The Sales Hacker Podcast
The Sales Hacker Podcast

Episode · 5 months ago

154: Guided Selling w/ Neil Ringers

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Overview:

This week on the Sales Hacker podcast, we speak with Neil Ringers, EVP of Revenue Grid.

Neil’s experience includes a long history of sales leadership, primarily in the Salesforce ecosystem, and is now running revenue for Revenue Grid. Revenue Grid is mainly focused on automation and integration, bringing your calendar and email into your CRM. They've built a new process of guided selling, which Neil discusses during the show.

What You’ll Learn

  1. How Revenue Grid enables smarter selling
  2. Guided selling and engagement
  3. Scaling sales during the pandemic
  4. How to build a winning sales team

Show Agenda and Timestamps

  1. Show Introduction [00:00]
  2. About Revenue Grid & Neil’s Journey [06:39]
  3. Scaling Up During The Pandemic [11:40]
  4. Developing A Winning Sales Team [16:24]
  5. The Value Of CRM Integration [22:24]
  6. Who Neil Finds Inspiration From [26:44]
  7. Sam’s Corner [29:37]


 

EEVERYBODY, it's Sam Jacobs and beforejumping in to what you're about to listen to I'd, be remissed not to tellyou about unly, two thousand and twenty one on May. Eleven through thirteenthwere focusing on how to win all together in the new sales era. You'lllearn new, go to market strategies, get deeper, funnel insights and actionawletakeaways for your entire organization, from revenue, leaders at high growstartups and fortune five hundred companies and our very special guestsare none other than Guy Ras podcaster and author of how I built this andcarry laurence. The first female fiher pilot in the US Navy come save yourseat for this high energy online event at unlish, dot out reach Dadao one twoone thre three hello: Everyone at Sam Jacob's gear.Listening to the saleshacker podcast today in the show we've got neelringers, the evp of enterprise and really the person running revenue for areally interesting company. Called revenue. Gred they've been around awhile, primarily focused on automation and integration, bringing in yourcalendar bringing in your email into your crm, but they built this fhole newprocess of guided selling, which is really really interesting and you'lltalks all about it. So I love the conversation now before we get there.We want to think our sponsor today' sponsors out reach. Outridge has been along time, sponsored the podcast and they just launchd. A new way to learn.Outreach on out reaches the place to learn how outreached is out reach,learn how the team follows up with every lead and record time aftervirtual events and turns those leads into money. You can also see our ourytruns account. Bass plays, manages reps and so much more using their own salesengagement platform, everything's, backed up by data puled from out reachprocesses on the customer base, when you'R don you'll be able to do it aswell as they do had to outreach tatio forrd slash on out reach to see whatthey have going on and now, let's listen to my conversation with NEOLringers everybody at Sam Jacobs. Welcome to theSalehacker podcast today on the show we've got Neil ringers Neil is the evpof enterprise at Revenuet Grid, which...

...is a really exciting company. He's gota long history of sales leadership, primarily in the sales for CECO systemand he's here to talk to us today, D Nel, thanks for for coming to the showyes IAM. Thanks for having me we're excited to have you so I mentionedyou're the vpof enterprise at revenue grade. There are some folks that mightnot know who revenue gred is. So in your words, what is Revenue Grid Yeah?Thank you, Sam Yeah, so I do provide the leadership for revenue grid fromNorth America. Enterprise Sales- and you know, revenue gridd- is a productthat has evolved out of integration to email and counter, so essentially asidebar in your cap in your email that pulls data from the source of truth,which is email encountered and puts it into sales force and in the reason whythat's really important is because, where we start is data and data flows downstream intosales force and having that source of truth is a great tool for us. An onpulling the right kind of data and with the transparency ultimately is going tobe in sales. For So, it frankly provides me as a sales leader and acoach with the information that helps me be successful and then ultimatelytranslates down into my cales team, as as I'm coaching them and mentoring them.So when I know when emails are coming in and emails are going out and howmany Appointments Strategic Appointments That my team has had withthe right people during the week, I can focus on that and I can predict what'shappening in sales force and in my forecast. So if I see a forecast thatdoesn't have any activity for a deal, that's going to close in the nextcouple of weeks, I would put a big red flag next to that, and I would have aconversation with my rap and I would y U W talk about. Why are you notconnecting with the CEO or the CFO or...

