The Sales Hacker Podcast
The Sales Hacker Podcast

Episode · 6 months ago

153. Don't Learn on the Job w/ Paul Fifield

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This week on the show, we welcomed Paul Fifield, the founder and CEO of Sales Impact Academy. We dive deep into how investing in learning is one of the best ways to drive sales effectiveness, and why learning programs in the profession of sales and marketing,have not existed to date. We also talk about how that's hindered our professional development, particularly because sales is such a tough job.

What You’ll Learn

  1. Fred's Floors and other startup ideas that didn't make it
  2. Why learning on the job is a horrendous idea (but we do it all the time)
  3. How people process information
  4. Why starting your own business isn't a get-out-jail-free card

Predictable revenue

Show Agenda and Timestamps

  1. Show Introduction [00:49]
  2. Fred's Floors and other startup ideas that didn't make it [7:02]
  3. Why learning on the job is a horrendous idea [13:20]
  4. How people process information [17:44]
  5. Why starting your own business isn't a get-out-jail-free card [24:02]
  6. Predictable revenue [26:58]
  7. Sam’s Corner [31:26]


 

Everybody, it's Sam Jacobs and beforejumping in to what you're about to listen to I'd, be remissed not to tellyou about unly, two thousand and twenty one on May. Eleven through thirteenthwere focusing on how to win all together in the new sales era. You'lllearn new, go to market strategies, get deeper, funnel insights and actionabletakeaways for your entire organization, from revenue, leaders at high growstartups and fortune. Five hundred companies and Oure very special guestsare none other than Guy Ras podcaster and author of how I built this andcarry laurence. The first female figher pilot in the US Navy come save yourseat for this high energy online event at unlitot out reach Datao one two one.Three: Three oeverybody at Sam Jacobs, welcome to the sale, sacker podcastOday on the show. We've got Paul Feifield. He is the founder and C at Eoof sales impact academy, and we dive deep into how investing in learning isone of the best ways to drive sales effectiveness and why learning programsin the profession of sales and marketing have not existed to date andhow that's been such a hindrance to all of our professional development,particularly because sales is such a tough job. So it's a really goodconversation before we get there. I want to think out reach our sponsor forthis week. Outreach has been a long time sponsor the podcast and they justlaunched a new way to learn. Outreach on outreach is the place to learn howoutrich does outreach Wen how the team follows up with every lead, ind recordtime after virtual events, turms them into revenue. You can also see howOurech runs account. Base plays manages repped in so much more using their ownsales engagement platform, everything's, backed up by data pulled fromoutreached processes and their customer base, when you're done you'll be ableto do it as good as they do head to out reached out io forward slsh on outrageto see what they have going on. I'm trying to think of T at I don't haveany other anouncements right now. If you haven't by the way, joined thesaleshacker community. I really do...

...think you should do that. So so that'ssomething one! One less announcement, any salls professional can join thesales hacker community is Amember to ask questions, get immediate answersand share experiences with, like minded be tobcls professionals, jump in andstart a discussion with more than ten thousand sales professionals at sales,hackercom all right. Let's Ossen my conversation with Taugt everybody at Sam Jacob's, welcome tothe sales hacker podcast to day. We are excited to have on the show a goodfriend of mine and the CEOF a really exciting new company. His name is Paul.Fifield Paul is a bin around the black entrepreneur, with over six eighteenyears, experience in founding and scale ING global companies. Over the lasteight years alone, he has grown to international technology, businessesfrom zero to seventy million dollars in combined sales as Ciro and hundreds ofmillions of dollars in value. Paul has also raised over one hundred milliondollars of investment across all stages, from seed to growth, venture capitaland debt. Currently he is the CEO and founder of Sales Impact Academy. Callwelcome to the show hey s'm great to be here. We're excited to have you so the Plat you're welcome the the placewe like to start is that what we call your baseball card yeah if you're notfamiliar with that as a Brit, people made baseball cards and they hadinformation about the player on the back of the car, their batting average,and things like that. Okay. So this is like a quick snapshot, but really whatwe try to do is understand more about your company and where they are in thegross state. So you're the CEO on a thing called sales impact academy. Whatis sales impact academy, so sals impact academy is salls education as a service,and so essentially, what it is is a subscription based educationalplatform for B to be sales and markeing teams, and essentially, we've collectedsome of the gind of the world's greatest kind of brains and talent inbpcls marketing. We're creative many many courses over twenty so far growingrapidly all the time and we teach live...

