The Sales Hacker Podcast
The Sales Hacker Podcast

Episode 218 · 2 months ago

How to Make a Major Career Jump

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode of the Sales Hacker Podcast, we have Brandon Barton, CEO of Bite and a hospitality tech entrepreneur and expert. Join us for a fantasticconversation about how to make the jump into a technology career from a non-tech career.

What You’ll Learn

What it means to create an incredible experience for people

How technology is impacting the restaurant industry during global labor shortages

The transferable skills needed to make an industry or career jump

One. Hey everybody, Sam Jacobs, welcome to the sales hacker podcast. Today on the show we've got my good friend Brandon Barton. He's the CEO of Bite. He has a longtime restaurant industry veteran and it's a great conversation about how to make the jump from a non technology career to a technology career and why it's actually not such a hard transition after all, because the ideas are still the same, the concepts are still the same. It's still about serving your customer, it's still about providing a great experience, and that's true whether you're working at union square hospitality under Danny Meyer or whether you're the CEO of one of the fastest growing restaurant technology companies out there in the game. So do listen to Brandon. It's a great conversation and he happens to be one of my closest friends. So there you go. I hope you enjoy it. This episode of the Sales Hacker podcast is brought to you by outreach. outreaches the first and only engagement and intelligence platform built by revenue innovators for revenue innovators. Outreach allows you to commit to accurate sales forecasting. Replace manual process with real time guidance and unlock actionable customer intelligence that guides you in your team to win more often, traditional tools don't work in a hybrid sales world. Find out why. outreaches the right solution at click dot outreach, dot io forward slash thirty MPC. That is click dot outreach, dot io forward slash thirty MPC. This episode of the Sales Hacker podcast is sponsored by pavilion. Pavilion is the key to getting more out of your career. Our private membership connects you with a network of thousands of like minded peers and resources where you can tap into dozens of classes and training through Pavilion University. Make sure you take advantage of the pavilion for teams corporate membership and enroll your entire go to market team in one of our industry leading schools and courses, including marketing school, Sales School, Sales Development School and Revenue Operations School. Unlock your professional potential and your team's professional potential with a pavilion membership. GETS STARTED TODAY AT JOIN PAVILION DOT Com. Once again, that's joined PAVILION DOT COM. This episode of the Sales Hacker podcast is brought to you by fresh works. Have you ever been in a digital sales room? Well, if you haven't, your sales team should be in one soon. Gartner and its latest report predicts that of all enterprise B two B sales technology implementations will include digital sales rooms. Create an immersive digital sales environment with fresh sales. With fresh sales, you can develop digital customer journey maps, integrate advanced digital commerce capabilities and to be two B sales, create unified experiences across touch points and enable visibility for your sales and marketing teams. See how thousands of businesses use fresh sales to shorten sales cycle and improve sales conversions faster. Get a free trial of fresh sales at fresh works DOT com. Slash fresh sales. Get a free trial again of fresh sales at fresh works dot com forward slash fresh sales. Hey everybody, it's Sam Jacob's welcome to the sales hacker podcast. Today on the show I'm incredibly excited to have my good friend and estimable colleague Brandon Barton. Let me tell you a little bit about him. He's the CEO of a company called bike, but I want to reach you is is bio.

