The Sales Hacker Podcast
The Sales Hacker Podcast

Episode · 2 years ago

Friday Fundamentals: EP 33: Why Direct Mail Improves Conversion Rates Through Your Sales Cycle (Part 2)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Part 2 of our series coming in hot!

Hey folks, happy Friday. If my calendar is right and my math is correct, today's Friday July nineteen, which is a very, very important day in the history of mankind. Why? Because it's my birthday. So if you're listening to this right now and you want to send me a happy birthday note on Linkedin, I'd appreciate it, to be honest with you, because not that many people like me anymore and your friendship, even if you're a stranger, really nourishes and feeds my very insecure and lonely soul. No, it is my birthday and I don't know, I guess that's special, but that's not the point. That's not the point. The point is that we've got the second part of our interview with Chris Rudy grap which includes q Anda from the audience, and we actually try to name the folks that are asking the questions and give them a little bit of exposure on the pod. So if you're thinking about this format, we'll figure out if it works or not on an extended and sort of scalable basis. But if you're out there on a city and we have a revenue collective chapter and you want to host a fireside chat, maybe with the CEO or some important person in your metropolitan area, and you want to be on the show or host it, let me know. Let me know. On linkedincom forward, slash the word in forward, Sam F Jacobs. But today we've got Chris Rude grap and he's talking about the origin of founding the company SENDOSO. He's the CEO. He used to be an account executive at talk desk and he talks about, as we've heard on the two use a show, about the importance of direct sending. What are the objects? We are the creative objects that you can use within the context of a sequence to drive conversion and engagement and how to think about using direct mail and physical objects in the course of a surprise and delight framework that generates better when rates, more closes and more business for you. So that's what we're about to listen to today. Happy Friday. If you want to reach out to me again, it's and linkedincom forward, slash the word in forward. Last Sam F Jacobs. And finally, we want to thank our sponsor for Friday fundamentals and for our Friday episodes, which is outreach, the leading sales engagement platform. So thanks for listening and let's listen to part two of our live podcast recording with Chris Rudy Grab, the cofounder and CEO of Sindoso. So welcome back to the show everybody. It's for a happy Friday. It's not really Friday, but we're playing this on Friday. We've got Chris Rudy grab back to answer some questions from the audience from our fireside chat here in New York City and we've got a revenue collective member, Karen Putanny Hayston, who's going to ask a question. Karen, welcome to the show and what's your questions? Yeah, so one of the things that's really popular right now is socks. So you know, nicer dress socks, sometimes branded, sometimes just cool designed. So we have, you know, probably hundreds of thousands of socks in our warehouse from tons of different companies. Are Any of are they good quality or they yeah, I mean Shit, no,...

...they're good stuff. And there's I think, that socks or something that for whatever reason people just like lose socks and they could always use more socks and everyone wears them. So you know, socks are really popular. The edible treats, so the cupcake, the mini cupcakes, California edible or you mean regular both? Okay, got it. Do you send cannabis product? I'm not yet. Okay, yeah, that's cool. Yeah, but put me into that sea. Yes, just kidding, I run my own business. Yeah, Hey, California's exactly. And then outside of that, Yetti's are really popular. Cool. Yeah, getting mud blest like around a little tumblers. I so a ton of those in the I'm what I'm hearing is that I would expect you to say it has to be based on their business, tailor to their business. If they're real estate company, send them a mini empire state building. But what you're saying is doesn't really matter. It's just something cool, different they haven't received before. I think a general like looking across our entire portfolio customers, those are some of the popular thing that's end out. I think then you tie it to some messaging that really hits at home with that recipient or that target industry. That kind of brings it full circle. In addition of that, though, we do see a ton of companies will create relevant like the sending options for their where their target audiences or that are the Amazon immigration where you're getting hyper targeted with one single thing for that recipient. So that is really effective. But I think there's a place for kind of more general, broad things that eat, that kind of meet everyone's interest, and then very specific things that you'd send on a per campaign or a person basis, and having a breadth of them is helpful. Cool. Any other questions from the audience? Yeah, announce yourself. Okay, Amy Holtzman A, speaking of marketing at Alphae sence for customers, but doing a lot more with you. Yeah, what is the strangest thing you've ever said? Good question. I was actually your office today too. I didn't even see what as being with us all marketing fun. I know it was meanly friend and I don't know, but anyway, funny fact. So recently someone sent, we sent custom Piniadas, which I thought were pretty cool idea, kind of timed around Sinco to Mayo, and we stuffed them all with candy and they were so that I thought that was kind of unique. Another one of our clients sends sheet cake and has their logo on it and says like installing us as a piece of cake, and we literally ship these like quarter sheet kicks, which seems crazy, but they do it all the time. I've also sent he's like customized mini lego figures to match the linkedin prospects kind of picture as much as we can. And then we have like a Lego bill older kit and that has a bunch of different pieces than you have your own personal thing. So those are some kind of random things that...