...why are you not transmitting documentsfrom a contractual perspective? All that is lit up based on the innegrationthat we have with your email server in your in your calendar. We've alsocreated a guided selling and engagement, so you might be familiar with theengagement space companies like sales off out reach of really kind ofpioneered. This base, we're in that space as well. So when we talk aboutengagement- and you know somewhat- mass emails out to our prospects buildingvelocitie is absolutely something that is extremely important. As far as themotion of our sales team and then on top of this, we have this guidedselling platform that allows us to keep ourselves raps within the guard railsof a sellcycle. So if my sales team is in a six month year, long sail psychoewith a fortune five hundred company, I have a process and if my sales teamdoesn't follow that process- and let's say they go off the guard rails to theleft, I'll, send them a signal, a warning to say: You Know Hey. This iswhat we've done in the past. That's been successful. You might want to doit this way where they go to the off the guard rail to the right. We mightremind them of the right process to take to make sure that that salesprocess stays on track. So you know between this integration to email andcalendar, our bility to build pipeline and velocity through our sequences inour sales engagement tool and then providing signals on top of that tomake sure that we're reminding our team to do the things that we need them todo. Our saves and eboment platform has become very successful in themarketplace. ISAND is that I don't mean to distill it down to something that isoverly symplistic, but is would you call it sales enablement as thecategory you do all have a category in mind when you're being pigeon hold soto speak. Yeah. I think that's right. I mean stills Ha maybeoment for sure anthat t really sells athing that really...

...started with you know the sales left inthe outreaches of the world that's evolved into guided selling and guidedcoaching right, guided selling kind of was the impetus behind just aibasedsignals and then that evolved into Goddy coaching and now you know this AiBase, coaching, whether it be for my sales team or through signals, orthrough just mentorship, with the ability to understand what's happeningin my ecosystem through information through kind of micromarkets intheirselves, but in general sales and ablements is the space cool. How is andis the how olds the company? You know telp tell me a little bit about sort ofsize, history, whatever you feel comfortable sharing in terms of theevolution of the company yeah me it's interesting. We've been around forclose to fifteen years, and you know: We've been doing email, Colendarintegration for most of those years right, so that's that's where itevolved. Out of, I think the thing that most people companies don't know isthat we have relationships with four out of the four of the biggest crmcompanies in the world. So we do this sink for workl CX. We do it for SAPCRM.We do it for Microsoft Dynamics and, of course we do it for Sales Horce, whichis frankly ninety five percent of our marketplace. But you know we areexperts in email, calendar synchronization. So because of this youknow our SINC engine is always on it's reliable. It pulls the Rahe data. Itgives us the ability to synchronize custom objects and work in communitiesand sales. For so this expertise has led US naturally to the guided sellingin the engagement space. So we've been yea H, we've been doing this a longtime and I'm glad we have because it's really hard for companies to break intothat space and become experts around sychronization of email and calendar.So the ability to get in is really hard...

