The Sales Hacker Podcast
The Sales Hacker Podcast

Episode · 2 months ago

179: Cultural Insight on Operating a Regional Office w/ Paula Shannon

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode of the Sales Hacker Podcast, we have Paula Shannon , Chief Evangelist at Lilt , a machine learning company focused on language translation. Join us for an engaging conversation about language, sales, career success, and embracing cultural differences in leadership.

What You’ll Learn 

- How to open a regional office

- When to use functional heads in lines of reporting

- The importance of understanding company finances

- What has changed in sales over the last two decades

Show Agenda and Timestamps

About Paula Shannon & Lilt [3:02]

The mandate of a chief evangelist [8:10]

Adapting sales processes internationally [12:02]

2 recent changes in consumers and sales [19:14]

Advice to today’s young workers [23:47]

Paying it forward: Shout-outs [30:03]

Sam’s Corner [34:11]

One two one: Three: Three: O Everybody at Sam Jacobs, welcome to theSales Hacker podcast today on the show we've got Pauli, Shannon Paul's, thechief evangelist at Lil twitches, a machine learning company focus onlanguage, translation, really quol company. She brings over thirty fiveyears of sales experience a leadership experience both at public or privatecompanies. It's a great conversation, she's also accomplished linguist andreally knows a lot about our companies should expand regionally to make surethat you maximize your growth. So it's a great conversation before we getthere. We have three sponsors we want to think. The first is out. Reachoutrage has been a long time sponsored this podcast and were excited toannounce that their annual road show series unly summit series is back inperson. This fall in Austin, Chicago San Francisco, New York, city andLondon. This year's theme is the rise of revenue. Innovators join a new COhorde of revenue leaders who are transforming the world of buying andselling by arming their sellers with a single, unified engagement andintelligence platform, get more details, saviour spot at summit, dot, outrageDario, and do it fast because tickets are limited, were also brought to youby pavilion. Pavilion is the key to getting more out of your curer. Ourprivate membership connects you with the network of thousands of like mindedfears and resources where you can tap into leaders of opportunities, training,mentorship and other services made for high growth leaders like you, whereveryou are at in your career. If you're new to your career join the analystcommunity, if you're at the senior levels and you've achieved the VP title,join the executive community and take one of the courses that pavilion offers,including frontline manager, school chief, Revenoit, School Chief MarketingOfficer School and over ten, more full programs, replete with certifications,learn more at join pavilion. And finally, we want a thank air call arecalls a cloud based voice platform that ingrates seamlessly with popularproductivity and help dest tools from call Monera and whispering integrationswith your serum and real time. Analytics Er call can help turbo chargeyour sales reproductive ty set a new standard for sales, productivity andperformance by switching to a phone system. That's best friends with yourserum get twenty percent off your first three months at air call at Air CallSales Hacker Com. That's all one word: Air Call Sales Hacker Com. Now withoutfurther ado. Let's listen! My conversation with Polishin Heverybody, its Sam Jacobs, welcome tothe Sales Hacker podcast today were excited to welcome Paul. A Shannon tothe show Paula is the chief evangelist at Lilt, and let me tell you a littlebit about her background. She has well over twenty years of sale's experience.She served as chief sales officer in SPP from nineteen ninety nine tothousand seventeen at Lyon, Ridge running their six hundred milliondulberry sales team from two thousand and eight to eleven. She acted as theCO gentle manager of the core business managing over twenty eight hundredemployees across the world and delivering profit on a three hundredmillion dollar piano. She drove new services in sustainable solutions,developed to teach accounts and insured the continued delivery of innovationand execution excellence to global one thousand. Customers. She's alsopreviously served on the board of...

