of the company and we grew really quickly, primarily in New York, but also San Francisco, Chicago and La over the course of the first two years I really focused on providing cleaning and maintenance and about two thousand and sixteen that was when the company made its first pivot, if you will, and we realize that we had an opportunity to help our customers with a lot more than just cleaning and maintenance services. So we created a marketplace and we found a bunch of different third party vendors, put them through vetting process to make sure that they met our standards and began to offer our clients access to book much more than just cleaning and maintenance. So we stood up an IT category, security, staffing, office improvements, on and on. And as we've done that over the last couple of years and really built out that market place, we further expanded to Boston and actually right now we're really excited we're expanding into for new markets, Seattle, the Delphia, Dallas and Austin. And as we've continued to build out the product, we realized how useful that was to our customers and that there is another gap in the market that we've identified and that there are no tools for office managers to run their workplace, and so we're really doubling down on our product vision and we hope over the next six months we continue to add features that create value for those office managers so we can effectively begin charging a subscription to use the software which today they use for free to primarily book services. So we're excited to embark on this next evolution and really go from a services company to software...

...company also offering services. So that's what's on the horizon. Generally excited about that's super exciting and and so and you were recently acquired by the week company. You're very specific about that. I might say we work, but you must say the week company. When did that? Walk us through when that happen? When was that announced? The we work acquisition was announced on April third of this year. You know, several months of work leading up to that, after the last raise. Dan I and our executive team, you know, we're we're back out pitching and this option came to the table and it made a ton of sense. We work is obviously in our same space and there, you know, core competency is really focused on acquiring space via lease or purchase, you know, making that space more attractive and monetizing that space through whether it's a hot desk or whether it's an entire office, and almost of their technology to date has really been for their members, focused on a lot of community and access to different programs, but not necessarily technology to operate the physical space. So we were a really great complement to their long term vision and it's exciting. They're a huge company, in the news a ton. You know, they're growing really quickly. My former boss at grub hub, Nick Worswick, is the head of sales there, so back to working alongside him, which I'm excited about. So overall it's been extremely positive and the intent is for us to continue to execute on our vision sort of as an independent division for the foreseeable future. That's awesome. Well, congratulations on the acquisition. So you know, I read your bio. You and and to the point. You know, you work for nick at GRUB HUB and now you're at we work and you've been at Zackduck. So you've had a pretty impressive career culminating and an incredible role. It managed by Q. How did you get here? Walk US through. You know, we talked a bit, a little bit about origin story, but it's always interesting to hear about people that maybe didn't self identify, which is, frankly, the majority of the of the sales and marketing community. Didn't self identify as as a salesperson or a revenue leader or a commercial leader when you were growing up, but you found your way into these positions. So give us a little bit about your history and your origin store in your background leading up to this moment. Yeah, definitely. I always like telling people I was actually born and raised in southern California. I moved to New York in two thousand and three, though, so I think I can officially say I'm a New Yorker. But I do love, do love California and growing up in Lah I was enamored with, you know, the film industry and filmmaking. So you know, literally up until I went to college, I was dead set on becoming a movie maker. I was going to be a famous director. I made movies as a kid. That was that was my passion and I was dead set on doing that. Come time to apply for colleges, you know, I decide all major in business and maybe I should think about some other options. So I wise. So yours. Why did I? Why did you do that? Because you know that that Cam quorder childhood. That's like Steven Spielberg's background too. So what was it that caused you to shift from movie making into business? I think at the time, I think there was two things. So, as I was deciding which schools I was going to apply to and what I was going to major in, what I realized was it would be beneficial for me to have a strong foundation and if I could create a career where I could make money, I could do anything that I want with that money, whether it was making a movie or one of my other childhood dreams was opening up a casino called the boom boom room. So I just figured let me be successful, let me make a ton of money, and then I can do whatever I want and nobody can stifle my creativity or get in my way. I would say this. The second thing is right after high school, I got one of those letters in the mail from...