...and we're kind of making that advantagefor US awesome. Well, I mentioned in the in the introduction, but you knowyour backgrounds really interesting. You've worked at. You know. Youmentioned a few of the companies that you've actually worked at, but walk USthrough. First, how you got into sales originally, and also just the journey,because you've worked at Oracle. You've worked at sales force and you joinedrevenue grid last year, right as the pandemic started, so I'm just curiousthat journey of big enterprise sales companies and then joining a smallerorganization and how that transition was yeah. No appreciate that so yeah Imean I've been sales. My whole life started with Comin called ADP. Mostpeople are familiar with it, which Franklin gave me the foundation forsuccess and selling, and you know going to market, and you know after ATP Ijust I really did get into the crm space through companies like vantive atultimately got up by people soft, and then I transition over to seepl thatultimately got acquired by Oracle and did a couple of startups from there.But always in you know, kind of the crm ecosystem, and then I got into acompany called Toa, which was field service in the cloud which isrelatively new to that marketplace at the time and then, ultimately, we gotbought by Oracle, and then I got into the the Oracle CX game and thentransitioned into sales. For so my career really has been evolving aroundcrm in h in the value of what that can bring to the table- and I think youknow my recent- you know almost three years at sales force was a greatfoundation for what I'm doing now. So I really got to understand you know salesforce and their their go to market and their motion and how they sell and knowwhat their strategy is in the culture of that company. And you know I wasjust so impressed with what they they...

...do in the marketplace and how they runtheir business. But I'm a startup guy- and you know I got the itch again andreally was looking around for companies- that you know have the ability to scaleand grow and provide a ton of value for our customers, and you know a lot ofthe companies that I've been in ave been in nitchi space, these kind ofthinner market places- and this is one of them right, but the beauty ofRevenue Grat- is that you know we ride on the cotails of sales, for so withsales forces. Success ultimately attribute to our success, so I knowthat we can scale as an organization by running on the cottails of sales forseas sals forse grows overseas, you know getting into Europe and Asia. SouthAmerica right well continue to grow in those spaces. So it's a great place tobe in that ecosystem. You know we're an apicchange partner, so that gives us alot of credibility in the sales force world. So when we, you know, we call onsales reps at sales force. We have instant credibility, their reps getpaid for you know what we do and how we go to market. So that's a greatadvantage that we have in the marketplace and in sale. SFORCE is anamazing company to follow out right. If I was to follow one company in theworld right now from an IT perspective, it would be sales foruce. So I think Ireally landed in ha great place, and you know our cultures is a globalculture. We've got employees all over the globe and youknow actually right now in the midst of a finance round and we're looking toscale even more. So it's a really exciting time to be a revenue grid, andI'm I'm happy. I landed here. What was it like joining March? Your running andI didn't realize od love to hear more about how global you are, but you'rejoining a global organization right as the world is shutting down. I got toimagine: There's a bunch of people in the team. You've never met in person.What was it like? You know, taking on the reins of leading a company, that'slooking to big night, its growth as a...

...revenue leader in the middle of apandemic. Well, yeah T at's, that's really hard, really challenging, and I think you know just working in a startup environment andhaving done that, for you know five six companies you get used to kind ofworking out of your home and you know if you're lucky enough to be at acompany that has an office in their town. Yes, you're going to go into thatoffice, but you know for myself: ofve worked a lot in regards to out of myhouse and now that in March march, came around. Our company was actually has headquarters in Atlanta,so we literally shut down the office and everyone kind of opene up theirlaptops and we're inside or our computers all day. And you know from aglobal perspective, you know itis definitely something new and forsomeone that is a a diamond Delta flire. I have not literally been on aplane in a year or so you know those are those are challenging tides and sofrom a customer perspective and a relationship perspective they've goneto the wayside. Right, we've been a more transactional world. I think, andwe haven't been able to do the things that we that make us different from arelationship sales perspective and that's been that's been really hard. Sowill also say that least from our from a technology perspective, the valuethat we can bring to kind of light up the transparency of what our salespeople can do. The pandemic kind of came an a perfect time for us right. Sonow we can see. You Know How many appointments that my team has had, howmany emails have they sent out how many emails and how many emails at out a lotof our companies that now are doing business with us are correlating. Youknow the more meetings I have the more revenue I have, so you can measure thatyou can equate that to revenue. So you know for us, it's been helpful for sure.You know we do want to get back to the...