...classes, maybe like two three hours aweek across different learning tracks and we coverd pretty much every pisonalike SDRs, AES leadership, customer success, B, tobe marketing and soon tobe launching rebops, that's exciting, and when did the company is a youngcompany? It's barely out of its toddler face. How old? When did you? When didyou start? It Yeah we're Al to the NAT ace, a so DT diapers ti yeah. We started in October twothousand and nineteen, and that would t like complete geniuses because westarted a remote teaching online learning company about eight weeksbefore this global pandemic thing happened. So that's amazing, goodtiming, Tommy wasn't too bad yeah and how big is the company? How many peopleso we're thirty four people now and we took on of a little bit of investmentback in March last year, just a little convertible loan note from a fantasticvc in the education space called emerge. Education Hetben, absolutely fantastic,but we have just grown revenues really fast. It's been like the pickups beenamazing and we've literally we cashally positive. Most of most of last yearbefore I went and started spending loads of cash again, an and now we'renot. This is onpersonal vacations and mayboxwer. Private Cet Dan WWe were burning cash, AGAINI'M gonna! Stop thisfrivolous frivolous, spend you're flying everywhere in a privatejet that'e made. Well, congratulations on all thesuccess, and recently you announced a pretty big partnership with revenuecollective. If I'm not mistaken, you obviously you're not mistaken Sam,and you know it was probably one of the...

...biggest events, if not tebist event, toreally sort of happen with the company. Thank you very much for partning with us, Sam, it's been, it'sBeenit's been incredible so far and obviously opened up the the kickoff,the annual kickoff with you three or four weeks ago, and just a great just agreat partnership right, I think, just a beautiful coming together Wer we canoffer a ton of vally, for you know, revenue, collective members, you and weget all the benefits of being. You know in partnership with with you guys forat least the next two years, and hopefully I let you noy forever a nextdecade and beyond we're excited. It's been, it's beenabsolutely fantastic for us as well. So let's, let's talk a little bit aboutyour background. You know I read about your. I read your bio, but what was itfirst to just like to know? How did you get into sales and revenue leadershiptols a little bit about your background and then well, of course, well diveinto the founding story for why SELS IMPACT Academy, but first, let's learna little bit more about Paul Cool. I'm like it go right. The wayback. I will just very quickly get right the way back. So when I was atuniversity, I almost ended up foron starting floor sanding business so actually went homewone weekendstanded the floor for my mom really loved it and thought you know what Ithink I could create a massive, because I always think lia little bit too, likebig iws like I go, a huge sanding companies o came back. I came up with aname, I was going to call it Fred's floows and then I had H. I literallywent and designd some leaflets and my cach phrase on these leaflets was:There are no floars in Fred's floors. All rightwhy was it called Fred. IsYour name actually Fred, just elliteration with flows fair? That was it that was it and Iliterally printed five hundred light leaflets with this. You know my geniusphrase, my genious catch phrase and...

...they just sat at the end of my bed forabout three years, and that was it so that was my almost first company, but Ias Ding competer science at university and then in the third year found tout.You could well. People are going ouht into industry and all the people in myclass were like yeah, I' gonna go and do you like Gon a Mun work at Microsoft?I was like. Oh, that sounds horrible. I mean this is back in one thousand, ninehundred and ninetty nine when Microsoft definitely was not cool. Perhaps it'smuch cooler now I was like that sounds terrible, but I found out you couldactually start your own company, so I was like wow. We I'e always wanted todo that so I'l just going to do that hand, I said that actually never wentback, so I kind of I still have to go and finish my my last year ofuniversity and yeah. We started like this web agency, like this Internetthing seems like it's going to be really big yeah like this obviously beon tousand Ninehundre, an nety nine was very, very small and we started thiskind of little web agency, like a couple of guys from the course camewith me, and we started doing building websites for acting agencies, and Iremember the first, the first sight we tried to build. We did a search. Ittook US six months to even like build a searchable Daysto base online, and wedid this. We did it a. We did a search. I remember it. The result took three toa half minutes to GE. To come back. Google has nothing. I you yeah butyway. It started in a very ittlinauspicious way and I had multyou know two or three companies like from thatpoint. Most of them pretty pretty abjent,pretty object, kind of failures and then eventually, through a very kind oflike meandering route, ended up cofoundering, cofounding, cofoundering,CO, founding a Tech Company in New York. An two thousand and eleven called Saros,tell us about Syras that she went well after learning likehow you how not to run companies, so we...

