The Sales Hacker Podcast
The Sales Hacker Podcast

Episode · 3 years ago

Friday Fundamentals: EP 37: How to Set Up Your Remote Sales Team for Success

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In a world where sales teams are remote, how can you set your team up for success? Tune in today as we chat through actionable strategies to get YOUR team functioning as one in a remote setting.

Hey everybody, it's Sam Jacobs. Welcome to the salesacker podcast and to Friday fundamentals. We have an exciting couple of weeks for you. What we're going to do is something a little bit different. The episodes over the next three weeks on the main show are all these live recordings that we did when we were on a boat in the middle of the Hudson River. But for Friday fundamentals over the next three weeks, what we're going to be doing is bringing on my friend and Revenue Collective member, Colin Cadmus, who, if you are on Linkedin at all, Colin is one of those people that has something really insightful and interesting to say pretty much every day and he always gets like a thousand likes, which is irritating to the rest of us who are all trying to build up our following. But, but, but, in all seriousness, Colin has insights that he's dropping on linkedin every single day. So I thought it would be amazing to get Colin as as a threeweek guest on Friday fundamentals because he has so much, so many insights about how to grow and structure a sales seem how to motivate a sales team. So we're excited to have you. So call and welcome to the show. Thanks him. I'm excited to be here. Thanks for ever excited. Yeah, we're going to have you over over a three week period, so people are going to get to know you. So before we dive in, we want to thank our sponsor for Friday, fundamentals, which is our corporate overlord outreach. Outreach triples the productivity of sales teams and empowers them to drive predictable and measurable revenue growth by prioritizing the right activities in scaling. Customer engagement with intelligent automation. Outreach makes cust from are facing teams more effective and improves his ability into what really drives results. And you're going to be hearing this over the course of August. outreaches doing their unleash summit series all over the country. There they I think yesterday, which is when we're recording this, which is August. Second I think they were in San Francisco. They're going to be in Atlanta, they're going to be in New York, they're going to be all over, so pay attention to that. But for Today we've got Colin Cadmis, the VP of sales from air call, and a Callin for this first Friday fundamentals, where you're our guest. We want it. We want to know your baseball card. So first can you just tell us a little bit about a yourself, your titles, vp of sales, give us a little bit...

...of a bio on Colin Cadmus? Yeah, sure, so VP sales of at air call for the last ten months. Prior to this, I was VP sales at drcom, and prior to that is where I really got into sales. I had coming out of college, spent my first four years in retail management. I graduated in two thousand and eight, which was the peak of the recession. If you were trying to hit the job market then, wasn't easy and we didn't have many options. Most of my friends were back in their parents basements, you know, just looking for any way to scrap together some money, and I was fortunate enough to have an internship turned into a job offer to be a store manager at CBS pharmacy. So I started my career there. Did that for four years. Learned a lot, but the biggest thing that I learned is that I didn't want to do that forever. And that's that's what. If you've ever worked in retail you know where I'm coming from. It's nights, weekends, it's the pay is really low. There's there's not a whole lot to really enjoy in the job, and so I eventually decided to grab a u haul and pack up my whole apartment from Rhode Island. I was twenty six years old. I moved back to mom and dad's house and kind of knocked on the door and said, Hey, I'm unemployed, I just bailed out on my my lease, I have no money and I need a place to stay. And so I spent the next six months soul searching figuring out what I wanted to do. Sales heads always been kind of a natural thing for me, but sales means a lot of different things. Right. What are you going to sell? And I had no idea. So went to work one day with my brother in law, who was the director of sales at college humor, and it was the first time that I walked into sort of a startup casual office. I had never had no clue that this even existed and I walk in see all these people in casual clothes at their stand up desks, you know, talking on the phone, giving each other high five stars, Ping Pong tables and like kegs of beer and all this stuff, and I can't believe that this is a place of work and these people are earning money and having fun and I...