Brandon Barton is a hospitality tech entrepreneur who has used as experience working at operations at the top hospitality groups to build and scale early stage tech products that help restaurateurs. He has currently CEO of Bite, the best in class digital order and solution for restaurants, leading the company to incredible growth within top QS are brands like chick fil a, Taco John's and Fazoli's. Bite's goal is to elevate hospitality everywhere, and this, Shirley, is Brandon's passion as well. Previous to bite, Brandon was employee number four at Resie, a leading restaurant reservation platform, where he built and oversaw the sales operations departments for the company's first three years. RESIE was acquired by American Express in nineteen. He's a proud CHS alumni and spends his time enjoying family life with his wife, Alice, son Jackson and daughter Jane, who all make guest appearances on zoom meetings. Brandon, welcome to the show. Thanks so much. It was so great to be on the show. That's all we need right just my bio. That's it. That's all. That's it. Then we can go. It's everything about me perfect. There's a thing else to say? Um. All right. So, hi, we like to start the show with what we call your baseball card, and that's just a little bit of an overview of who you are. And but really what bite is? So I said the company called Bite, but tell us in your words, what do you all do? But it is a first party digital ordering solution for restaurants. So First Party means not door dash, not uber eats. WE ARE NOT A B two C company, where a B Two B company. So we create digital ordering experiences on behalf of restaurant brands. And so you may have used bite in the past and not even knowned, because it feels like the restaurants the one producing that or putting out that that product. And so our primary product and the one that has been most successful, where we've been focused the most, um previously, the pandemic and post pandemic, if we're if we are post pandemic, is our CHIOSK ordering product. And so many people may have experienced this in mcdonn if you go that direction, or shake shack if you go the other direction. A Narra, two sheets just going up to a screen and being able to order digitally. We do this for some incredible brands around the country and it has been an incredible ride. I'll say the one thing about bite that's truly differentiating for us is we have an AI and machine learning algorithm that sits behind the product and it pushes suggestions to a guest that might be like that. It goes well with like you see on an Amazon, for example, and those suggestions generally are leading to an increase in what the customer spend. So they spend about more based off the idea that we can give them good suggestions, and so that's what's differentiated us in the marketplace and it's been a hell of a ride trying to run a hospitality tech company during covid yeah, I mean. And so where where is bite in its kind of growth trajectory? You can answer that in terms of over employees, total money raised, a R R like. How should we think about it? Yeah, I mean you should think about us. There's almost...

...like three phases of the company. At this point. We are still in the seed stage. Our next round will be our series a, but we were one of the companies who raised you multiple seed rounds, mainly to to get through the period of covid when restaurants were either shut down or not operating or going through some real struggles and maybe not even even operating inside. So phase one was, you know, basicallyeen where kiosk especially had such an incredible product market fit, and I joined by not as the CEO and joined as the CEO was promoted about six months into my tenure, but I joined because I saw McDonald's and shake chack and Panera all having kiosk that they've built in house and I said, Oh, companies, restaurant companies, can't build this stuff themselves. They need somebody else to come in and do this for them. So so everybody in between McDonald's and shake chack probably needs this product, and we saw that early off. Of course, the pandemic hit and there was a moment where everybody is afraid to touch stuff, which was the best. I definitely had worn plastic gloves to go grocery shopping myself, so I'm in that camp too, you know, as we all were trying to figure out and navigate what the hell this thing was, and so we expanded our product offering to do APPs, to do online ordering, to do some drive through stuff to do line buster, which is when somebody might walk up to you with an IPAD and get your order. So that's kind of phase two, and then phase three really this the third act. Here has been really a refocus on kiosk. There's an incredible labor shortage in the country as it as it relates to the hospitality industry, coupled with, I should say, a steep rise in in minimum wage, which you know, I generally feel like it's a good thing, but it also puts a lot of pressure on the restaurant's P and L so they're looking for ways to automate non essential functions for people. Right. So today you don't have as many robots that can do the cooking for you, although that is starting to come come about. So you really need to focus on having your your folks in the backup house. But everyone understands how to digital order, from from my grandmother to my four year old son, and so having digital ordering in the front of House has made a lot of sense to helpport that Labor problem. I completely agree with you and I think digital ordering is a superior experience in many, many ways, because it's not just that there's a labor shortage. It's that the quality of the Labor when you get somebody in there is totally variable and sometimes you get somebody that cares about their job and sometimes you don't, and the robot always delivers the same experience no matter what. That that is true. You know, people might suggest that the ceiling is lower with the robot. Right, you can, when you have an incredible hospitality experience coming from another human being that is so special and and I'm not talking fine dining, I'm talking about that that extra smile or or somebody you know throwing in a small cookie, as at your coffee shop that you get coffee from every day, like there's some amazing hospitality that can come from person to person. But on a consistency basis. You're right and and actually, as we will talk about this a little bit as we talk about the future restaurants, but as we get into more complex, let's say, transactions, trying to train thousands and...