I think come to mind. Something do the Lego. So if the if these are new items, M do you? Do you need a partner to source them? Are they like in an online catalog that we can peruse? How does that work? So we really look at it as we really try to provide more of it curated service then like an online catalog where you can see like, you know, forty different types of pens and, you know, eight hundred different notebooks. Like. No one really wants to do that. So one more or less work with our customers to we provide like a creative project manager that will kind of do discovery, saying like okay, is this top of funny? Trying to set meetings? Is a welcome kid. Are you trying to do post customer engagement? So like what what's the scenario? What's the budget? What's the persona you're trying to reach and then we'll typically suggest like anywhere from like five to twenty different things and then let them kind of decide on that. So it's kind of a collaborative brainstorm that's curated versus a catalog approach, because I think there's just, you know, there's unlimited options. We yeah, you know. And so you pick it and then you put it into the sequence or the CAD and so yeah, so then you take basically pick it out and then we have hundreds of preferred merchant partners that will do the manufacturing, whether it's locally, whether it's in China, depending on like the timelines and other factors and the cost, and then we'll get it all manufactured, get it into our facilities and then, and it's real time. So I'm N S do we are? And touch point number five is send them a Lego. Yep, just do it, just do it, click side. Awesome. Yeah, that's cool. Yeah, another questions and announce yourself. How's it going? Matt D sales manager at Electric Ai. What does electric a? I do, Matt, you've got thirtyzero people listening. Yeah, yeah, power, full fledged Izz and that was in this lack so cost effect of alternative for small meeting size of business is either Hiron in house or hold the microphone seeing the traditional providers. Yeah, awesome. What's your question? Cool. So my question is, Chris. You mentioned your inspiration through sendos. Okay, from being a salesperson and wanting to do a particular thing and realizing that there's probably an easier way to do it. But now at the sea level, hundred and fifty people like and the majority of your time being spent doing a lot of other things. Yes, what do you number one is how important is it to to stay connected to that customer experience? And now that you are the CEO, what what do you do? How do you still stay connected to that customer experience to understand like what manners and what's important, as our industry changes literally every single day. Yeah, so I'm very active with our customers. You know, today I met like four or five customers. Tomorrow I'm meeting a few. You know a couple weeks ago, as in Seattles, probably once or twice a month I'm in the field talking to customers or I also like to tag along talk to prospects, to who aren't customers yet kind to figure out that mentality as well. So I'm still very much connected there. I work with our product team directly to so I can really influence our product road map...

...based on what I'm seeing from the customers. So yeah, I think that good CEO's should really be in the field talking to customers as much as they can, especially if they're trying to influence product road map, you know, hiring who needs to do what, understanding pain points where we should be hiring more based on, you know, whether it's feature requests or whether it's other types of areas. So yeah, to answer your question, I would make it a point to till, you know, leave my office at least twice a month to good to get on a plane go somewhere else. Jason Lamp can think better recommendation. What are you most excited about on your product road map? What are the cool new things that are going to be happening? Yeah, so I'm really excited rolling out this data product for like an address verification and dad offering. So I think that mailing addresses are getting ever increasingly difficult when you're trying to target contact, not just HQ's. So we're doing some interesting stuff there with triangulating and figuring out based on data, as well as, you know, a call center solution that's going to be human verifying this. We're rolling out the this hobby, an interest stool that helps us to identify what the recipients interests are and also helps our customers keep track of those kind of gifting references so they can we can provide better recommendations on things they should send in the future, like scraping their linked in profile or, yeah, other social tweets, you know, and then taking it further of like listening into calls or emails or other data points that we can see kind of gifting keyword preferences. That's really exciting. A scheduling feature, it's just around the corner. Mobile APP. Yeah, we've got a long list of features and that, but those are kind of the top ones that come to mind. Great questions. Announce yourself, sir, Aaron Smith. I lead sales partnerships at content IQ. Were a digital publisher about ten different webs to reach about forty millionique visitors a month. I'm interesting one. What do you want your rets talking about on Linkedin? Do you want them talking about some Doso? Do you want talking about the industry of sales. Do you want them talking about the industry of their target accounts? What would be ideal for you? That is you a fantastic question. Yeah, I have to think about that for a second and the context is take done laps out there are good friends saying stop talking about yourself and start making yourself an expert in your buyers industry. Yeah, what do you think? So I think that, I mean one is building their own brand. I think there's some value in terms of getting in front of the camera or posting things, questions, kind of seeing how they can develop an audience. So I think outside of just and Dosa themselves and their career, you know, how can they, you know, showcase themselves in a professional manner that can build themselves? I do...