...raised some capital from Greycroftmeand Simon. We had actually ended up merging with with a Greaycroftportfolio company. In the end, we did this pitch though, and Alanm batchcoff, who was maybe I meanhe must be like close to ninety. Now he must have been about eigty back then hefell asleep in the pitch. It was like a. It was a partner's pitch and he waslike at the end of this long table and we had a west coast team on the videoscreen and it was kind of scary because we had flown over from London and yeah.He was just like snoring at the end of the table. I could I could. I had areally like clear view of this sleeping VC and y. It was kind of horrible. Likeafterwayds. I remember Q, talking to my wife and saying I s like how di it go.I was like Wew, wellthe sort of one of the guys fell asleep, but but they gave they stil wrote a bigChack, the Rusht of them ere really leaning in, and they eventually did. It did, InvestYeah and that's been brilliant. So that that's why I began that that's Whyre, Ibegan my sort of journey as sort of tech revenue, leader Adthis Book that Ifound in my sort of desperation, called predictable. Revenue had literally justcome out and I sort of read it covered to cover, and I was like, Oh my God.This is it. You build this str thing and they give leads to the sales teamand they close them, and then you give them to customer success and, like yeah,the I can see like you can build a process, and so I mailed Aaron sayingby offering him a job whilh. He turned me down, but Aron. A marile then did aconsulting Gig for me for nine and a half thousand dollars, because no oneelse really knew much about frickable revenue back then I terms of the book,and so I had this six month, coaching from Maryloon Aaron Back in twothousand and eleven, and that was really this. My sort of journey intounderstanding how to build predictability and a sort of datadriven revenue function and Saras. The...

...category is: Is it content marketing asa content, marketing platform of content management platform, s tar,right, yeah, more, like content marketing? So it's it's a design tool.So it's got a realit's a little bit like sort of a Dobi federshop but kindof in in the cloud kind of like a Canver, but for business in fact Gosh.I do worry that sometimes, when I speak indit just going to get vastly intotrouble, but we had this moment back in for two thousand and fourteenand Thir's huge debate like do, we go be to see what do we say like bterb andit was horrible and tite's lots of lots of stress and eventually it was like.Oh, we should go be to be. We yeah. We had a decent exit last year, but aprivate CTY firm bought. You know fifty six percent of Seros for a hundredmillion, which sounds like a lot. You know valuing the wholl business o ahundred and sixty but camve, which was the beater sat, which is where we couldhave gone. I think last year raised at a six billion evaluations to Sayo. Nevertheless. Nevertheless,the hundred million dollars is nothing to sneeze that no, it's all right. It'sall right, Fu funds, the private jets right, yeah. There you go, you can haveto take it off the balance, shoet of Solsand, exactly exact u'mlike me, I'm rating thecorporate checking kind every day of Refein Clok just kidding. Let's hear about the the the RasonDatra, the reason why sales impact academy exist tell us a little bitabout the founding story and about sort of yeah the passion behind it, yeahsure. Well, after SOS, I kind of came back to the UK joined a company calledUni days, and I think that's probably where I learned the most, because wescaled really fas. We went from like two to forty million in revenue in likethree years and I built a hundred person commercial team in like fourcountries, and it was really tough. It...