...upon millions of frontline employees on the complexities of what does this n f t get me, as I am a n f t holder for Johnny's coffee, computers just do that much better. And our quest is to is to make the digital experience have as much hospitality as possible, and this is where I pull from my experience working and fine dining with Danny Meyer and some really incredible leaders about. You know, what does hospitality mean? There's ways to make things hospitable. In a digital world. It's gonna feel a little different, but I think that's the key word. Feel. How does the customer feel when they end the experience and and is that good or bad? That's going to really dictate whether a product has hospitality or it does not. Let's talk about the future of restaurants. How part do you see this going? You know, are we going to be digitally ordering inside? I mean probably Chile's? I would say the answer is probably yes. But like how far up does it go? How how far into quote unquote fine dining this technology intercede, or does it appear in other more subtle ways and fine dining that we're just not aware of? I think it's more the ladder Um. I ran restaurants before there were, you know, point of sales systems. Really, you know, because I do come from that operator background. So I I am the person who is super forward on technology for restaurants, but I also want to preserve this wonderful interaction that you have with your server, with your bartender and so forth in those high end fine dining experiences. I find value, you know, when I go to a casual dining this is more of like your family's style restaurant, family style in terms of the service, but just a family restaurant, like an applebee's or like a yard house or something. Getting that second drink from a digital you know, kind of from a digital screen or from my own phone. There's some value there. But I'm a big fan of preserving what has made restaurants special for thousands of years, okay, which is people being able to embrace the US that's in front of you and give them that service. Now that that leaves a lot of space in a service model where you don't have a server right and you don't have that fine dining aspect. There's a lot of space for technology to help out, Um, you know, on the lower level. So I don't think it goes that far. But I also don't think that we're done inventing styles of restaurants. There's a there's an incredible movement throughout Europe where there are places that serve great coffee in the morning and wine at night, and they become you would never really think about me and you're catching up for a glass of wine at the local coffee shop, like a Joe's, let's say in New York or something like that. But it's happening. And in other places of the world they always feel like, let's say, places like the Far East or Europe or a little bit further head as they've evolved service styles to maximize both the business opportunity and the revenue and the location that they're at and at the same time making more guests happy and kind of evolving. So I don't think we're done in terms of the different service styles, but we can get into where, let's say, did it fits with all this, if you...

...want. I think one place I want to get to is is sort of how you got here, because you mentioned somewhat as an aside, that you joined as CEO. This is the first time you're a CEO. Walk us through a little bit about your background. I touched on the fact that you were the number four employee at Resi, but I didn't mention all of your background and experience with Danny Meyer at at restaurants both in New York and, I guess, possibly elsewhere. So how does how does one get to to where you got in your life? Walk us through your journey. Yeah, it's a little it's a little winding, but look, I think, I think anyone's journey, if you look at the last two things that they did, to add them up and you can kind of figure out where they went next. I give that advice to people that are looking for jobs. One of the last two things you did. Put them together and what what would make you an expert in those two things? What's that? What's that next field? Kind of work that way. For me, I was a bus boy trying to make it make a dime as a fourteen year old kid in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. Proud of my experience at this wonderful Burger joint skin flints. It's still their incredible place to learn. I went to college as an engineer, but I did not understand that I can actually have a hospitality career. Luckily that college was Cornell and they have a hospitality program. Switched over there and then I fell in love with restaurants and beverage and wine and everything. Went to work for Patina Group, went to work for Danny Meyer's Union, score, a hospitality group, and then I felt like there was a ceiling there. There's about I think I was there at the time, but there's eight full service restaurants and the next position after you become a GM I was a service or a beverage director. So it was it was a step before a GM. But after that, what does beverage director do? Tell us. Yeah, sure, beverage director. So Um, you know, somebody that you would see walking around in a suit in a restaurant running the restaurant as normal, but then your additional job, right which everyone else has two to three jobs within a restaurant. I ran the wine list, the cocktail program the beer program and so forth, and it's Um, it's fun. We we had some recognition for our wine list when I was at toabble. We elevated it from like one, I think it's a glass or star in the wine spectator, to two glasses, which was kind of cool. But we created some really interesting cocktails that had a long life and have even hit some cocktail books. So that that was all fun, Um, but really you just work your ass off a hundred hours a week and and you know, go to work and party at night and sleep in and get up and go to work again. You know, that's that's what being a beverage director is, and so so keep going. So you're you're we're working, you're you're squarely not in the quote Unquote Tech Space. You're working in restaurants. How did you make that transition and how did you find reisie in the first place? Yeah, well, no, the first one was a Vero. So it's funny. This is a good quick aside. I knew I wanted to leave restaurants and get involved in something that was just had a little bit more scope. That was that was what I was going with. I probably wasn't going to be a director of operations. There's one person to do that job and eight people who want it, and I just don't know if I had that much of the love to want to be in restaurants forever. I felt like the things that were suffering in my life were like family and friends and my health and so forth. As I said, I was kind of drinking and going out late night and doing all the things that restaurant people do and and certainly financially when you're a restaurant my my restaurant management job...