...relationship selling and you knowproviding that kind of value proposition, because it is a hugedifference maker, but for now we're making Du and we're building technology,that's going to help build transparency, and I think that's a good place to be.You mentioned that you use the word transactional just now toit's talkingabout. I would imagine some of the deals that you're doing have you seenan increase in the possible deal size that you could close. You know insideso to speak, remotely without having to get on a plane or have you do y? U Feellike it's the same to the point of you know wanting to hot back on a plane. Doyou feel, like you can close bigger deals now because of the way the worldworks? You know, I don't think the deal size really matters. I will say thattechnology in general has made this pivot and we've made it quickly. I knowa lot of people in the in the marketplays, I'm very close to thesales forst world, and I see the kind of deals that sales wor Sart doing andyou know literally sales force is in the same boat that I am they're, nottraveling, they're not going to the office and they're doing thent. Fiftyone hundred million dollar deals right, so that is not changed in the salesforce ecosystem world, I think th. The part of this is just making sure thatwe're continuing to sell value. But you know the part of selling value is alittle bit harder when you're selling over zoom or teams, because you only itis transactional. You only have so much time to get on Ha, zoom call with yourdecision makers and your your influencers and the people that areultimately signing off on this. So the coordination of just getting everybodyon zoom is a lot harder where in the past you know we can get on a plane andfly to a customer and in two days meet you know, maybe eight to ten people andround up the consensus to make a decision in that time frame and takehem out to dinner. That's a lot different motion now than you know.Trying to Y. U know transactionally get...

...a deal done, the coordination of Zoomand making it all happen, and the communication through email and chatterhas just has changed everything. So I'm not sure if it's a good thing or a badthing, and I don't think the size of the deals have changed, but theoveralle motion of them have- and you know, making this all kind of digitize.Now, I think, is a really interesting proposition. One of the things thatyou're known for is your ability to recruit great teams, motivate greatteams talk a little bit about. You know your team building philosophy, whatkinds of folks you're looking for? What's really worked for you and howyou think about building a kickass world class team, particularly you know,given everything that's going on in the world mm. Well, yeah, that's hard, andyou know interviewing people over zoom is different than interviewing peopleface to face right. So I think the the power of your network is now moreimportant than ever and knowing people that you know that can sell and thatare innovative people that can deal with a very technical sale in a verytechnical environment is really important. So to me trying to findthose a players isn't is hard. It's just you've got to make sure that youknow they can succeed in your environment and again kind of reachingout to your personal ecosystem to get the kind of people that you know wantto follow. Someone like myself that hasn't changed, but making sure thatwe're filling roles with you know people that ultimately can do. The jobis super important. So if I'm bringing someone new into the organization, I'vegot to be able to sell them on. You know ultimately the success of ourcompany D and, frankly, I think we can do that and it's it's something that wecan do very easily but having you know, a Rolladex of people that you've workedwith in the past, and you know that...

...they can sell. Then you know that theycan be successful. I think is really really important. So experience issomething you know that, for me is paramount. How do you think about thisis a sort of arcane question, but I'm always interested in how incentivesdrive behavior and when you're thinking about building an enterprise, salesteam and you've been doing this a long time and you've also, you know learnedfrom the the best or at least the most complicated, because HEU worked atsales force when you, when you think about building complans like what's theright way, do you have any points of view on the right way to incentivizeyour reps? You know whether it's monthly quarterly annual, whether it'slike how you think about creating the right structure, to drive the outcomesof the business needs. Yeah I mean we're all in in a SASS based world, atleast from a technology perspective right. So I think from an incentiveperspective, you got to try and keep it as easy as possible right make. Youknow he the the base, incentives, simple, six to eight percent and then,when you're over quota, keep it simple and you know raise them ten, eleventwelve percent and then you're going to see. You know that sales team look toachieve and you know obviously look to overachieve on those numbers that yougive them. If you make it too complicated, then you know it's justit's not good for anybody. It's not good for operations. It's not good forleadership. It is not good for the sales team, so my goal was to alwayskeep it simple and then just from a compensation perspective, I've alwayssaid you know. As soon as you trying is you get a deal done. You know you gotto hell, pay the sells raps quickly and typically that's you know it salesforse. They would pay you the next month. You closed deal, and you knowyou got paid the next month. You know for smaller companies. The cashflow isa little bit different right. So you know I've worked at companies that youknow pay the next quarter after or two months after so I think the quickerthat you pay your sales team, the...