...several Montreal technology startupsand is also served on the board a fit figured if I can pronounce this rightway. The Fond Reginald de Solidarite F t q ill De Montreal, which is a venturefund arm of the eight and a half billion dollar Fon e Cela der Te. TheTraveler de Quebec Development Capital, Fun, polly you'll tell me if I figuredthat out. If I said that the right way she's got a deep background. More thanthirty years of industry experienced in languages, including ten years insenior rolls with burlet's international in California, WashingtonDC in Canada, she's fluent in English, French and Dutch and functional inGerman, Spanish and Russia, educated in Canada, Belgium and the US shields of B,a and Russian and German, with a minor in linguistics from McGill University,Paula welcomed to the show sand. Thank you. I'm happy to be here today withyou, thanks for having me so did I pronounce tell me about the fund thatyou worked at for Montreal. Did I pronounce that correctly? How do youyou were? You were frighteningly what those you were being on so yeah. Thatwas, I mean you did a great job. It said Motul, though I am even even inFrench, and they always love the Hyphens, but essentially it's a pensionfund at the court right. The FT Q, which is so it's a solidarity fund, aPension Fund for workers for Quebec Workers and then the small fund wasthere for a into having a venture capital fund kind of someone that wouldinvest more and start up technology, etc. So we can certainly talk aboutthat at a later point in the interview, but you can always imagine that a corepension fund that looks at you know how many jobs do we create? What kind ofyou know, expansion of factories? Do we create, might have a hard time thinkingabout venture financing where you know the goal was not necessarily to becreating seats and jobs right, it was to create value yeah. Well, it shouldthat we may get into that, but first we also want to make sure that we give youan opportunity to tell us about Lilt, and also your role is chief evangelist.So what is lit give us a little bit of background on the company, because it'sa really interesting company yeah thanks for that chance. It really is. Imean it is just the the most innovative company I've worked with in my entirecareer, so wilt has proprietary technology in the field of translationtechnology. They've created machine translation, so you think of automatictranslation. The founders of Lilt had worked. One will completing a PhD atStanford. The other is supervisor also at Stanford, but now full professor atBerkeley, and they were working within the Google translate team, so born ofthat was kind of if you will hem almost the next generation approach to usingautomated technology with language and so lilt o expanded initial rounds withZeta and then with sequoia, and they expanded to include services. So it's atruly innovative firm that combines human in the loop translators,linguists powered by this innovative,...

...automated machine translationtechnology that is both adaptive and predictive, meaning it learns from thehuman at a very deep level. So, who do you sell to tell me about the thebusiness model for Lilt? Well? What's exciting? Is that they're, fearless andso really able to sell to other startups? I mean, I think, you're,probably so familiar with that Sam. You know that working within the portfolioshe've been introductions and crossovers, but they got well about their weight,so they've sold to a number of just large global firms, including Intelwhere they swooped in and were able to win their global business, and itoffered such an incredibly innovative solution that until capital took a lookand then came on board for their series B. So that's a that's the kind of dreamscenario that any entrepreneur founder would love to find themselves in andyou can imagine from there it's just it's a range of some of the toptechnology firms top startups and initially I think that they werefocused more on tech and BBC tech companies, but they've really refinedtheir integrated model with services and technology and they're able to dosome pretty demanding kinds of content like financial services and evenmedical devices, and pharmaceutical awesome. Amazing and, as chief ofangelest, would tell us about what you're what your mandate is. Well, mymandate, really, I mean it's funny in a way I find some of it's looking in thepast, because obviously my experience in the years that I have spent in thelanguage services industry is attractive for little. So fundamentally,I'm there to make connections and to truly advocate for them, so there mighthave been customers initially who are skeptical about using automatedtechnology. You know, there's a conundrum. You know con humans do thisbetter. Most people understand automated technology from maybe a poorexperience with something like a Google translate and the reality when you puta human in the center, is that it's like a self driving car? I think thehuman could drive the car all the time. They could also decide when it's betterto let the artificial intelligence take over. That's precisely what little hasbuilt. So I think I act as an advocate. I certainly make connections to peoplehelp them also make the jump from maybe an evaluation framework they'recomfortable with to a way or lens or perspective that lets them. Look atlits approach to this process, which is which is very different, and I do a lotof outreach writing and webinars and that type of thing, Sam, amazing. Let'stalk about how you got here, you know I read your bio and you have a richbackground and in languages you also spend a long time with bulets, but tellus about a little bit about your career. You know, you've had so many differentexperiences. What were some of the...