...vector marketing cut co and it was seemed like this exclusive opportunity where they, you know, singled me out invited me to an interview where I could make a ton of money. So I go show up to this interview this one day, quickly realize it's a group interview. Quickly realize an hour later I'm basically being brainwashed to buy a packet of knives and, you know, not be guaranteed any money, but if I can sell them I can make commission. And I realize that what was happening in the moment, but I was equally as caught up in the excitement and I said I want to give this a try, and I think I did it for about a year in La and then in San Diego when I moved down there for my first year of college, and I fell in love with sales when I was at cut Co. It was you experience that first high when you sell your first big deal. You really feel the pain of rejection and build up sort of a thick skin and realize that you just gotta you gotta keep trying. So I think that early experience really exposed me to that world and May being were interested to pursue it. Wow and and I think we have to give credit to cut K for for training and training so many people, because that cut coast story is a common story. My sister sold cut co knives, you know, when we were growing up. So it sa it just it brings an indoctrinate's a whole community of young people into the world of sales and some people really catch the book, as you did. So how what happened from there? So you're in southern California, you decide to go into business, but then where you still in college in two thousand and three when you move to New York? Or Walk us through sort of your your New York East Coast experience. Oh yes, so I went. I did my first year of college at San Diego State. I didn't quite get the courage to apply to New York right out of high school, but a few months in I realized no, I want to be in New York. So I began applying to transfer to to a school out you know, to start my second year, and so Nyu as my dream school. I got in, but then I ended up applying to a Delphi as my backup and they basically offered me practically a full ride. So I made the economic decision and decided all right, I'm going to pack up my bags, move out there and finish college at a Delphi that was on it's in Garden City, Long Island. But I really wanted to live in Manhattan, so I ended up living in Harlem and doing kind of the reverse commute to finish college. And you know, while I was in college I just did odd jobs. I ended up doing some selling with like opera tickets, worked an ice screen shop, ended up at a hair salon as a receptionist. Paid really well and that that was also my transformative experience from kind of turning into from a California hippie to sort of a New York City, more sophisticated woman. So that helped me bridge the gap and and make my transition into New York. From there, one of the clients at the Salon offered me my first like office job. I was basically a data researcher, office manager, Personal Assistant. She ended up being a little bit of a difficult boss, but I learned a lot from her and from there I then went to Etchok where I was an account manager for about six years. So then that was my first foray and to the New York startup scene. It's a small company, about fifty employees, selling software to schools, and my main focus was on implementation of that software, training, ongoing retention, renewal and up cell. So that's really where I learned everything about account management. I did that for six years, which it's kind of a long time, and I really credit the amount of time I invested to really internalizing and understanding really all of the facets of account management. It's a very complex discipline. So that was, in hindsight, I think that was...

...extre beremely beneficial for the future of my career. So let's talk about that a little bit. So I mean account management, customer success. It is one of the major topics of the day and you mentioned that it's an incredibly complicated and sort of multifaceted discipline. When you think about kind of like core elements of delivering the right level of account management or customer success, like what goes into it for you, how do you build a strategy? Walk us through that, because I think you've got so many great experiences leading account management teams that I think is probably like one of the course skills that you've developed over the last couple of years. Definitely, and I think so. Yeah, I would say the beginning. It starts with the sale. So there needs to be really tight alignment between sales and account management and as part of the sales process, the seller needs to make sure that, number one, we're selling to the right customer, they're beginning to talk about what implementation and what the post sale experience is going to look like to begin to set and manage expectations and the larger the deal. But if you're talking and enterprise customer, actually bringing the account management like the account manager, in at the late stage sort of sales cycle, before the formal close, can be really impactful. So that's a really important piece that a lot of people completely skip over. Then you have on boarding. So once the sale is made, the table is set on what the post sale experience is going to look like. The onboarding experience is basically the account manager really making their first impression and you really need to nail that experience. If you know, they say that poor onboarding is one of the leading causes of Churn. So that's that must be a very intentional, thoughtful process where it's very clear that the account manager is adding value to the relationship and clearly articulating how the product or service is driving a particular business outcome for that customer. So I would say those two pieces are probably the most critical. There's a lot of conversation, especially yeah, as you know, within revenue collective, about organizing and structuring these teams. Some people are more focused on like a kind of traditional, classic Hunter Farmer Model. There's a sales team, once the sale is made, they hand it off to an account management team. That Account Management Team has a respect one of the you know, their Kpis are not just renewal but also maybe upset. Then there's another framework where there's maybe three teams. There's a customer success team that has no revenue incent of, there's an account management team that does the upset and there's a new business team that does the sale. And there's probably a third model where the salesperson is the is the commercial point of contact for the client the whole time and there's a separate account management CS team that again is not revenue oriented. What's your preference on how to organize a team? Do you think account management teams should be motivated by up cells in addition to renewals? Do you think there should be a team like cs that has no revenue incent of? Walk US through your philosophy. Yeah, that's a great question. So I will start by saying that I think the different models can work in different environments. So I don't know if there's a right or wrong answer here. But that said, I do have a strong opinion on what I think makes the most sense for especially the types of businesses that I've been involved in. So it's funny at Grubhub, seamless and nick actually hired me because at the time that seamless beb business had been running for about thirteen years with only a sales team and basically like a customer support team. There was no post sale function and the business was very successful and grew to about three thousand clients over the course of, you know, that significant period, you know, without an account management function. However, Nick, you know, noticed that the growth was starting to plateau. The new business teams...