...better the sales pan is olde, going tobe and they're going to be happy and the ultimately that's what you want youwant to. You want a happy team that knows that they're appreciated and thattheir Cornia operated, and you know they're getting their money as fast asthey can so to me, overall, simplicity is the KA. Are you also saying thatkind of like it's the company's job, to manage accounts, receivable and andpayment terms meeting the balance sheet? So you know, if there's, if you do atwo million dollar deal, but it's quarterly payment and you it's net.Thirty still pay them for the full value of the deal, even though thecompany won't get paid until ostensibly at least nine months from when the dealcloses. Yeah I mean that that's the goal right and not everyut company cando that. You know when you're, you know a bootstrap company, that's harder todo than when you're you know, stagea or I'm sorry, STAGEB or stage s typeenvironment, so the more capital that you have, the more that you can float,but you know I think it's really important to make sure that the salesteam stays healthy and there can. They know that the company is behind themfrom a compensation perspective. Once you know, sales team stop getting paidor it's taking. You know this sales team five six months to get paid, thenyou know things start to break down and then you know you're starting to losetrust in the organization. So it's it's a bad place to be so tha again, thesooner that you pay your sales team, the better it is, and if the Coif thecompany has to float a quarter or two, I think it's well worth it to keep yourselles team healthy and motivated and sentified to to close more businessyeah, provided they have the Nalenge e Yo doing new business and renewalbusinesses is different right, so renewals are going to be a little biteasier. That's the farming aspect of sales, and you know the hunting aspectof sales. You know is the engine that...

...keeps it all going. So you knowultimately you're going to pay your team differently on renewals than youdo new business, and so that's why it's so important to keep the new businessengine going and that's that's where the incentives come from right. If youcan continue to to pump out new business- and you know renew ninetyninety five percent of your install base, then you starting to Cook Cookwith gas and that's where you want to be last one of my last questions justbecause you've been in the space. So long, where do you see the I meanyou're working at one of the companies? That's part of you know the evolutionof crm and to the point about the integration that revenue greadoriginally started on. You know the biggest complaint I have many peoplehave about S, arms in general and maybe sales for specifically, is that youknow you take an action over here, ind your email and your calendar, and thenyou have to record the action in the Sirm. So now that there's more constantintegration, you can obviously that's that's automated. You can watch theactivity of your reps and you can figure out what they're doing. There'sstill a lot of judgment in the forecasting component of saying, I'mgoing to commit this deal or not, and is this even an opportunity? Do youthink we're going to get to a point where the clrm itself will say?Actually, this is an opportunity and you know you think this is anopportunity, but we don't think so to help provide that level of kind of AImachine learning judgment on a broader part of the sales process, so that it'sagain because even click and create opportunity might be is a huge humanjudgment decision in the same way that logging, the notes, was, you know fouryears ago yeah I mean that's ai in general right, you know slowly, but turely machineswill take over different actions that we do during the day. So I think that'snumber one, it's inevitable when it comes to crm. I think ai definitelyplays a role and I can see it today. It's evolving through different tools.We have an AI based tool that predicts...