...formative experiences and how did youultimately? Because you have a rich sales background? How did you translateyour language background into sales acumen to help companies grow? Ohthanks. That's a that's a fun one to tackle. I guess breaking it down. I'dsay that my background. As you say, it was languages at an academic level. Ihad one taken languages in linguistics at university, but I always had two other areas where I was verycurious and also working, and so I worked summers as a paced up artist inthe sense doing desktop publishing at Newspaper and magazine PublishingCompany, and then I also had minor level courses in computer sciences. Iwas a Routen N, twenty eight baby, my dad grew up in the teche boom inMassachusetts. Long before there was Silica Valley Right, there was rotunetwenty eight, so those things didn't go together at all. When I was I enteringuniversity language was still very literary, and then I had the computerpiece and the publishing well. I got really lucky because after starting mycareer with Berlitz, where they had a classic management training program, soI was the beneficiary of just incredible investment in teaching youabout operations, finance management, HR sales for sure and marketing. Youhad a chance to then go out and run a region. A set of offices set of regionsand bulets as well, was expanding at the same time going from kind ofconsumer document translation if you will to being forced to consider how toserve the needs of a blossoming technology industry that was prettyhungry for some global translation services. So all of a sudden softwarelocalization became really the biggest growth area in the translation market,and now my computer science background, my desktop publishing and contentcoupled with six languages seems almost you know like it was planned, but Iassure you it was not. It was a complete accident as most of the bestthings in life usually are wow. I think in some of the a the research that I'vedone and some of the information you provided. You really are an expert andkind of not just selling but adapting sales and sales process to culturaldifferences around the world. Did your language interest and background helppropel that expertise? Absolutely. Yes, that's exactly what happened so you'dasked how I got into sales, I mean as a general manager in the briles model.You need to be responsible for sales and when I first expanded my career inthe industry, I I guess I started as a global account manager and then aregional sales manager, and then you know worked my way up to VP and then atline bridge just on a chief revenue,...

...chief sales officer and so working anddoing training hiring. I realized that my knowledge of languages and mycomfort in different cultures and traveling around the world was a hugebenefit and there were an awful lot of firms coming in those days out of thestates, especially technology and software, of, as almost all centered inthe US and foisting their approach on the regional offices or other countries,and early on it, took a very different approach to respect and kind of mind.You know what was different and unique in that market and try to find a way totake proven sales methodologies that that are valuable and do work. You knowthe basics of needs: satisfaction, the basics of customer centricity, even thebasics on some level of challenging, but adapting it for that, given marketor culture, and I just found that to be so much fun and, of course, theregional offices lostened with that approach, because itwas something that they hadn't been offered before. There's a a lot ofchallenges that companies face when they try to take their existing salesprocess and really their existing go to market process and simply apply it to anew country. What do you see is the biggest the biggest challenges andobstacles and what some of the advice that you give companies that want toopen a new office in London? Maybe they want to open on office and Mumbai?Maybe they want to open an office in Paris and there are culturaldifferences. How do you? How do you help those companies adapt or if youwere to give advice to those companies? What would you what advice? Would youoffer? Oh, that's that I mean that's such a big question, but let likethinking about this just in a level maybe of my own experience. I thinkthat one of the things I would advise against. I was never a great fan of having expatriots be kind of the leader or the manager. It's a short cut. You knowit's comfortable, maybe back twenty years ago it was, it was kind of thedefault because it was very difficult. You know to find truly global citizensthat were also perhaps adept in your line of work or service. It just setsthe wrong tone. I mean, if you're, if you truly, are ready to invest in aregion or a low cow, far better to take the time to hire slowly, someone whorepresents the absolute culture bridge that you're trying to create and havethat local person, or at least that regionally local person run the showfor you otherwise, you're right, I mean Sam. It just becomes a clone of yourcentral or your domestic operation and it bleeds into everything you do. Itmeans you're going to be pushing not just US or wherever your company'sheadquarters, you're, going to push your internal processes onto a newmarket, you're going to be less likely to be open, minded about adapting yourproduct or service, and I think these days you now when we look at customerexperience, I'm so jazzed because we're...