...were finding that they were spending most of their time with established customers and we were seeing sort of net new logo acquisition, you know, sort of drop or or stay fairly consistent. So he made that decision that, you know, if we bring in account management we can really maximize our client growth and and maintain a better growth rate for net new clients. And he was completely right. And so in that context sort of the the betab software, it made complete sense to bring in that account management function. Now, the way that I built out the account management function at Grub hub was basically creating one team that did both customer success stuff and account management stuff. The one model that is very hard for me to get on board with is where there is a CS person and also an am and a salesperson. In my opinion, that's too many people and that, although it can be a little bit difficult to hire four, there are people that have the right mix of skills to do both, you know, retention, product adoption, customer success playbook activities, as well as be savvy enough to handle a renewal and or and upsell. So I typically land on the you know, the seller and then one post sale team, and you can call it whatever you want. Really I believe that if you, as an account manager, are focused on helping your customer achieve their business outcomes, which is which is a very customer success sentence, that the up cell and the renewal will follow. I don't actually think you need two different people doing that and I actually think if you just focus on helping the customer be successful, you know, the revenue follows that, and I've seen that in the different contexts that I've been in, whether it was grubbub or Zack doc or even manage by q. So I've high confidence that that that makes a lot of sense. Now I know that there are some businesses or products that might be, you know, super complex and may require like a product specialist or you know. So I acknowledge that there are environments where, you know, some of those other structures might make sense and similarly, I think that there could be an argument made for having, you know, your seller continue to own those relationships. But there's certainly a tradeoff because at some point you're going to see that slow like the slowing down of the net new growth. Yeah, do you what do you think about the argument that the customer wants somebody that whose advice they can truly trust and if the account management team is motivated by up cells, they are always worried about the advice they're getting from their account manager because it's entangled with the financial incentives? It's a great question. Actually been reading a couple of books on this topic lately, drive by Daniel Pink and there's another book called the tyranny of metrics, and it's really making me think differently about variable compensation and incentive structures for account management. I think that it can work but more and more, as I've been reading and sort of witnessing that even the behaviors of my team, I have a thesis that if you just remove that component from the actual complan of the individual and really push them to focus on what is right for the customer, those financial outcomes will still happen. I haven't yet proved that in theory the teams, all of the Post sale teams that I've managed, has had some type of variable component, although it's been a relatively small percentage of their total ote, but it's something that I'm currently thinking about potentially making a change, and especially now at q were in an interesting stage. We're about to sort of pivot to this software business and it could be an opportunity...