...was a thirty six dollar paying a year job, which is just unheard of, and so I struggle on all ends. And so I found a way out of restaurants by meeting the CEO of a Vero while he had lunch at the restaurant and he said he got to come in and I was like, like, I don't want to work in computers. He's a come in an interview and one day and just like talk to us. It was an open I had given my restaurant table at three three months of notice that I was leaving. So like, I just I didn't know what I was gonna do next. I almost was the beverage director at Waverley Inn, which would have been fun, hanging out with celebrities and all that, but it would have been fun. You would be right around the corner for me. I could see you more often, exactly, but yeah, but then you know, you would see me never because I'd be working in the business. But in any case, so he said come in have an interview. The next day they offered me about two point five times my salary. They didn't know that at the time. They just thought that that's what it costs to get me to come and I jumped at it and I yet I famously said I don't want to work in this computer stuff. I don't want to work in tech. Yeah, and I fell in love with it. The whole process of being able to te each restaurateur is how to better use text so that they can run their businesses better. I've always been obsessed with restaurants and wanting them to run the business is better and cleaner and, you know, and more efficiently. And there's so, so many different ways to do that and and my way to help restaurants is to teach them what tech is out there that can help them to do that. And I was at a barrel for eight years. Time was up there, I got a phone call. This is actually funny too. I got a random phone call. I thought it was a sales call, but a guy was reaching out, saying talking to me about how we do integrations and things like that. He was passed my number from somebody else. Turns out to me Mike Montero, the CTO of Resi Terra, is famous. Everybody in the New York text seeing very well, non CTO. He's multiple, you know, multiple Eggsit Mike, we call him uh, he crushes. He everything he touched he crushes. So, in any case, I was like Hey, man, you know, this is really complicated. I gotta come in and talk to you about this, and he was like, no, you don't whatever, it's all good, and I was like no, I really do. This is my way to get an interview without getting an interview, and so I went to talk to him and I said, what are you guys looking for people? I know that this is starting up. I heard Gary Baydertruk was involved, which is, you know, obviously an incredible human there's an online personality, Gary V, but Gary Vaydertruck is very different than incredible human being. Any case, I end up getting an interview, get the head of sales role, fourth person in the company, and now I'm sitting, after having years of experience of account management and customer success and sales and enterprise ses and mid market, at a barrow. I got to go put my own playbook in place and that was a blast. That's amazing. How did you manage you have these restaurants skills. Did you find that the transition to because you know then you're in resie. Now you are officially in B two B tech. You know, yes, you're selling to restaurants, but you have transition now to a new industry. Was that difficult? Was that easy? And I asked because there's a lot of people that I talked to in pavilion that are very nervous about moving from X Y Z industry into quote unquote, tech or into quote unquote, Sass. They find that they believe that it's daunting. Sometimes the...