...knew right away I need to do something just like this. Of course. I asked my brother in law for a job and he said no way, you need you need experience. So I said what kind of experience do I need? He said go get a job called calling at a smaller company and go from there. So I hit linkedin and and started searching and came across a company called single platform. Met the VP of sales, Adam Leebman, who I know. You know well, a founding member of revenue collective, and Adam and I hit it off right away. I knew I love this guy's energy. I would love to work for him. I don't even think he actually wanted to hire me, because he was hiring people straight out of college and I always sort of this outlier who had four years of weird, irrelevant experience. But we hit it off and I got the job and I came in and just was laser focused and I said I'm I am going to be the best person at this at the in the sales organization, and I'm going to take full advantage the opportunity that's here, because single platform had just gotten acquired for a hundred million dollars literally the month before I started. So I knew there would be huge growth opportunity and I knew this was my chance. If I was ever going to be able to make it in sales, this was it, and so I just stayed laser focused every day. I absorbed everything that I possibly could from the people around me. There were about about thirty salespeople at the time here in New York and you know, I just soaked it all in. I worked long hours and I just stayed laser focused every day. I didn't get distracted by the social scene in the office. I wasn't. I was there for one reason and it was to become successful in sales. And so I cranked away for ten months straight as a top sales person and then finally got the opportunity from Adam to take over the sales training aspect of the organization, which to me, was that was that the sort of the catapult into sales leadership. We were hiring ten to fifteen, sometimes twenty, people a month. I know you know the single platform story really well, and so to be able to take that over and be...

...in charge of hiring those people and training them through their first three months of the organization, that was huge for me and I realized right away training and leading sales people for me was even more fun than just being a salesperson. I knew that's what I wanted to keep doing. I knew I wanted to to you know, I aspired to be like Adam. I wanted to be a VP of sales and eventually found the opportunity to go to drcom and then from there to to air call, and so that's a that's how I got where I'm at. I love it and and I you know, we're going to have you on the on the full show sometime because I want to dive into your background. But just to be clear, I don't think retail experiences are relevant. It sounds like you've learned. You know you you've earned every single thing you've ever got and and that's that's the American dream and it's also just damn impressive. So we're excited to have you on this show. Let's give you just a quick opportunity to plug are call. What is are call? Why should we buy our call? Tell us more sure. So Air Call is a cloud based phone system for businesses and our differentiator. What we are doing here is we want to be the phone system for every single team in the company. There's a lot of phone systems that are built specifically for certain teams. So you have phone systems for sales teams, you have phone systems that connect specifically to Zend desk for your support team. Our goal here is to provide one phone system that plugs into all of those tools so that everything's tied together there. You're able to transfer calls within departments. You're able to let's say you have a salesperson who moves over into a support or a CS roll. They don't need to then get set up on a whole new system with a new phone number. So that's that's our big differentiator. And then, of course, there's the basics of cloud phone system, which is the flexibility of being able to set up a call center or set up agents with numbers remotely in any country with phone numbers calling from anywhere, all that good stuff and and yeah, it's been a fun ride so far. It's a huge demand for what we're doing and we're we're killing it, so it's been fun. Yeah, I think give us a just I mean, you...

...really are killing it. It's a French company. All for folks that are out there. They have sponsored the sales sacer podcast. But, by the way, that's not why Colin gets to be on the show. Call gets to be on the show because he puts out amazing content. But give us a little bit whatever private information that you're comfortable sharing, just about the momentum, because it really is pretty, pretty wild. You and jeff fakers, another of neglected members, VP of marketing, are just doing some great work over there, are you guys? Past thirty million an rr. We're in that ballpark. We're in that ballpark. So we're founded in two thousand and fourteen. Phrased about forty million, a little over forty million to date. Series. Be probably looking to do a series ce I would say, towards the end of the year, and then our goal is IPO, our CEO, our founder. We are laser focused on on an IPO and getting there. You mentioned Jeff Freakers. So I have to throw this in there. A large part of the reason I came to work at Air Call is meeting Jeff and seeing the marketing engine that he has created here. Seventy percent, I give you a little inside Info here, seventy percent of our deals come in bound. They come to us, and for a sales leader that's a dream come true, right, to be able to scale at the rate that we're scaling and have seventy percent of our business coming to US asking for help for things that we can help them with. That's pretty exciting. So we get to spend the majority of our time in the sales org talking to people who wants to talk to us, which is the hardest part of the game, right, and so part of what I'm doing is is trying to reduce that number, not by reducing our inbounds but also conquering outbound and building out that channel so we can also help the people who don't know to come to us, who are marketing efforts maybe aren't reaching, and that's how we're going to take it to to the next level. That's fantastic. That is absolutely awesome. Last question before we get into the official question for today's episode. But you're putting out some amazing content out there. What's your strategy? Do you haven't do have have you built you know? Are you one of those people like well, every morning, from thirty am to thirty am, I think and I meditate and then from thirty am to zero thirty am, I I draft my insightful Linkedin Post. How are you creating such amazing content and...