...finally entering an era where there's anotional idea of a global customer experience officer were kind of globalcx o and what we find is so few companies really look at what theexperience is across the entire by or life cycle for all of their regions andlocal. So, yes, my experience in North America might be. I have these touchpoints in my journey, but the German client may already be failing becausefour or five of those touch points don't even exist in their market. So Ithink, if you're not ready to go global and open an office partner, you knowcollocate do something: that's maybe a half way measure. But if you are ready,then you shouldn't be ready to hire locally and staff locally. One of thechallenges that people exactly to your point, the challenges that company'sfaces they feel like. If they don't have the expat running the office, theylose. What they think is special about their company, which might be theculture at the same time. If they bring on somebody completely, you know, butto the point. Maybe they can't adapt to the local culture as well, and there'salways also a question of functional reporting lines, and is it better tohave the head of the European office and all of the different desperateresponsibilities and functions, marketing sales, product report to aregional head, or maybe there's a global head? And you know you gotsomebody working in London. That's reporting back to somebody in New York,even though, in the time zone they're dealing with challenges that only theirteam in London can help solve. Do you have a point of view on or chart andorganizational design and that reality? Oh, I mean yeah, because I've probablyexecuted limitless number of flawed organizational plans. You know alongthose lines I think Sam. It is just an absolute pendulum that is alwaysswinging back and forth, but not where you want it at the moment. You know youjust start constantly evolving. So to be more specific and answer yourquestion, I think, if you're in an environment where control is paramount,meaning cost your thin margin, growth is not the story. Compliance is perhapspart of your DNA. Then a kind of geographic command and controlorganization makes a lot of sense because you're going to be managing allof the leases. You know HR issues, the things that hygiene, the corporatehygiene, is going to be perfect if growth and culture are more the focusthan I think, the pain of having a functionally aligned organization,meaning sales reports into regional sales or or product line sales, andthen rolls up globally marketing the same thing. It's a much more richorganization and going back to the very first point youmade, it is very hard to hire locally and it is really hard to Adoptin teinculcate your culture with a local person, but it is what is needed andit's so much more valuable than having...

...a cookie cutter x, Pat Approach. That'sone of the things that you've mentioned is just sort of the evolution ofcustomer experience, but you know: you've worked in so many differentcapacities. You've worked at Berlitz. You've worked at. I think it's calledLion Bridge you're now at a early stage company. What do you think is changedthe most about how people buy and how companies sell over the last. You knowone or two decades. No, that's that's great. I think two things. If I'mlooking at this different axes, you know one is a just the consumerist ion ofeverything. So the demand is that used to be present only in real BC.Companies. You know who were directly interacting with their consumer are noweverywhere, because we expect to interact with B to be experiencesshould be as seamless and flawless as our BC experiences in our private liferight. So we have that expectation. So that's kind of behaviorally, I think,what's really changed and when I impose global language and culture on that itmeans you know. It really has to be that same level of ease of interactionthat I might have with a big brand like an Amazon or an Ebay in my bbinteractions, and then the second is technology, and I think that when I wasfirst starting out a broad range of languages for a given product, you knowin the early days Microsoft Windows was in four languages, which was just hugeright IBM used to do to. Then you had peripherals and devices like printersand you quickly went out to ten languages, and then there was a goldenmoment where anybody like a Hewlett Packard, a compact early days, Dell, anHP. They were issuing their products and forty plus languages for fifty,let's say, and then all of a sudden mobile devices come along smartphones.No, he eludes the pack with language and boom, there's not a product, that'sreleased, that is not eighty to ninety languages base and then Microsoft withgames and the next generation of mobile devices takes that almost table stakesnumber up to about a hundred and twenty seven. So now you have consumers aroundthe globe, who absolutely demand and get access to technology in their locallanguage, sometimes even regional languages, and so they've puttremendous pressure on experience that they expect at bigger brands. So it'skind of crazy because you had a mobile device available in a hundred languages,but you might have had back then British Airways online, with presenceavailable only in ten languages. So there was a huge gap and that's closedquite quickly. Now amazing yeah, it really is fascinating. You've got a lotof really interesting perspectives on growth and one of one of the theperspectives that you have, as you know in this in this environment that we'recurrently and were capital is abundant...