...was really tough work. I was workingfor a really pretty Awful Co. They wa Nicto and but look look like look. Thefundamental issue is like I was learning through mine Tahohese entireeight years across Sarasan new days. I was learning on the job, how to be arevenue leader. You know there was no. There was no real playbrk. There was nobook book. There was just this random Schmagas Borg of information, kind ofscattered around the internet and ND and various kind of books and you'vegot this forendous, like pressure to learn on the job whilt delivering thesekind of unnatural. You know two hundred three hundred percent like like annualrednue grace, and it's really it's really. It's pretty frety irendous,because you know you feel deeply responsible to deliver and it's is andis quite a sort of fright, O funning experience. If you haven't done itbefore I mean now, I feel kind of Aright D. I could. I could take that.Take that own as a revenue leader again, I'm now in a CO position, so I wouldn'tbe quite so directly and directly involved, but it was really reallyreally hard and I'd say that tonight you know, I know that you know E. Ibrought this up at the Ako. I don't think I really enjoyed much of my timeand revenue leadership as a result, and really it kind of boils down to thefact that you know because of this, like tramatic lack of kind of educationin our profession. It means we're all totally learning on the job and, if youthink about it like like every SDR, every ae, every revenue leader everyeveryone in holeork is learning on the job and that's a pretty shocking stateof affairs, particularly when you think about y. You look at major professionslike like law, or you know, accountancy finance, or you go into things likelike the medical profession, tens and...

...tens of billions. Hundreds in fact havebeen invested over decades and decades and decades into these professionsright from when you're, maybe about fifteen. Sixteen years old rightthrough to you know continuous professional development. Actuallyinwork right. You know if you're in finance, you have to do forty hours oflearning a year and take exams and pass them by the way, or you simply can'tpractice anymore right, so which sort of rubs soul into the wounds for us inthe sells. Befor profession, because we literally got nothing right, we're allthrown into the deep end and it's like just working out, and that is anabsolute like crying shame, because we are pretty mission critical right, youknow. If we get a right, companies can be valued into the billions. You know.If we get it wrong, that's IT companies go buse, you know everyone's like gottago home and that's I mean I've. been there, it's horrendous! That's it! Jobshave gone capitals gone the innovation which could be quite important to theworld gone or the invention, or the innovation. The or the invention gotlike Gotn, like all Thas Gone Gone Gone and as you nowice that I'm the stat'spretty horrific. It's like ninety percent of startups Fal and seventypercent of series AD series s companies also fail and that's just a cryingshame and- and it all comes back to this complete and atter lack ofeducation. Okay agreed so out of that emerges this idea, for, let me teachteams that scale and provide learning solutions. However, the other thingthat you've commented on is that- and that's that's from from that idea fromthat problem, that is where sales a impact academy was born yeah, but alsoit's not just that there's a lack of education. It's that the currentsolutions for learning. Our flaw tell us about what you mean there about whatyou've learned about, how people process information absorb informationyeah, how to make it useful yeah. So here's the thing- and a lot of this isjust on. You know my own experience,...

...but I know that we've, a we've all gonethrough this you've got like that. So you got the Internet right, so you gotthe this kind of paradox of infinite access to information, but it soundsgreat, but actually it's completely floowed, because it's so much of it andit's just scattered everywhere. There's no structure, there's no way of likelike understanding or assessing quality, and so what have we all done like likejust just think about the inefficiency? How much copy have we all read butwe're like H, Sha. I just read that Blok Post is taking ten minutes andactually it's Shit, Oh God, that's kind of a waste of time. Well, how manyevents have we gone to you know Sasta or this or that R, the other which whatwould tryne to fundamentally do is learn, but this is a deeply inefficientway of doing it. Books like how much do you really like finish a book? Okay?Well, here's a question for you! Sam! Could you honestly say I read that bookand literally implemented seventy percent of it and it transformed mylife, absolutely not. In fact I requorte I need to I've figured out,because I read a lot of history books that I need to read three to fourbiographies about a specific person before I remember anything about themat all. Right, pright, same thing with weaponors: How much do you take from aWebenar all right and then translate, and so the ways that we learn are justdeeply inefficient and because it's not structured that adds another layer ofcomplexity. So, like Iu said going back to the like, oh we've got to learn onthe job and we've got ta deliver this as we learn on the job, even that bitof what we do as revenue leaders or sales reps or SDRs or CS Manit CC,Sanrat, even that's inefficient, because it's just really hard to do so.We're really up against it and- and so we've been thinking very, very deeplyabout the actual kind of learning experience and there is AI. I actuallyad. You know just just one one more little anecdate on on on Burks, youknow I read: Play Bigger Brilliant Bok...