...hiring manager feels like they don't have to requisite experience. Did you feel like it was such a dramatic shift, or did you feel like it's it's business, is business, and it wasn't. It wasn't rocket science. Well, I think I'm fortunate in the industry that I'm in is not very like, let's say, they're they're not earlier adopters, and so in terms of restaurants and technology, and so they care more to speak to somebody who understands restaurants than somebody who understands tech. And so I understand restaurants like I might as well have multiple bachelor and master's degrees and hospitality, based on the places that I've worked. And and so I talked to people about restaurants. And I just happened, like I said, I went to Cornell's an engineer. I just happened to also really understand the tech side of things and how something may translate. And you take a and B and put them together and make Z or whatever, and and can explain that to somebody who might be more focused, more and more right brained, for example, or left brained whatever the one, the artsy side is, you know and and explain to them how these these specific things might impact their business, their bottom line and so forth. So I didn't have that much trouble. But I will say in general, there are so many transferable skills and and and anyone listening that is thinking about like, man, I don't want to go to x industry or Y industry. That's BS like go learn it. You might have to make a lateral move, but that's okay because, Um, you're gonna widen your network so much and you can take any of those those skills, and I think there's so many restaurants. The skill of caring for people translates to everything. So if you care genuinely about the person that you are working with, selling to providing service, to nothing else, matters. Just care about them, listen to them, understand their problem and help figure out how that might work internally and your in whatever your current Gig is, and and so restaurants. You're sitting there selling wine. It's it happens to be similar to selling software. You just don't know that at the time. Yeah, no, I agree, walcuters. How you joined by your CEO the Arney into especially when you don't found the company right when you found the company and it works, you can call yourself whatever you want. You can be CEO, you can be executive chairman, you can be chief evangelists. Who Cares? But when you're not the founder, the path to becoming the outside higher CEO is it's not transparent, it's not immediately clear. It's a little bit of Jiu Jitsu. It's not it's not obvious what you know. There's no clear map. It's you know, you find a way to get there and then you hang on tight. How did you walk us through both the journey to the C suite, to being a CEO, and also would have been the key learning is the key challenges? I'm sure you've grown ten years in the in the couple of years that you've been CEO Bites, so walk us through what you've learned. Yeah, let's started, starting the how it got there and get into the learning stuff. Although, you know, very early in the learning journey I'm still leveraging things like CEO Pavilion, for example, to learn from people who have tons of experiences CEOS. I I still feel like a rookie there. But the guys from bite found me and said basically asked me to con for them, and I look at the opportunity. Like I said before,...

...shake shack's using kiosks. You know, McDonald's using Kas. Everyone's gonna do this. Okay, great, I need to be a part of this. It seems like a big thing and they asked me to consult. I looked at the opportunity. I said, this is not a consulting gig, this is a full time thing and actually I knew going into it that I had more startup experience than than the three founders did and I just was comfortable with that because, look, I'm a VC of one right, you're you. I spend the majority of my time doing my primary job and that's where my investment is. You know, it's not dollars it's time, all of my time as the investment so I get to have one company in my vc portfolio. And so I vetted the product more than I vetted the team, although of course I vetted the team as well, and I thought there was a fit and I knew I might be a little bit more experienced than they were, but I said we'll figure that out later. I even asked them in the interview process should I be talking about being the CEO of this company, and I think to their credit, they were like maybe, you know, we don't know, like we don't care. We want this thing to be successful. We don't care what seats we're sitting in. And so six months down the line, when we this was post Resi's announcement that they were being purchased by Amex, it became clear both to the board and to our the team of founders, that hey, since brandon's been through this and been through a pretty successful exit, now you know like that's that has external validation right, maybe he should be sitting in that other seat and can have a better purview instead of just sitting in an operations or sales in an account management seat. And so I would look, I give all the props in the world to the founders, and not many people would do this and give up power, so to speak, but that that it takes so much self awareness and selflessness and the founders of bite had that. And I think you know, by the way, two of the three founders are still there. One had left for different reasons than no bad reasons. One had left and the guy who was in the CEO position is still at by. His name's Jeff. He's incredible and he's so essential to our team and he, I think, he loves what he's doing. So he's still a founder of the company. He still gets to wear that badge, but at the same time he doesn't have to deal with all the bullshit of being a CEO, which which maybe we can get into that. What have I learned? Oh Man, raising money is hard. I've learned that raising money is not a sales activity as much as it is PR activity, if you will. What do you mean by that? That's interesting. Yeah, I mean look, unfortunately some of these analogies just so they just fit really well. I think if if I was younger and single and I saw an attractive woman, like women could be man whatever in a bar there's a way to approach somebody and it's not like Hey, do you want to go on a date with me? But there's a different way to approach somebody that that is trying to make them want to want you, and that's very different than sales and sales somebody might be hand raising and saying I'd love to check out your product, let me do a demo, and then you're just kind of navigating what are their needs and so forth. But in the situation in VC and raising money, you're really more in that dating world than you are in the sales world, and so...