...revenue and predicts forecasting rightand that algorithm sore peak is continuously growing andcontentinuously learning. So you know when you put in a system day one thatalgorithm is not going to work so in the only way the algorithm works is byfeeding it with data, so the more data been the more actions the better.Ultimately, the AI and the predictions are going to be, and so I think that'swhat we're seeing is that slowly but surely Ai is becoming more reliable andyou're, seeing that evolved, not only within sales force, but in companieslike ours, you know, there's a there's a product called Einstein within saleswheres, a lot of people know them, and you know it takes months for thatsystem to learn and understand what the actions ultimately you're going to beright. So you K O if you're dying, assassbased system and you're payingfor the first year, you're only going to get value out of that for the lastthree or four months of the first year contract right. So I think, there's alot of question in that, but again it's happening faster and when it comes to,I think you know just overall value of what crm and what then you know withthe the next next place is G. It's going is frankly actionable cn soyou're taking a system and making it actionable and you'r you're teachingthe CRM to make changes for you and advise you to make the right decisionsin the Sall Cycle. So I might get an email that tells me hey neil your deal,that's going to be closing this month hasn't had the right kind of activityin it for it to close, we might want to push that deal out another month or two,so my manager didn't have to get involved. I wasn't like analyzing thatopportunity on my own, this system in the AI started, making thoserecommendations and I'm taking action off that. So for me, actionable crm isreally the next market and then it's...

...exactly what we're in when it comes toguided selling and goded coaching and RAI based technology around signals, soI think you're absolutely right mean this is the this. Is the space to be in?I think it's the next marketplace on top of CRM, because you know, I thinkcram is as good as the data. That's in it. You know when I was at sales forsh.The two biggest issues were data quality and adoption right. So now, ifyou're creating a I to help with the adoption and making it more actionableoff the the data, that's in the system, then the system becomes a better toolfor you so and en that's exactly where this marketplace is going, I love it.It's exciting yeah neilw, we're at the part of the show where we try to figureout who your influences are W, who arepeople can be. We ask you a bunch of questions and apprepiciate aboutdifferent kinds of people, investors, managers, but when you think aboutpeople that have inspired you that you think we should know about you know whocomes to mind. Who are people that you think we should know about? You know I work with you N A lot of investors and guys thatI've grown up with over the years, one of them at Toa, gunnamed, Brucegranjuries now at Francisco Partners Bruce was a great mentor to me, a greatleader to me. We work really well together. We had similar thoughtsaround go to market strategy and he's a guy that I can pick up the phone andask him questions just around. You know operational tools and operationalstrategies, and you know that's his business. So for me, from a mentorperspective, Bruce has been great. I've got a couple ex managers from oriclethat have been great mentors. For me. We spent a lot of time together, justtalking about talent and talking about hiring and talking about building teamsand and being successful and whone of...

...the mechanics of that. So every stepthat I've taken along the way ave had someone to help you along and for me,and I've got a background of sports. I think that's crucial to the overallsuccess and business. I think between sports and business they're, verysimilar actions and motions, and when I'm in business now a team player andwith you know, being a team player, you've got to have good coaches andgood mentors and you got to be able to motivate people. So that's helped me bea better coach and a better leader, the guys like Bruce and Lance from orcal.Those are the guys that kind of helpd me along the way, and you know now. Iwant to pass that forward. So you know you can't do it on your own. It's ateam sport and you continue to to fight the fight.Absolutely Neil. If folks are listening and theyre they're inspired, maybe theywant to work for you. Maybe the want to reach out what's the best way tocommunicate. Oh yeah catch me on my email, which is neil dot ringers atrevenue, griddcom, or call me on Mycell six, seven, eight, five hundred anseven eight, nine, seven, nine and I've always got it next to me, and you know, look forward anyone reachingout and having a conversation. If I can help you in anyway, I'm happy to do it.Awesome, NEL! Thank so much for joining us. We're going to talk to you onFriday for Friday fundamentals. All Right! That's great! Thanks! foree time!Thank you. I every wanted Sam, and this is Sam'scorner, really enjoyed that conversation with Neal ringers,consummant sales, professional hes been leading and really doing enterprisesales for a long time, and you can see that evolution of his career go to astartup. Have it acquired by a big big player Glod to another start up, Havibe acquired. I imagine that revenue grid might be on a similar, trojuctorgiveen, given all those a they work on,...