...on cashebe design, yeah bi, relomtyright. I run a project at Uny days to deconstruct their book and creat acreate a project plan to try and do a cascrew design project, because Icontactwith the guys and they're like yeah. It's going to cost yo two hundreda fifty Ozan. U Ats Do, I was GOINGTA, say and five percent of your company.Yes, they ma that's the yes. They did I'm like. I don't. I I see I as gonnabuy that Hey Josh Ou got this great ide, so we had to do ourselves right. I gotan external consultant WHO's, an ex lawyer to deconstruct the book. Youmade a hundred slide deck and then create a project plan off the back ofit and we're still second guessing what they meant in Ha Book. So I genuinelytried to create a like practical project plan out of a book and it ishard right, and so the distance between a book and practical implementation isso far on living. People realize how F how far it is. So I don't think booksare actually a great way of transferring like acknowledge in aneffective way that you can actually start to them practically like put intoaction. So thinking about all of that, you knowwe and also one one of the other thing that like drives me mad. Is this thisthis idea that learning for like half a day on Zoom Boratsh, even in aclassroom, environment or a full day? It's bizarre and absurd? That's not howhuman beings learned yet so many people out there think. That's e an acceptableway of again imparting knowledge. You know if you're, if you're a stressedsales rab siting in a room with some Dick head in a cheap suit, talking toyou about how to do sales, having not done it for fifteen years, becausethat's basically all the old fashioned sells training. It is just such a poorway of at it like learning, not least because you're like worried about howfil yo're slipping behind you just can't take in information for eighthours with a few breaks you? U, the...

...human brain doesn't work like that. So the way that we're delivering you knowthe teaching is that we just do two hours a week. That's it! We actuallystarted three thinking that was about right, but actually is two. So we didtwo hours of learning per week, we've got a guy called Martin Hall, his theXvice Chanceler of cakedown university on board. As our learning adviser, theROL KINDOF online larning Guru Yeah. We don't like go for more than ten minuteswithout an interactive break that we have supporting like implementationguides and materials as well. The classes are dynamic. There's always twocoaches, so you get two voices. The highly interactive, so you've got a lotgoing on. You've got multiple choice. Quizzes you got word clouds thate beencrazyd, as a very very you know, dynamic learning, experience for anhour and fun right entertaining, like I remember Martin, said to me the bestprofessors ane not aren't the ones with the greatest knowledge that the ones aare great performers right. So the enterstainment Pieceis is important too,but here's the thing it's two hours a week, I'm not interrupting the salesmotion, I'm not taking reps off the front line and not even taking cros offthe front line to improve that their learning it's a couple of hours, buthere's the important thing you can literally Stillliv in a class at twoo'clock, learn for an hour and by THR thirty you're. Writing a betterprospecting. Email yeading about discovery, call you're betty doing abetter negotiation whatever it is, you've just learnet. You know you'reexecuting better on linked in immediately and that's basically calledexperiential learning. So I've got as close as I can from learning toimplementation like in the game. As humanly possible- and I think that'salso where- where we're Goingnot we're going to win the game, because thisthis learning is so practical and then and then it's so easy to immediatelyimplement, I love that that makes so much sense. I have a question, so youwere just running before you. You I...

...mean you've been O, see Oll MultipleTimes. It sounds like right, more at least a cofounder, but then mostrecently, at Uni days you were you know you were the person leading the revenue,the revenue machine and there's a there's. This idea out there that ifyou start your own business, you know Yo, you can unlock complete freedom foryour life. You have you take issue with that. Is that right, yeah? It's quite funny. I mean, I thinkthat you know one of one of the sort of I guess Pr, Prep questions that youpose. Is You know what is what this this notion about? Startup Life? Thatis utterly wrong, and you know when I hear people say: Oh Yeah, you know I'mgoing to start Mowin companies O I get like titl freedom. I sort of just laughbecause like and you know t it's like Sam, like Onte, you take on theresponsibility. I think that you know- and I I can talk from the perspectiveof cofounder- of a CEO and a revenue leader, eve sort of main iguess hatshave worn when you take on that responsibility and boy. Is itresponsibility and in Fact Sam? I actually think a little bit like youneed to get a driving license to drive a car. I think you should get a licenseto be a CO, because you're inyou're, literally you ot such a deepresponsibility for basically people for their jobs, for their well being tomake a great environment that they're working in to help their own cresthemselves kind of develop and I'd, say. Eighteen. Ninety percent of t e Cos ajust total fucking dicks ight. That should not be running a company at alllike at all, but one thing is one things for sure: it's not a feeling offreedom that I get. You know. I love it, but it is absolutely al particular andfarse growth. Maybe if you've got ta a lifestyle business you know and itcan kind of take along and you know you've got, I don't know, maybe it's alittle shop, I don't know whatever, but filmes wir. The even lifestyle likeyou've got a responsibility. You have to make this sales to to get thebusiness going. That's always stressful,...