...and companies are so fixated onbecoming the next. You know even beyond Unicorn a decachord. Your perspectiveis sometimes this growth mandate is a real impediment, is a real challengeand it can really sabotage. You know the health of a company talk a littlebit about your perspective and what you've seen when people have a growthat all cost mandate. It's very hard Sam to see that, because I have toconstantly ask myself, you know: Is this a valid observation that I'mhaving or is it me being out of sync and out of step, because I haven't beensuccessful at that or didn't didn't? You know flourish in that environment,so jury still out on whether it's my own personal weakness or a really goodconviction. But I do see this and I find it sad and what I'm talking aboutis that you know that growth groes at any cost. You know so, let's say you'rein an early stage: investment, maybe VC somewhere. You know certainly series aor B and your partner, your investor, is putting enormous pressure on youwith all of the cliche. Is You know we're going to keep you lean so thatyou, you know you innovate. You've got to grow x per cent or you're not goingto be interesting. So the reason I find that sad is that sometimes there aregreat ideas that need to have kind of percolate a bit and change in a debt.They need experience and they need a little bit of time or you know you'retrying to catch a big fish. Sometimes you don't reel that fish in right away.You tease the line a little bit. Well, the the investors are looking at thisin a completely different way right. They understand that a certain numberof their investments in a given portfolio will fail and they want toget to success as quickly as possible. So what's good for the investor may notbe good for the entrepreneur or the founder who's push to reece faster thanis natural and ines up. Failing because of that, so I don't know what thesolution to that is. You know it's a function of the capital markets, but itis sad to watch when it happens completely agree with you Paula. Youknow you've had such an incredible career. One of the questions before wego that I would love to dive into is just your advice. You know your advicefor, for maybe yourself were you to enter the workforce. You know in twothousand and twenty one for people that are new to their sales career. What's tadvice that you give to to young people that are just entering their beginning,their careers as they look at navigating a twenty or thirty yearcareer and hopefully finding the same level es success that you have well,it's such a fun thing to be able to do with people who are really receptive,and I just I don't think, there's anything I enjoy more than coaching andbeing involved. I think that's why it's so fun working at lit right now,because they are incredibly young right, just nimble, agile problem solvers, butI often find that I want to give the advice. You know that it's completelyhealthy and appropriate to not be focused on that trajectory. I find thata lot of people are so hyper focused on...

...the perfect line. That's going up tothe right hand corner of their career. You know that every job change has tobe a salary increase. You know a promotion, the title increase andthey're often very afraid to try things or to experiment, and I think the thingthat I learned the most is that detours and even steps backwards, certainlystep sideways are some of the most important things you could do so. As Isaid, when I first entered software localization, it didn't even exist onsome level stepping out of bulets core business, which was managing languageschools and publishing materials. You know CD, ROMs and books looked kind ofsilly like. Why would you not want to be in the core business and jumpingover to this new kind of peripheral activity? I wound up being a brilliantthing to do, but it could have failed and then the other thing is. I had anamazing opportunity in two thousand and eight to step out off sales and to takeon with a CO general manager, the running of the entire three hundredmillion dollar piano at Lyon, bridge for all of their translation servicesbusiness. So I preched for that. I did some external training and leadershipskills and boom I'm ready to go and the downturn hits the crash hits. So itprobably wouldn't have been offered to me as an opportunity. Had we been indistress at the time, but once in the job we had no choice. We had to figureout a way to you know: cut costs, lay people off the business had a thirtytwo percent downturn in revenue within the space of three or four weeks inJanuary of two thousand and nine it was. It was l. You know we all went throughthis. We all know what it was like, but it was just horrendous, and so Ilearned a lot from that. I learned that sometimes these detours are the mostimportant thing and then the final answer, Sam coming out of that, Irealized how important it is to understand how your company makes moneyand if you haven't, had the fundamental training, an MBA background and financeget it somehow. Whether you do a university kind of you know:Certificate Program, you take a finance for non financial managers. I mean it'snot that hard. You know you need to just be able to go beyond operationsand a p NL level knowledge and really understand how your board is looking atit, how your investors are looking at it. So I was really lucky that in thelast five ten years of my career, I sat as a as a management representative.You know, within our Public Company Board, I interacted with our board andparticipated in the number of very large mergers and acquisitions that ledup to the sale of my brage to private equity. I learned so much in thatprocess about how other people, outside of the sales and marketing functionlook at revenue and Growth, and I never...