...to test out a different way to think about incentives. But basically my thesis is I think you can remove them completely, focus the am on making the customer successful and you'll still get your up cells and renewals. I tend to actually agree with you and I also you know, I've been in so many conversations internally at companies where we're all sitting around trying to design the perfect complan for and it could even be forsty are sometimes, but often times it's Cs and account management and what's the variable component and what how many basis points of renewal should go to their bonus and all this stuff, and sometimes you're just you just take a step back and think like we could just pay them the right salary and ask them to do these things because it's their job. We don't have to create every single we don't have to create this complete, pletely complicated incentive structure to ask them to do things on behalf of the customer like that can just be part of the job description and the salary can include all of the things. Absolutely and my my top performing account managers in all of the companies I've worked at have literally told me that this plan doesn't change what I do date today. I am focused on building great relationships with my customers, helping them and adding value, and that also is, I think, a an interesting data point of hearing from those top performers that they're basically not motivated by that, and that goes back to whether you know, ideally we're all looking for people that have that intrinsic motivation versus Extron extrinsic. So I think finding the right person and the right profile is definitely in the mix there. But yeah, so hopefully I can test that out, que and have some more concrete experience to back that up and you can report back to us. Will have you back on this show in a few months and you can tell us what happened. Sounds good. So one of the things you've said or thought is that sales and account management are the best function from which to start a career. Walk us through why you think that. Obviously you started your career in sales, originally at cut co, but why do you think it's so good for other people to begin their careers in these roles? So, in my opinion, everything that all businesses are doing or ultimately in service of a customer, for that customer to see value you and for them to pay for that value. So everything, in my opinion, comes back to the customer. Even if you're an engineer or product manager, if you're not in sync with your customers pain points and how you can fix them, you're not going to be successful. So it's that exposure to the customer that I think is is critical, and those roles just create an environment where you're talking to customers every single day and then additionally, I would say being on the front lines and having to change someone's mind, convince somebody to do something, calm down a really angry customer because something bad happened, being able to be effective, and all of those scenarios build skills that you can use in many different areas including, you know, continuing to grow your career and repurposing those skills as you begin to build and manage teams. First of all, of course, I agree with you. Something I've noticed at companies is sometimes the and I'm curious in your perspective, the account management of the sales teams are the people that are talking to the customers every day and oftentimes there's either no structure to bring feedback from the as they would say, the voice of the customer, back to the product and engineering teams, or there there are structures but for whatever reason they're just not the account management teams in the sales teams are aren't taken a seriously and often times of product team says no, no, you know, the product managers need to go out and interview the customers. Set up twenty meetings for us so we can talk to the customer. In your experience, what's the best way to align the organization around the customer so that the people that are having the most conversations with a customer can find...

...their voices into the product development of the actual product. That's a great question and I agree it's, I think, a challenge in many organizations. One of the things that I've observed and have tried to implement is often client facing teams, when they're communicating with product about customer feedback, they communicate within the context of offering solutions like so, for example, I just talked to this customer and they really need this feature, you should build this thing in the product. And that type of direction or feedback to a product team is typically not well received. And what I what I try and tell my teams to do, is you need to reframe it. As I have discovered, a pain point or a point of frustration or a need. My client wasn't able to do x because our product didn't make it easy or obvious. So if you present your feedback within the context of the problem statement or the pain point that is one of product team becomes very receptive and even frankly, as an am or as a sales rep often you know you might be recommending a solution that you thought of or that your Client Express but that actually might not be what is the right implementation of that solution in the product. So I think that's always my piece of advice to client facing teams is just express the problem or the pain point. The other thing that I would say is something that we've started here at q which has been really successful, is the product managers will often schedule these customer interviews, but they ensure that they invite the account manager along so that both of them are part of that conversation and we found that those interviews have been more valuable when you have those three stakeholders on that same call. But it is a challenge and you know, of course we have, you know, regular meetings where we bring all those stakeholders together. You know, we have feedback forms. It's not perfect, but I would say sort of those first two points would be things that I've done that I've seen work well. How did you discover, I think the first point you made is really, really, really important and it's really hard. It's not intuitive, I don't think, for a lot of people. How did you discover this perspective that we need to reframe the way that we're articulating these things so that people feel like they can have a canvas from which to solve a problem, as it posed to being dictated a solution. How did you figure that out or was it just trial and air? It's a great question. I think I've been fortunate enough at ZAC DOC, at Grub hub and at Q, I've always had a strong relationship with the product stakeholders and I think because of that, and I sort of established that earlier on in my career, I was able to really understand how they receive information and how they sort of process and product plan. So I think it was my exposure to those teams and sort of collaborating with them. And you know, of course, I was the I did this in early in my career as well. I was the one that said, hey, you need to build this feature or you need to do x or why. So it was certainly trial and error on my part that I wasn't able to get my point across by using that approach. So I think I just credit my sort of my history with collaborating with product teams and sort of my own discovery to figuring that out. Yeah, your background is sales and account management. But clearly, as as we read in the at the you know, the introduction of the show your responsibilities. You know you're you seem to be thriving at q and your responsibilities now include a bunch of things that you I don't think, based on the bio that you've run before, like marketing, for example. What's your pro and yet you're doing incredibly well. And so which is which is a testament both to well, it's testament to you and your skills and how you approach these...