...you're trying to not come across as too aggressive in terms of hey, I really want to get your money into my company. And really it's like it's like that old like don't text them back thing and they'll be interested. That actually works in the world of easy and it's so freaking dumb. You've heard me spouse on this. It just doesn't. It's just such like optics. And I see companies, especially in my space, that have raised massive amounts of money and they are literal piles of garbage on fire internally, and it's just like everybody in the world knows this and yet there's tiger who or somebody else who will jump into be like here's seventy million dollars to go figure out how to put out the fire. Crap you just fucking said on this I can curse. We encourage it. We absolutely encourage it. I think the PR analogy and the dating metaphor are so accurate because I've always I always said, you know, we're both married, but as a relays to when we were dating ing. I don't do great on cold outreach right. I'm not the guy that can walk up to somebody at the bar and just figure out the right way to both engage and act indifferent. And I do great when they already know who I am before I walk in the room. And that's the same thing that you're saying, which is PR which is how does the VC hear about you but not from you? And if they can hear about you from not but not from you, then maybe there's a point of interest that they have and then you can sort of bring them into your story and maybe they buy it, but you telling the story automatically loses credibility. That's exactly right. And or or you get to know them over time and then they one day they realize, holy, holy, that's that person is amazing, whether for dating or for for that. I'm the same way as you, Sam, like there was no you know, I was not, you know, swap pickup guy. You know what. It came to this stuff. And and that's not what I wanted in life. I've always wanted like a more meaningful interaction than that. And what's funny, though, is that I find that the level of expertise that I have about my my industry of food tech sometimes can come off as like I'm seeing something and I see this opportunity for it's so freaking clear and I try to write about it now and Linkedin. Thank you for the encouragement of that stuff. But the vcs just have like one or two things that they're like no, I'm not gonna date anybody that's over six FT, you know, and that's it. And and then you're you're you're just out. It doesn't matter that you're an NBA star, but it's like I over six fts too hot, like and so it could be these very particular quirks by one person or one firm. It just doesn't. It doesn't. It's not one plus one equals too. It's like one times one equals pie to the x. You know, minus, I over one equals zero to the you know, to infinity. And yet you did clothe you know you the business does, is capitalized, you are running it. So how do you? How do you? What do you attribute your success to, such as it is? I know you're immediately and probably be self deprecating, but but you are, I'm not. I I won't...

...wounds where I do that only in private and in public I'm the best fundraiser. That is no, you know, I'm not like that. I think the success is just one the reps like it's the type of thing where you have to have, you know, ninety conversations. You know, my first couple of fundraises with bite and my first couple of fundraises in life, and so I've learned a little bit of that understanding kind of they can't be a sales pitch and and even how to get my message right. And so you just gotta get reps at it. You know, I I that ten hours thing is so accurate. Like bust your ass on something for a long time and you're going to be better than a lot of people at it. And I I try hard and I work hard and that comes from like my my sports kind of mentality. I've played basketball basically my whole life. I got fortunate enough to play Division One Cornell as well, and you know, you just you kind of find a different gear. You say I suck at something. Guess what, I'm just gonna do that over and over and over until I don't suck at it. You know, that's awesome. That's a great perspective. Brandon, we're almost at the end of our time together. What we like to do? Uh, thank God. Right, I think we only got through. Well, we got through like a quarter of my life. We'll do that where you can invite me back. It's I will. I will invite you back before we go. We like to pay it forward a little bit. We like to ask you, and it's a wide ranging question. It can be people that have inspired you, it can be books, it can be ideas, it can be things that you think we should know about because they're great and they've had a wonderful impact on you. And again, it can be like an old boss or your mom or or a book that you read. But what are some ideas, people are or things that you think we should be aware of that have contributed to make you who you are. I think everybody should read Denny Meyer's book called setting the table. It's about hospitality, but it's it's not. It's about business and I think what he espouses there. There's a lot of lessons in that book that he taught to us in person and happened to put into a book as well. I have a not just your book coming out Sam which will plug for sure, and your impact that you've had on me. I definitely to think of you as a mentor and a friend. In a lot of ways have influenced the way that I do things. But I also have a good friend in Wilgadair who used to run to love Madison Park, which was named the number one restaurant in the world under under his leadership, and he's coming out with a book called unreasonable hospitality. So I'M gonna point to hospitality books. Hopefully there are people listening that could take those lessons and and put them into into their practices, because hospitality is kind of everything. If you if you care about people and you can have genuine empathy and so forth, you're gonna have a happy life. Absolutely, Brandon. Folks want to reach out to you. Maybe they want to buy some bite, maybe they want to invest, maybe they just want to play someone on one. What's the best way to get in touch with you? Yeah, I mean Linkedin D M is. I'm on top of that stuff, but everyone can also hit me up on my email. Brandon. I GET BITE DOT com. I don't mind putting that out there, and I especially love talking to younger people trying to figure out their path and a food text and you're in potentially in your range. Happy to help people navigate that. You know whether they should do it,...