...getting such great and great engagement? Where these ideas coming from? Good, good question. I do not meditate. I've I've tried. I kind of know. You know, Ka, Kudos to those who can. I've tried so many times. I can't figure out how to shut my brain off like that. I really wish I could. I've tried the head space APP. I've tried all of those things and my brain just keeps going. So I need some help there. I probably could could benefit from that, but but no, I don't do that. I'm not one of those, you know, wake up early and run five miles, hit the Jim super hard kind of people. You know, I wish I was, but I'm not. So for me with the content with Linkedin, actually, just about ten months ago, almost about when I started here, actually was around January, I met with someone who does consulting for sales teams and teaches them how to leverage social and, you know, I was meeting with a lot of consultants and just getting ideas. I was still knew at air call and trying to see if there's other people that could be helpful to me, that I could learn from. And I had a conversation with him and I was I'm a always a big, you know, Naysay. I'm like this seems like Bs. I don't know, people posting a bunch of stuff. It does it? What does it do for the business? Seems like a big waste of time. Seems like it's very almost narcissistic. That was my view, is like, this is all about that person, it's not about anyone else. And he challenged me. He said he's at first of all, you're completely wrong. And any challenged me back and he said sharing content is not about yourself, it's about the people who need to see it and who will benefit from it. And you know that people need to see or need to hear what you have to say simply because of the job that you're in and the things that you do and the fact that you've been relatively successful at it. So imagine if you could amplify that across the eighteen million sales and support and success people, you know, customer facing people, that are on Linkedin. Would that make you feel good? And he got me thinking. I said, well, yeah, I guess so, right, but but I still don't...

...think anyone wants to hear from me. Right, who am I? I haven't I poed some big company. I don't have some crazy story behind me. And he said, I challenge you to do it for thirty days, post once a day during the week for thirty days and I guarantee you you'll get traction and I guarantee people will want to hear what you have to say. And I took the challenge and I went for it and I downloaded, you know, the the buffer APP where you can schedule out some posts, so that I could manage my time and not have to, you know, pour boatloads of hours into it each day. And in terms of coming up with the content, for me, that's the really, really easy part. I love sales. It's on my mind every second of every day and there's always something new happening when I walk into the office. And usually what inspires the post is probably something that happened within the last few days or the last week right here that I'm able to take that lesson and try to communicate it and see what people think about it. On the other side, some of it is things that I'm kind of playing around with in my head that I'm just curious to see. Do People agree or is there another side of this that that I'm not considering? And so for me that's very beneficial because instead of just assuming that I always know everything, I can throw a thought out there and get a lot of feedback on it really quickly, and many of the people who comment have have changed my mind on things, are opened my eyes to seeing things different. So this is an infinite amount of benefits from it and that's kind of what's driven me to keep it going. Well, it's it's awesome and I had the same conversation with two people, maybe these are the same two people. One was Max all trueler and the other was jake down lap and both of them said, you know, it's not about you, it's about sharing and if and if a couple people get something good from what you're sharing, then then maybe it's a good thing and that really flipped my whole mindset around linkedin and I was a little bit of a hater and now I kind of think it's the best social network there is because it's only focused on positivity. It's it is, you know, there's great self help stuff and there's bad selfhelp stuff, but it's not the same thing as twitter, where people are just shitting on each other the whole time and everybody's a some kind of on a spectrum of evil. From the other person's perspective.

Linkedin seems like a more positive place. Yeah, it really is, and it's focused on, you know, things that actually matter. You Scroll through like your facebook or your Instagram, and I'm on there too a little bit. But like it's nonsense, right, you don't. You don't come off a half hour of scrolling through one of those platforms and come away with a better person or a smarter person or with a new viewpoint on something. But I don't think there's a minute I spend on linkedin where it's not opening my mind or teaching me something, and that's pretty cool. Yeah, yeah, I come across, I come away from instagram feeling envious. That's the main, main feeling. I get so and Linkedin. I'm always learning something. All right. So first of all, column thanks for that that long that long prolog. Sure we're here on Friday fundamentals. Thanks for those of us that have made this journey into the fifteen minute so far. But we've actually got some great content Linkedin, worthy content from Collins. So the first question for this week that we're going to ask you is what do you think about remote sales, rolls, remote work in general? Give us your thoughts on both what you think about it and how to make the most of it. Potentially cool, great questions. So I'll talk specifically to remote sales. I think it definitely differs for different departments, whether it's engineers or recruiting or something of that sort, but for remote sales are, I'll say, even for the customer side right Anythn customer facing, whether it's see as on boarding support, if you're doing phone support or or remote sales development or a he's or what have you. Remote can work, but I see most of the companies that I see doing it are not executing it well, and so I have some strong thoughts on it. I think first of all, if you're you're an early stage company, and by early stage I mean you're not enorm as, you're not a giant. Yet you need to pick one or the other, and I say this based on experience that I've had at my last company, where I tried to do both. And what you need to realize is that remote sales is it's a unique beast in and of itself. It requires a different type of salesperson who's going to be selfmotivated, who doesn't need...