...think talking about send Doso is helpful because I think that they're they have audiences that they can connect with. The end of the day, they're a salesperson. So if they're posting, you know, a link to me to set a conference or a cool podcast were on, then I think that inevitably, you know, drives their business forward, which is, you know, helping them build revenue. I think it's also about interacting. So who are they following? Who are who are those contacts? They're going out and commenting on posts. So maybe not not as much as like just going in there and posting something, but going in there and finding people in the industry and providing, you know, relevant you know, commentary to what other people are saying. I think that's a good way to kind of engage on Linkedin. You are salesperson. I imagine you were a great salesperson. Yeah, I would say what do you think makes a great salesperson? And when you're looking at similar errands, question, which is you've got a group of people that you can't influence directly all the time, right, they've got managers and managers of managers. Yep, and they're they're representing you. And when do you love it? When is it that they are the best of Sindoso? And then do you cringe? And what do you think makes a great sales person? Yeah, so I think I'd say couple things. One, I think I'm probably just describing myself and then we'll just where sweatshirt. Yeah, I think being very good at the at your text act. So like I was practically our salesports Admin. I could like run all these reports that you know. Some the other sales persons are like, oh, how do I do this? So I think, you know, there's there's a lot of modern tools that sales people can use and being an expert in all those, including sales force, where I think some people fall short of liked create really customized reports. Or how do you take in, you know, Marquetto insights and use that, mix that data with other reports to see which, you know, contacts you should be going after this and that. So I think being a good operator of tools, I think, you know, being a kind of building your own personal ram, so that's going to conference, is going to meet up, talking to people. I think I was a big fan of that. I mean being in San Francisco, it's a little easier maybe than some markets, but sanpances going the same. You could do a lot of meetups and meet people that way. I was, or I think are, thinking about our best sales people being very fluent in their conversation, thinking that they can you know, I think there's some sales reps that are, you know, they could sell you anything, but then there's some sales areup sort of very consultatum, and so I think a mix of both is kind of the key things. I've seen all sides of the spectrum, but I think if you are you think to consultative might be an issue. I think to consultative is an issue because you can maybe be boring versus the other side of the spectrum. If you're just like you know, you can talk, talk, talk, talk, sell anyone anything, you might miss some valuable discovery that really is painting the picture of what that pain point you're trying to solve for. So somewhere in the middle is going to be key. I think hard work, you know, just nothing like getting in early to the office and working your butt off. So, you know, I was a very...

...get in the office. Said you know before. Most people would what's what's a good time to get in there? You know, I like to get into the office like thirty, because you'd get like an hour or so before that kind of got noisy and then you can, you know, duck out a little early to get some golf into. So that wasn't always bad. It's tougher in the San Francisco because your seven, seven thirty is are thirty. Yeah, business is already happening on these codes. There change your point. Yeah, any other questions, feel free. I am Alex Bark from the head of sales. Were coming called the droit trading technologies, where a front to back water execution managin system of that feels the nuances of the counter exotic nations. For this great quick question. Few restress in terms of you know, if I think of the top of the funnel, do you find that a lot of companies are sending out thought leadership along with their and want to call nick next, because there's a lot of thought that goes into these gifts. But it's thought leadership, Info, graphics books. Is that something you're sending a lot, or is it more should out of sonic call cakes? I would say both actually work really well. I would say swag, though, is less top of funnel. Like you, you want to build a bit of rapport with the prospect before you send them like a jacket with your logo on it, and less you're like, I don't know, like the Google's of the world, who's just like you, just of their brand or or one of those you know fortune, you know fifty. So I would say that the thought leadership dough is really useful. I think that also that that thought leadership. They'll also does really well with kind of what I call deal acceleration, which is you've done the demo, you've got this weird period of like call it, you know, one month to six months before they're signing the contract, depending on what business you're in, and typically you're just like, you know, falling up on email candences or, you know, calendar invites that are sitting out there, and so I think that's the best place to sprinkling some of that thought leadership where you're getting on their desk and that can help influence, you know, the buying committee and things like that. Makes a lot of sense. Thank you. Yeah, and so to Alex's question, the first touch point should not be direct mail, in your opinion, know how disagreem. I think it can be definitely okay and we see a lot of our customers that will have it. I think the biggest thing that you should focus on is the like sequence of events. So if you're going to do it first, then you just need to make sure that you're falling up with that and you're bringing that back in so it's hey, did you get the cool, you know, Standford Coffee Mug? I sent you that was blah, blah, blah, or hey, do you know? Do you want the code to that lock box? You know, so you're like tying it in to your messaging. I think that maybe where it falls short is we're a marketing will just do a blast of direct mail with out kind of sales alignment, and then there's kind of like spray and praying direct mail will get responses, which I think is less useful. So I think we do have a good amount of our customers that will start off with a direct mail and follow up that. We also have some that use at the very end who might be a bit more, you know, cost conscious and going to do some free emails first and then drop it in. But it all depends. I mean if you look at opportunity costs and you...