...would have been in a position to dothat. If I hadn't both start my finance knowledge. That is such an importantpoint and you know we talked about it before we were recording and somethingthat we actually teach. In My my company pavilion. We have. TheSIEROSZEWSKI is called a theory of enterprise value, because so many salesleaders just do not. They don't have a fundamental understanding of how valueis created and how that translates into money. And I think that's if you don'thave that understanding. It just really limits your upside in terms of yourexecutive potential, you are going to be putting on a very different personawhen you interact at the highest levels of your career, with a board or withinvestors. So it's a fine line, because there is, of course a need for you arerepresenting the optimism about making a stretch number or a revenue growth.But at the moment that you are in that door room, they are going to prizepragmatism, mastery of the numbers and just kind of more. You know lessselling and more kind of informing, and I think that this is where there's anopportunity to just work on you on your persona, have that right persona at theright time, charismatic sales leader in the field with your people- i Ha yesabsolutely, but in the boardroom. You better know your stuff. If you presentdata understand that you will need to present it again with an update end ora retroactive trend and speak in facts speak in actual, you know, as opposedto being emotional, and I think that that is not kind of a side swipe. Youknow that women are more emotional in the sales field. They are not, but I dothink they have to battle that preconception, and so, if you want toget to the highest levels, the sand, what you're offering through pavilionis exactly what people who want to be future leaders. You need to understandand know and then stop selling and start participating as an executive. Atthat level, it's a great advice: Paula, we're almost at the end of our timetogether, and what we like to do in this last little bit is kind of pay. Itforward a little bit and figure out who are people? What is content? It couldbe books that you've read. It could be bosses that you've had. It could becolleagues that you've had just ideas or humans that you think we should knowabout that. If influenced you that you'd like us to to be aware of when Iframe it like that who comes to mind who are some of the ideas or books thatyou think we should know about that, have had a big impact on you. Well oneof the first and I didn't prep for this, so I hope I get the name right. It'sthe six lessons from private equity that every firm can use. I think that'sthe title could look it up. It's a McKenzie publication that is reallysmall. It's a quick read and it's a it's just such a great book. We hadtaken a look at it as a public company prior to going through the privateequity process, to challenge ourselves and to say like W. Well, why don't wemean to do this? You know why. Why is...

...it that someone from outside is goingto be able to transform us? Why wouldn't we be able to do it ourselves?And while there are loads of reasons why you know that that is, there were anumber of lessons that I took away from that, and I almost wished that I hadread it earlier in my career I would have, I would have been better off and the other one is a group that I workedwith. I don't want to do a commercial, but I wouldn't I be remiss if I didn'tput points out how amazing these these guys in this team, where it's a groupcalled sales benchmarking index. I don't know if you know of them, haveyou ever worked with US beyond? I am aware of them and you know we've had.Actually, my companies have had partnership conversation, so I'm prettyfamiliar with this being, but well. I just have nothing but good things tosay about the journey that we went on together so round. One of discussingpotential exits with private equity was difficult. The fact that we had threerounds Sam, probably tells you what you need to know it wasn't smooth. It wasvery hard round too. We brought in an I brought in sales benchmarking index tohelp with a fundamental talent review from bottom zap of the entireorganization, and it was a very scary thing to do. I mean I honestly felt itwas a fifty fifty chance that I would be in my job at the end of this process,but I also felt so committed to the company and the journey we been on thatif we didn't do that, we weren't going to actually be able to get where weneeded to go, and I just found that the professionalism they brought to doingreviews of individuals, territory, planning, bottoms up compensationplanning, just overhauling all of the kind of last mile of the business wasamazing. I love it. Paula we're going to talk to on Friday for Fridayfundamentals, but if folks want to are listening and want to reach out, maybethey're inspired. Maybe they have some questions. Are you open to contact fromthe outside world and of so what's your preferred method of communication? Oh,I definitely am, and yes very, very much so emails easiest Paula at liltcom. I mean that's pretty simple right. So that's extremely simple! I love it!That's that so for me, that would be the easiest and then from there youknow we could figure it out, but one of the things I missed the most about myjob s, so at a huge company, was the opportunity to be out with new processand customers launching new products and learning you know about thesedifferent businesses, so you think about language, you're touching so manydifferent kinds of companies. You know from products and tech to burberyclothing, to Royal Caribbean cruise lines, and it was amazing to see allthe different business challenges that they had around global and be part of ateam that would solve them. So I missed that. So if someone comes out- and theygot some good questions that would just get my brain working again, I wouldreally love it. Amazing, Paula you've been a great guest thanks, so much forbeing our guest on the sales hacker...