...but you're always on it's like it's.You invest so much of yourself in your own business and so this notion offeeling free, I think it's just absolutely crab and yet and yet it is there's adifference between that sense of responsibility and having to count outto you know one of the eighty to ninety percent of total fucking Dick to youwords, thereis a difference there. There was amassive difference. Yeah there is a there is an absolute mass of difference,but I guess I'm saying what I' saying is it it's not like yeah 'm, I got thewind in my hair and this is wonderful running my own company. It's justanything but Pau we're almost at the end of our time.Together. What we like Tis, that's, sat we're going to talk to you on Fridayfor Friday fundamentals and I'm sure I will be talking to you. You know for avery longtime regardless so good. This is the part where we like to payit forward. We like to hear about your influences, you mentioned you know. Forexample, you read: predictable revenue, Aaron Ross Yeah. You know somebody that might beinfluential when you think about great people that you've worked with, theycould be other CEOS, they could be investors or it could be authors ofbooks, but you know really great ideas and great people that you want to thathelpd shape. Who you are that you want to mass long to the audience? WHATCOMES TO MIND? Well, I think yeah I mean Lik back inthe day you know Maryan, Aaron and, and that book prick t Bor evenue. I thinkit probably influenced you know most revenueleaders a in the Ri in the revenue collective, and I think that you O, I struggle to thinkof a book. That's had them Hae's big, an impact as predictable revenue. Ifyou think about you know a million plus STRs in the US- and I not know theconcept of STAS as perhaps around before the book, but it was just soaccessible so at that was just Yeu. You have to hand it to them both for that.You know, like I'm, just a massive fan boy of Mar Mark Raverge what he reallydid in terms of...

...creating an an epic data, led approachto running a revenue function. There's no one t's had again, I think, H, abigger impact on running the other whole or crather than just how youbuild an str function, and you know his books. Es extoration formerly was finfon like absolutely fantastic. You know in terms of like just vcs, David Scock.I have to thank him for writing a you know, forgetting Arrand, to write bloodpost. That led me to find the book that, let me to you know, I think, building my first kind of stolrfunction and then that really was was this tart of my career. There Tomars, Ithink, we're both big fans of him he's an absolute legend, almost tingers fromredpoint benches, just an incredibly generous man with his thoughts andideas, and I've literally been you know: I've been getting Fred, Wilson's Blodpost for about ten years. Like every day, I literally write read somethingfrom Red Wilson every day, he's all doing it, for I think twenty years andyeah he recently yeah, it's amazing yeah and you know, if you think aboutit, I mean: Do you read it as well? Yeah, of course, yeah I'm a New Yorker.So my all of my Asper, I live in the West village nearwhere he you know. All of my aspirations are to be Fred Wilson andto have my wife e join Laston one day. So yes soget it. I real, basically he'skind of coached US remotely for like fifteen years like Irea and the greatthing about it is that you can read it in like probably under a minute andit's like wow, and sometimes it's so good that you like Ryam, diving intothat and understanding at bit. Berbit. You know understanding it a, but I sawhim on ECAUL. I lived in New York for a couple years and I was like titsvnfillsn, I didn't say I didn't Sayii. I see him a lot and I saw him the bestone was before covid my wife and I were on the sea train. You know so w. TheSea train is not the nicest of our subways in the New York City and he wasstanding there at the back. The car I'm...