...have some customers, you know Gong as one of them in particular, that did some analysis and it's like they've shortened their sequences down because of putting it at the top of the sequence and that made a big difference than waiting till ten, fifteen step to do the direct mail because you want to, you know, save some money. Yeah, is there a worst practice? Is there? You know, if there are companies that are not using sendos or the right way or their common themes. They're I think the spraying and praying where you don't have a get follow up. It's one just get something on their desk and then no one follows up is a terrible practice. I think you know shitty call our port caller. I'm sorry. Yeah, of course I would sting so much more to it. Yeah, I think shitty quality is like, you know, or things that aren't useful. I think you really got to think of quality over quantity and I think some people just say, Hey, I need to do some quick directmail and we do this and that and then it, you know, doesn't come together right because it's a lot of effort trying to do it yourself and then just kind of flops. You know, there's bad data to what's worse than sending it to a you know, sending it to the wrong place, the wrong HQ, sending it's someone that left three months ago. You know, you can look ad by doing things like that. So, yeah, one last question. Yeah, Hi, I'm Laur COOLOM, senior director of marketing at NASTAC and the cooler services side. So my questions on the on boarding and retention side. So, as we're looking to create a new program for when it one of our business lines, what do you recommend for the cadence of sending gifts? Is it like within two weeks, than three months, then six months or a year, like is there certain number of times you should be welcoming your new clients to the business? Great questions. So I would kind of think of it more of like either product milestones, back milestones, milestones that you can look at data to say, like if you add ten users, then those that kind of cohort is ex likely more to renew or to stay on for x went years. So looking at kind of data points that it would be like success measures. I think those would be a better answer, because I think each different business is has slightly different needs in terms of how fast they the on boarding. I think there's a definite needs like a welcome and then like a completion of on boarding, like a graduation kind of when that's applicable, like when there's an implementation and on boarding situation, I think that's a nice handoff. And then I think it's useful to have these like lifestyle of vents kind of cute up whether it's like a baby one Z that's branded or a dogg eat shoe toy or baby one Z at their one year anniversary with your business or when they are baby, more like for when they have a baby, and you can just have that on deck so that you look like a hero sending him some funny on Z. that's I mean, maybe it's...

...not even something that's branded, or maybe it's just small branded but has something like relevant to you, know, your your brand. That's more funny, and so I think those type of things really resonate with customers where you hit him at times where they're already kind of having happy moments and thinking through what all those could be those five to ten and then just arming the warehouse with that so that you can click and send in real time and they get it like the next day right. Thank you, Chris. Thanks so much for being here. If people want to reach out to you, either in the audience or online, it's Chris at sendsocom Yep. So we want to thank sendos. So we want to thank outreach, who is one of our sponsors, and of course we also want to thank Russell Tobin. So, Russell Toben, if you're out there listening or you're in this room. They're one of the great search firms here in New York and all over the country world, and they are also hosting us in this incredible events based in their very generous partner. So thanks to Russell Tobin, thanks to Sendoso, thanks to outreach and thanks to all of you for coming. If you want to reach out to me, I'm and Linkedin. So linkedincom forward. Splash the word in forward, M F Jacobs, and we'll talk to you next time. Perfect. Thank you, thank.

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