...and you know what we talked about isreally the nature ind, the future of of srm tools and how what' started, andyou can see it with revenue great as a company, which is what started as asimple integration tool to bring your email to bring your couenterappointments into the Siarum into the database. Now, once you start doingthat, and once you have alborithms as no mentioned, you know, you need datafor those agritm. Once you have that data, then you can start constructingrelationships and then those relationships can make recommendationsand that's where the future really starts to come into focus because again, the biggest problem.Historically, first crm systems was you do an activity, you have a conversationwith a customer and then you have to go. Click log call you know and enter yournotes about the conversation I mean. Of course, that's. If you do that at allmost people don't want to do that. It's pain in the ASS, and so the first step was: let's get that data.Let's have the data be automatically recorded in the serum so that you don'thave to enter anything. You just go bout, Your Business and do your thingand then it will be recorded the next step, of course. Well now we can lookat patterns and now we can see what the best people do and what other people doand we can stop drawing correlations between specific types of activities,specific behaviors and how those behaviors relate to creation ofopportunities and close one deals. So then you can start doing because again,remember all of this stuff was manual right. First, you would have theconversation. Then you click glog, call record thei notes. Then you go intoyour pipelane meeting with your boss and you'd say I feel really good aboutthis deal and I don't feel really good about that deal and you're about to sayyou sure. Are you sure, are you sure, and you say I'm sure, are you sure areyou? Do you swear ye? I swear. I swear okay and then we commit that deal andthen your boss takes it to their boss and she says: Okay tell us, you know,let's look at your, let's look at the pipe one, let's look at the commitwhere we going to come in for the quarter and your boss is saying wellbased on my conversation with my Rup. These are the deals in forecasting.Look at all the human judgment there...

...and, as we know, humans must be stoppedthere, a scourge upon the planet- Earth No, I'm just kidding. But the point isthat there's so much fallibility and there's so much judgment and we wantjudgment we do like humans for their judgment, look at our great ability tonot contaminate the earth with global warming and I'm just kidding, but we dolike human judgment, but we want it backed up by data, and so once you havedata brought into the system once you can say this is what a great deal lookslike these are relationships. These are the deals we think you should forecastand you can forecast him or not. You're in a better place and sales becomesmuch more predictive and the Behavioris, the best behaviors of the reps can bemodeled more easily and also you can more easily tell when you cul, Ur, killa deal things as simple as latency right. Just how long does it take forsomebody to write you back and then what manner do they write you back? Arethey informal or formal? If you are us it, you know if they write you back andit's all lower case and it's very quickly, maybe they're more informal.Maybe that correlates to a higher likeloood of closing the deal, whereasif they take three days to write you back and it's very short and it's allcapital and it's very brusque and abrupt- then maybe it's a deal that youdon't commit or don't full crest. So that's my ran about crn, but I thinkit's a really interesting category and I think neals got the boll by the hornsand I think they're going to do great things at revenue grid. So that's whatI have to say about that. Now. Here's some of the last things I must say ifyou're, not a part of the saleshacker community. Yet why you're missing outany salls professional can join, is a member to ask questions, get immediateanswers and share experiences with likeminded BTO, be sales professionalsjump in and start a discussion with more than ten thousand salesprofessionals that sales hackercom thanks gagain to our sponsor outreach?If you want to see how outreach thos outreach go to outreach, OT, ao forrd,slash on outreach once again, thank you for listening to this podcast to helpget this in front of more eyes and ears. Excuse me: Please leave us a shiningfive star review. If you want to find me, you can linkincom forge last theword o Inford Lash Am f Jacobs and otherwise I'll see you next time.

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