...podcast and we're going to talk to onFriday for Friday fundamentals that sounds great than Sam. I really enjoyedit. Thank you. Everybody at Sam Jacobs, Sam's cornerthe end of the show. I love that conversation with Palasan a couplereally important things that I think she said that I just want to controlthe and control you right. The first is: She has a strong point of view on howto open a regional office. Traditionally, it's send somebody fromHome Office. Have them open the office, they know the culture, they know howyou do things they can tell the Brits or the French or the Indians or theChinese or wherever you're doing your new office. They can tell them how it'sdone and Paulias don't do that find a really talented local representative,and that way you can make sure that the office is adapted to the local cultureand that from the beginning, the company recognizes that it needs tomake some modifications to how it does business moget do business with thepeople in that country where they feel respected and acknowledged for theirdifferences for what is unique about their culture. She also said you know,it really depends if you're solving for profit or you're solving for growth,you're solving for growth, you still may want functional heads, meaning SDRreport to a global head of sales. Development may be in the Home Office,maybe the sales people report up through a riginal sales head and thento the head of global sales, whereas marketing people report to a possiblyregional marketing person, but maybe they report to the Global MarketingPerson. So the gain there's sort of two differences, there's two possibilities:one is there's a head of the London office and everybody reports into thatperson with dotted lines to the functional heads and then there'sanother world where all of the different functional heads report tothe global head and at a dot of line to may be the office manager of the officelate. So all the things it depends on what you're solving for growth orprofit if you're solving for growth do fer back to the global head offunctional responsibilities, if you're solving for profit may be just have aGM of BA that everybody reports into second things, she said, or a secondpoint that I would just like to underscore s just to how do companiesmake money, and we talked about it- A lot in pavilion. I just would encourageeverybody to be out there that, if you're listening, if you're thinking,you want to be a great sale later, you want to be co n day. You want to be achief revenant officer. You have to understand how value is created withinyour Organis. It sounds obvious. I understand you know what's tounderstand Sam, I get it. We sell software they face for the software,but if you don't, if you understand profit right, not just revenuegeneration but profit, ebitda earnings before interest taxes, depreciationAmovisti, if you don't understand the financial performs to the company,which is to generate free cash, it is not necessarily just a grow top linerevenue. It is to generate free cash over time. If you don't understand thatyou're going to pay people too much, you are going to have compensation aplant that don't aline with the grow through the business you are going toover staff. You are going to misunderstand the fundamentalperformance of how your company grows and generates profit, and so justsomething that every executive needs to know at some point one way or the otherand Paula really made that point and brought it home. So great comments,great conversation, I really enjoyed...

...speaking with her now before we go. Ofcourse we want to think our sponsors, of course, outreach. The unly summitseries is coming to a number of incredible cities, including AustinChicago San Francisco, New York. In London to get your tickets at summitthat average a dio, if you haven't signed up for a pavilion membership,you haven't taken front my manator school sales at toleration, school orSDR good camp. Any of those programs make sure you do so unlock yourprofessional potential and become that person that you want to be at JointPavilion and finally, Air Call Head on over to Air Call Sales Hacker Com toget twenty percent off your first three months. Finally, if you're, not amember of the sales soccer community, yet you're missing out over twenty fivethousand professionals are in there asking and answering questions it's agreat community of like mind. It sales professions go to sales, hacker s youhaven't given us five stars. Please do so. If you want to get in touch with me,email me, Sammich, Joan Pavilion Com and otherwise I'll talk to you nexttime. I.

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