...things. So what is so how do you approach them? Let's say you're you know, you're rising to the CEA suite. You're inheriting a new function or discipline that you don't have experience providing oversighter management of before. What's your strategy from making sure that all of the things you're responsible for continue to operate excellently? So great question. And so I think the first step is, I'm very honest with my CEO and my executive team as well as you know, a new team that I inherit, what I know and what I don't know about that that functional discipline. And so marketing as a great example, where I certainly, you know, collaborated closely with my marketing counterparts at Crubhub, but beyond sort of that collaboration, have very little direct experience in that and so I think the first is when you take on a team that you don't have a ton of experience you know, be humble, be vulnerable, be honest about what you you know what value you can and can't add. Then I spent a lot of time trying to leverage external expertise. There's a lot of great marketing books out there you can read. You know, I remember being part of revenue collective. I was able to reach out to Andrea Koll and get lunch with her and a couple of people on my marketing team to just talk shop, and it's those experiences and learning that has allowed me to build more functional knowledge. I think what I've also found is if you are a strong people leader, you are able to empower your functional leads to really grow and blossom. And so I think number one learning and leveraging that external expertise, but I think really leveraging the people on the team and pushing them in, challenging them so that they can get to that next level, even if you're not exactly sure what that is, but you know that they have that background where they can get there. They just need to be, you know, empowered or managed effectively to do it. My fear when I was running marketing teams like a live stream was I was always worried that I didn't have enough to teach the people that I was trying to hire and I worried that they would need somebody like an Andrea Kale to learn from for them to for to make it like a great place for them to work. But maybe your perspective is if you can just be the right kind of leader, it's not as much of an issue. Yeah, I completely agree. And then the last point that I'll make on this is what's been most fascinating to me at q. This is the first time I've really managed every team that touches the customer. It gives you a much better perspective on the customer journey, you know. So when I was managing account management, I was all about account management. I had tunnel vision. I was just focused on doing what I needed to do to make my function the best and potentially even at the expense of the sales org or another org, just because I didn't take the time to really appreciate, I think, that perspective as well. So I think what's really powerful and I think what a lot of company should continue to think about, is creating sort of silos of independent teams. I think can inhibit progress and I think what we've seen is by bringing us sort of together as part of the same org we've been able to identify problems more quickly, we've been able to collaborate on solutions more effectively. So, just from like an organ design perspective, that's been a really interesting takeaway from me. Yeah, aligning around the customers sounds so simple and yet proves to be so difficult for so many organizations. One of the things you would suggested a podcast title when we were sort of preparing for this conversation, and one of them was how a new approach to leadership will cultivate a new generation of women leaders. Walk us through what you when you were proposing that title for this,...

...for this interview. What did you mean and why was it? Why was it specific to women, because I'm always really interested in making sure that there's appropriate representation and diversity at all levels of every organization, including the executive level. So what is this new approach to leadership and why will it and how will it impact, you know, women, female leadership? It's a great question, I think, as I've grown as a leader, and especially at Q, since it's happened so quickly and my scope has really increased, you know, pretty dramatically from a couple of years ago, I can't really be anybody but myself and just generally I, you know, wear my heart on my sleeve. I'm extremely empathetic, I'm honest to a fault. You know, I'm I can be very vulnerable with how I'm feeling about something and I believe, you know, I have very strong communication skills and I think the combination of those things make me an effective people leader, regardless of the actual functional discipline. And I think, you know, when you think of the stereotypical you know leader, you typically think of adjectives like authoritative or bold or you know. You even have all of these stories about founders that can be a little angsty or can be, you know, a little crazy or intense, and I have seen a lot of success in my career in adopting some of these you know qualities that I personally believe just come more naturally to women and I think we're at a really interesting time where more and more people are starting to talk about this and beginning to, you know, be more vulnerable, you know lead with compassion or kindness, and I think that you can still achieve, you know, amazing business outcomes while adopt doing that leadership style and because that style, in my opinion, is a little bit sort of more conducive to how women are. I think that this is an opportunity for women to really step up, be themselves, not try and fit into the stereotypical box that has existed in the past, and show that that approach can create and sustain and grow successful businesses. I love it. I completely agree with you, Megan. We're coming to the end of our time together and what we like to do, which you've sort of already done, but we like to kind of understand your influences, what books you're reading, what people have impacted you. You've mentioned nic course work, you've mentioned drive by Daniel Pink a book called the tyranny of metrics, but walk us through some other influences for people that have impacted you. What are books that you're reading or content you're consuming that you think we should know about because you found them inspiring or they've helped inspire you in some way. Absolutely so. I think I recently met David Olk. He founded were Ay, and we just have like an hour long conversation at a we a dinner, but I still remember that so well and he gave me so much great advice around, you know, how to manage up effectively, how to take on more to, you know, set yourself up for career growth and development and things that, you know, I've been implementing in the last six months that I think and have really helped me continue to move my career forward. He's also hilarious and just fun to have a drink with, which is a quality I appreciate. And people. And then some of the books I've read recently. I just finished that book. Never split the difference by Chris boss, Great Negotiation Book. He's been on the show. I noticed that I was when I was scanning through some little sales hacker podcast titles. But yeah, so I'd say that that's the book I read most most recently. Awesome, Megan, folks out there listening. Maybe they want to work at Q, maybe they want to reach out to you for some inspiration. What's the best way to connect with you?...