...whether they shouldn't take a plunge or get into sass stuff like that. So awesome. All right. Well, Brandon, we're gonna talk to you on Friday. We've got a new segment this Friday. It's called kind folks finished Friday's it's replacing Friday fundamentals for the fall. Will tell you all about it when we get there. But thanks so much for being our guest on the show this week. Go is great chatting with you SAM. Thank you so much for having me. Man Such a pleasure to be on the show. Talk to you soon. Hey, everybody, Sam Jacobs love that conversation with Brandon Barton, a great CEO, first time CEO stepping into the shoes. He was hired at bite as CEO, as he mentioned, but he got promoted and he's done a lot of great things to drive the company forward and he also just brings that level of authenticity and vulnerability talking about it's not always up into the right and he's managed a lot of these transitions incredibly well. And I also just think it's really interesting. You know, he started off in hospitality but before that he was an engineer. He brings both a structured sort of systems orientation to the concept of creating an incredible experience for people and he learned that under Danny Meyer and he was the beverage director of Tabla, Brandon was, and then he moved on to Rezzie where he built the sales organization almost from the bottoms up. He tells a story of hearing that that some of the top restaurant companies in New York had gone with competitor when Ressie was very new, and so he went door to door and he signed up, you know, some ungodly number of incredible restaurants and resie really is known, as you know, the better version of open table, and a lot of the work that that Brandon did in those early days helped create this outcome where Resi was ultimately sold to American Express in a great transaction, and then from there brandon now runs bite and it's really I think also what's happening in the restaurant industry is incredibly interesting. You know, there's this labor shortage all over the world, in the country, and so you're experiencing these things where you go into shake check and you punch in a bunch of you know, you punch on your order on the screen and then it comes out later and for better or for worse, it's often a better experience. You know, certainly it's it's a better experience sometimes because you have the ability to sort of review all of your options very clearly on the screen. They can they can offer you things. You know, they can say, Hey, you ordered that milkshake. That actually goes great with his hot dog, whyn't whinny. I don't know if those are that's an actual combination, but at any rate, I think what's happening in the restaurant space is really fascinating. I think bites doing incredibly interesting work. So I really enjoyed that conversation. Um, thanks for listening. If you want to reach out to me, you can on Linkedin DOT com. Forward, slash the word in. Forward, slash M F Jacobs. If you haven't given us five stars on the itunes story yet, please do that and just remember to take a look at my book, kind folks. Finish first the considerate path to success in business in life. It's coming out on November fifteenth, but it's available for pre order now. If you can order one or more copies, maybe to give to your family and friends. If you're out there listening in your CEO, you're you're running a larger budget considering buying in bulk and giving out to your all of you, all of your customers. I'm trying to get on the best out of us here. So you gotta sell. I think we've gotta sell like three or four thousand copies to get on the Wall Street Journal Best Seller list. That's why I'm being a little bit of a show right now,...

...but nevertheless, it is a it's a pretty good book. I hope you like it. The messages are good. It's my first one and again sales hacker has a great community. I appreciate you listening. I got a lot of great stuff coming up with pavilion this fall. So those are all my commercial messages. Thanks so much for listening. What where? Our Friday episode is called kind folks finish Friday's and you'll hear it in a couple of days. I hope you like it. Thanks again for listening to the Sales Hacker podcast. Once again, thanks to our sponsors. Outreach, the first and only engagement intelligence platform built by revenue innovators for revenue innovators. Go to click dot outreach, dot Ao, forward slash thirty MPC to learn more. Also, pavilion. Enroll your sales team, your marketing team and your entire go to market organization in Sales School, Sales Development School, marketing school and many, many more. LEARN MORE AT JOINT PAVILION DOT com. And finally, fresh works and their new product, fresh sales. With fresh sales you can develop digital customer journey maps, integrate advanced digital commerce capabilities and create unified experiences across all of your digital touch points. Get a free trial of fresh sales at freshworks DOT com. Forward Slash fresh sales.

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