...like that guy. You know, I don't knowif he's a billion erybody's close to it and just to see him as an averageperson riding the subway yeah that was cool. I, like is van that man sees thefuture. I think the other one is probably- and this is the unputtofleast cool one, but you know you got ta hand it to mark Benny off whot he'sdone at sales force and I think particularly the the philanthropy piece,the one one one model we've actually copied that as it sellsin back togetherme and we're launching our own foundation and we're doing two two toso we're actually doing. Two percent of our equity, two percent of our time andtwo percent profit that we're not going to make for years into the foundation,so awesome Paul if folks want to reach out to you, talk more, maybe sign up tobecome a client of sales, inpact academy. What's the best way to reachyou well just email me so paul at sales impact dot io if you're in the redlycollective, then just payng me on Payn me on slack yeah. I D O I'd love tohear from here from anyone. You know we're really on on a mission to to dothis to really help help help the industry at scale. It feels like itfeels like it's a lovely mission to be on and you're on you're on the same one,Sam, I'm on similar one, that's for sure Paul thanks! So much for being onthe show. Well Talk to you on Friday for Friday fundamentals love it thanks,Sais, great fun, great fun, Hey everybody! Sam Jacobs! This isSAM's corner. I really enjoyed that conversation with puff fifield. Themaintakeaway, I think, is to the point of why sales impact academy exists.We've got to invest in the professional development and the training of theworkforce and the realities that companies don't have the resources todevelop their own training on how to be a great salesperson or great marketingperson, or a great fines person and, frankly, that's not really their responsibility. In my opinion,their responsibility, a company, the...

...construct of a company, is a group ofpeople coming together around you know, solving a specific problem and becomingexcellent at solving specific problem. If your a huge company may be solvemore than one problem, but solving a specific problem for a specific groupof people and doing that repeatedly and profitably and training is not in termsof how to do the function. It's hard to put that onto the shoulders of the thecompany. That's trying to solve a different problem for a different groupof people, and so that's why training companies exist. Obviously, but how arewe going to really become great at all of the things that we need to doremotely, such as become great sales, people, an marketing people, and Ithink you need a couple things. One of the you know, and I don't want to pushmy company too much. I do think you need community and I do think you needtraining, and I think that you need to have training structured in such a waythat it can integrate into your workday and that you can digest the informationand that you can access the instructors and you can do it in a fun way. That'sinteresting and that's what salls impact academy is delivering. So I,like that part of the conversation and then, of course, it's always fun tohear about you- know, CEOS that have then worked for other people are notback to CEEEO. Paul's Pon is like when people work for you, it's not thecomplete freedom that you think, because you take their livelihood intheir worlds on to your shoulders as the CEO, which makes it an awesome.Responsibility Awesome not just in like the kind of Jenx word for being great,but also just unimmense and important and significant responsibility, so goodconversation with palm now before we go, we want to think our sponsor outreach.If you want to head over to outreach dot, io forlash on outrate, you canlearn how the company outrace uses the product outreage to outrage, the verbto customers and other human beings. So far limited temon beings could expandbeyond that at some point. Assuming that other creatures have money, Iwould assume, but anyway, the point is that learn how they use this amazingproduct to deliver results. Go to out reach outao forward, slash on out rageto learn more, as I mentioned at the...

...top of the show, if you're, not amember of the sales hacker community, you're missing out, and he sailsprofessional conjoinas and memberask questions get immediate answers andshure experiences with like mind, ed, be to be sill's. Professionals jump instart a discussion with more than ten thousand sales professionals at saleshackrcom. I also should it I am Remisse if I didn't mention, if you want to getsales impact Acadhim, if you want to get training, that's included in yourrevenent colective membership. So if you're, not yet a revenent, collectivemember or if your company hasn't purchased a corporate membership to Arrevenent collective for teams product think about it, good reven Collectivcomto learn more. If you haven't given us five stars on Itunes and spotify,please do that. We want to help this get in front of more ears and more eyes,but mostly more ears. So thank you for listening to that. Give us that fivestar review. If you want to get in touch with E, you can linkoncom forch.Last the word in Forh last AMF JACOBS, again sign up for sales, hactorcommunity sales saccecom. I will talk to you next time.

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