The Sales Hacker Podcast
The Sales Hacker Podcast

Episode · 3 years ago

Friday Fundamentals: EP 39: Why You Should Avoid Job Hopping

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Are you a job hopper? We're chatting through why it may not work in your favor to job hop! 

Hey everybody. Sam Jacobs, happy Friday. Welcome back to Friday fundamentals in the salesacker podcast, where at the end of a three week run with Colin Cadmis, the VP of sales at air call. So far, Colin has shared with us the importance of transparent leadership and how to structure and set up your remote sales team for success. Here's a hint. Don't leave the laundry in the background in a basket. Try to create some kind of pleasing, pleasing environment and make sure that you get them great headsets and good Internet so that things don't drop out. So those that that was a great those have been two great episodes. Calm, we've got you back on the show for your last Friday fundamentals, at least for a little while. And before we get there we want to thank our sponsor. Friday fundamentals is brought to you by outreach. Outreach triples a productivity of sales teams and empowers them to drive predictable and measurable revenue growth by prioritizing the right activity in scaling customer engagement with intelligent automation. Outreach makes customer facing teams more effective and improves visibility into what...

...really drives results. No callin our last question for you. There's all these SDRs out there, there's account executives, there's people that are new to their career in sales. They join a company for whatever reason. Maybe they it's not what they thought or maybe, on the other side of it, they have just had an absolutely incredible for one year run and they're getting hit up by recruiters all over the world world and they're thinking about leaving their role. But you have a you have a piece of advice and sort of a set of wisdom around why they should avoid job hopping. So, Colin, why do you think early sales professionals, and really any sales professional, should avoid job hopping? Yeah, so it's happening a lot now and and there's a lot of good reasons and I think a big part of it is it's not actually their fault. There's a lack of education around this. People don't talk about it and I think these you know, they're graduating out of school and they don't understand necessarily the impact that it can have on them long term to be hopping around so much. There's a level of impatience. I think that happens. People expect things to happen really, really, really quickly in their...

...careers these days and it usually doesn't. It usually takes a bunch of time and usually need to sit tight for a bit. And then there's also, I think, a level of expecting things to be perfect, which, especially in the start up world, you got to throw that expectation right out the window. It's probably not going to happen. And so I think the problem starts with with educating people. You know, I know from from my experience in college. We were never taught about how to vet a start up before you accept a job. No one talks about it. They teach you how to format your resume, they teach you how to answer cookie cutter interview questions that a fortune five hundred would probably ask you and they basically set you up for the old school model of find a really big company, go work there for thirty years and climb the corporate ladder and then you know, safer retirement and then retire and you're good to go. But that's not the world that we live in today. We live in a world where most people are, maybe not most, but a large majority of people are getting jobs at startups...

...that are extremely volatile, their high risk and you could end up very unhappy very quickly. And so it all starts with picking the right start up. People need to do a better job vetting out their companies, and I see it all the time when we're interviewing people coming straight out of college and then almost don't ask any questions, or the questions they do ask they don't probe in they take everything that we say and just believe it. And you really need to be cautious when when you're going to a start up, because their job is to sell you on the vision and you need to poke holes in that stuff and find out how much cash they have in the bank, find out if they don't hit their sales numbers this year, how long does the company last for? How far away could you be from actually closing the doors? Ask those tough questions, because you're putting your career in their hands. So it all starts with that. And then once you've picked the right employer, you've vetted them out and of course there's there's always risk. Right, you're not going to find one where there isn't risk. But once you've done that, you need to be prepared to be committed to them and to be...

...loyal to them, whether or not things are perfect. Of course, there's extreme measures where if things are so bad that it makes sense to leave regardless, but usually that's not the case. Right. Usually there's just a few complaints, and I'm but judging this based off of the hundreds of interviews I do, or people come to me and they're unhappy with their employer and I asked them why and they start rattling off some of relatively silly things that I think a person should be able to just deal with. And so that's where the patients comes into play. If you're looking to get somewhere in your career, you have a lot more to gain, particularly entry level sales. Right you come in as an str you come in as a maybe an early stage full cycle salesperson. Let's say you did the job for a year and you maybe got passed over for that promotion or they picked someone before you, and you take it personal and now you're just angry and you're going to leave the company and you're going to go get another job. Meanwhile, if you stuck it out for another maybe six months, twelve months, you probably be next in line for that promotion. And what I think people fail to realize,...

...and this is the big point here, and I do do a lot of talking about this internally as a way of making sure that we retain our people, because this is not bs, this is the truth. You become more valuable than you ever could be to anyone by staying in one place for a long time because you learn everything about the company. You eventually get to a point, especially in a startup, where you know more about the business, about the sales process, about the product than almost anyone else on the team. If you stay there long enough, you eventually get to that point. And I've seen people who have actually followed that path and stick it out. And these maybe people who in their first or second year, no one would have even thought of them as a future leader or in moving up into a higher level roll. But they stayed patient and and they they were there so long that eventually they became that very obvious next pick for one of those roles because everyone else had bailed out and the level of tenure that was in the...

...company, it started to get narrowed down to those few people who were really patient, and that's where the big opportunities come. So, to sum it up, don't look for, you know, taking small little baby steps to climb your career, whether it's, Oh, they offered me ten came more to go work this other company, so I'm going to leave and now I'm going to go to that company for ten ky more, but I'm going to be the brand new person who knows nothing about that company, and then maybe I'll leave for five came more, six months later, twelve months later, whereas if you stayed put and did the same job for longer than you probably wanted to, eventually of such a wealth of experience and knowledge that you can hop from what even an individual contributor role to manage or two director to ahead of something. That's how that stuff happens, by accumulating that wealth of knowledge. And so pick the right employer, vet them out, ask the tough questions and be patient, and that's how you can make big leaps in your career rather than small, little baby steps. I love it. It's great advice and I've seen it myself so many times. So you know, as...

Colin says, be very selective about that choice when you choose a company. But when you do choose the company, try to make a commitment for a long for the long term, and over time you will accumulate institutional knowledge, expertise and wisdom and that will put you in a vaunted position. So, Colin, thanks for being on Friday fundamentals over the last three weeks. We really appreciate it. Will find you on Linkedin. It's cool. I N Space C ADM US. He's VP of sales at air call. Air Call is doing great things. If you need a new phone system, consider them great cloud based phone system. If you want to reach me, I'm on Linkedin. Linkedincom for slash the word in forks, Sam f Jacobs. If you haven't rated the show, please give us five stars on itunes. If you want to reach out and and think about or join revenue collective, reach out to us on Linke. Then we can tell you more about it, and otherwise we want to thank our sponsor, outreach, and we will talk to you next time. Calm, thanks for being on the show. Thanks again for having me, Sam. Take care. Take Care,.

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