...the energy of the office around them, who doesn't need quick access to answers to questions or live coaching, things of that nature. They need to be able to drive themselves, and the leadership that you need to be able to manage edge a team of remote people is an entirely different leadership profile than someone who manages a team in the office. The skill sets are incredibly different, and so I think the first step is you need to pick. What's your strategy? Are we building a remote team? If we are, let's build everything around that, and I can get into that, or we building a team here inhouse, and if we are, let's design our process, our training. You know, all of our tools and our culture, even around how we're going to make that work. So I think location has a lot to do with that. For us here at our call we have two offices, one in Paris one in New York City. We invested a lot in the offices. They're pretty massive. We have plenty of seats, and so when we make that investment to be in these major cities, we did it for a few reasons. Number one is the talent. Right you're paying to be where a lot of talented people are, and so you need to take advantage of that. And so for me, hiring remote workers for that simple reason alone doesn't make a whole lot of sense. We have everything that we need right here. So let's do it under one roof and we get to take advantage of all of the advantages of having people together where they can collaborate, learn from each other, etc. If you don't have that luxury and you're not in Paris or New York City or San Francisco or one of these major areas, and in order to attract the talent that you need, you need to be flexible. That's where remote can start to make sense and in that case build your whole company around it, build your whole process around it. Your leadership team around it, etc. To give you a few of the specifics of what personally drives me crazy. D I take a lot of demos, always signing up for new tools and looking for things that can help my team and so constantly taking demos of new things, specifically because I'm still in my first year here and building out our stack, and so I've sat in on a lot of these demos. And what drives me nuts is when...

...a remote ae is obviously remote, and what I mean by that is you shouldn't know that they're remote. You shouldn't be able to see that it immediately from me and it devalues what they're pitching to me. When I can see that they're in their bedroom and I see, like their laundry in the background or I see their kitchen or I hear their dog barking, that gives me this sort of subconscious feeling of I'm not dealing with a company, I'm dealing with this one person in their bedroom and makes me uncomfortable. I made a post about this recently and of course it's controversial and there's people on both ends of the spectrum, but that those are my thoughts on it. If you are going to do remote, set the reps up properly. Get them ridiculously strong Internet connections. Make sure that they're plugged into Ethernet so that when they're on zoom or when they're on air call or whatever they're using to talk to people, they have a strong connection. That's the number one thing I see people working remote. They have terrible connections and it impacts the Demo horrendously. Investing good webcams. Get them to monitors so that you know they can see their demo and see their notes, etc. Have a good desk set up for them so that you're not that's staring up their nose hairs from the angle of their laptop Webcam. Get them a good headset so you can hear them well and I think the biggest thing that makes a big difference is get them some sort of backdrop or have them positioned where there's a wall behind them so that, again, you're not looking into their house. It's incredibly distracting. It's the last thing you want someone paying attention to, but we can't help it. Our Eyes Wander and if we're looking at someone's house, we're probably not paying it as much attention to the demo. So anyhow, I'm strong opinions on that. But if you go remote, set the reps up for success in that way. I love that. And last question for today. Preference on the best headset. I like the job Ra forty. It depends on what phone system you're using. They'll usually recommend whatever's best. Job Ra forty is really good. It's affordable. It's about a hundred, twenty,...

...hundred thirty bucks. You get them on Amazon and you can plug it in either USB or you can pull it out and plug it straight into your iphone. So I love it. Awesome. Colin, thanks so much for being on Friday fundamentals. If folks want to reach you, I'm sure they can on Linkedin, but remind us how to spell your name, because that's probably the best way to find you. Sure. Yeah, Linkedin is great. My Name is Colin. Colin. Last name is cadmus s adm us. Awesome, Colin. Will Talk to you over the next two weeks. If you want to reach out to me, it's Sam Jacobs Linkedincom for the word in for Sam f Jacobs. Thanks again to our partner outreach. Thanks for listening to Friday fundamentals and we'll talk to you next time. Thanks am.

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