You can find me on Linkedin. I've been trying to be more active recently and share from my experience, so that's probably the best way to get me. Are you trying to post once a day? Is that your goal, or tell us about like, what your your goals are around linkedin posting? I'm posting once a week right now. I think with with anything new, my rule of thumb is to keep it really simple so you actually follow through with the idea that you have. My concern about committing to a daily post is that I would fall off the wagon or I would potentially post content that, you know, I could throw together quickly but maybe wasn't as valuable. So I'm starting weekly and I'm also just trying to add my thoughts or comments to other great, you know, influencers on Linkedin who post on a regular basis. So that's my current approach. So we'll see how it plays out. We we support you. We're fans and followers. Megan. Thanks so much for being on the show and we look forward to speaking to you this upcoming Friday or Friday fundamentals. Thanks Sam, everybody and Sam Jacobs. This is SAM's corner. I was so happy to get to interview my friend and revenue collective member, but, more importantly, somebody that's just an incredible professional and executive, Megan Bowen, who is leading operations that managed by Q. I think Megan has a managed her career just exceptionally well and she has command of both the heart skills of metrics and key performance indicators, but also the soft skills, and I think that, you know, one of the things that she's figured out how to do really well that I really think, is a skill that that not all of us really can have internalized, which is the skill of how to manage your own narrative at work to fuel your success. And you know, she points out, consistently doing the right thing and being successful is not enough. You need to make sure that the people around you believe it. It's always fascinating how the same person can be viewed so differently by so many different people, and that's something I personally have experienced. So you have to manage that tension. It's not about promotion or bragging, it's about asserting your perspective. Tell people what you're going to do, do it and then tell people that you did do it what you said you would do right. So it's really just about you know, there's this old adage and sales. Tell them what you're going to tell them. Tell them tell them what you told them, which is the way of presenting information in packets. And Megan is saying that's a that's a formula that you can also use for your career. Right, telling people what you're going to do and that you have a plan. Executives the difference between individual contributors, managers and then executives. Executives need to understand, and one of the things that early VP's don't always understand you've got to bring a plan. It's okay if the plan is an executed but the existence of the plan informs people and tells people that you know what you're doing and that you're working towards some kind of of outcome. So bring the plan, make sure that the plan includes things that you can do, do what you say you were going to do, and then present back on that fact on some kind of retrospective basis. Hey, everybody, we had this plan for Qtwo. Here's how we did. These are the areas where we did really well. These are the areas where we're continuing to work, but make sure that you're summarizing the information upwards. That's not bragging, that is creating the right narrative and it's something that Megan has been exceptional at, in addition to having the impact, because she is somebody that does what she says she's going to do, and there's just been, you know, there's like somebody tweeting about it every single day. Listen, if all you do is what you say you're going to do, you will you will stand out. If you if all you do and listen to this says, wherever you're listening to this, on the treadmill, out on a run, walking your dog, whatever it is, if you just if you are somebody that says I will send you that proposal tonight and all you do is every time you do send them that proposal tonight, you will stand out, because most people say I will follow up with you and get it done...

...today and then they don't do it. That is most people. So all you have to do is what you say you will do. It's just believe that. It's so, so, so, so, so important. Anyway, lecturer is over. Megan's awesome and everything that happens in her career, which I'm sure everybody will be hearing about, is well deserved. She deserves it, she's earned it and she's fantastic. Now, this show has two sponsors that we want to thank. The first is lucid chart. Lucid Chart Sales Solution is the leading account planning platform for modern sales, or so. Thank you, Lucid Chart, and outreach. Thank you as always. Outreach support sales reps by enabling them to humanize communications at scale. To check out the show notes the other other upcoming guests, go to the salespacer website. Please rate the show. Please give us five stars on the ITUNES store. If you want to reach out to me, it's linkedincom. Forward the word in and then forward M F Jacobs and, of course, as you know, I will talk to you next time.

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