The Sales Hacker Podcast
The Sales Hacker Podcast

Episode · 10 months ago

136. From the Opera to the C-Suite: Taking the Leap and Founding a Company w/ Matt Klepac

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On today's show, we've got Matt Klepac, a co-founder and CEO of Vertify, a really interesting company focused on revenue operations. They're pioneering what they say is the revenue operations revolution. Matt started his career as an opera singer in addition to being a CMO and marketer. We talked about how to make transitions. Plus, we discussed risk and the guiding principles of starting a company.

One two one thre, three, O everybody hat Sam Jacobs, welcome tothe Sales Hacker podcast today on the show we've got co, founder and CEO of areally interesting company focused on revenue operations called vertify andtheir pioneering. What they say is the Revenue Operations Revolution. So it'sa guy named Matt Clipak. He started his career as an oppera singer, in additionto being a cm an marketer. So it's really interesting conversation about.First of all, how do you make the transition frormeing an opper singer tobeing a CMO, but also how do you know when it's time to take a risk? How doyou know when it's time to take a leap and what are the guiding principleswhen you're starting a company to help you to Elp, carry you on thattrajectory so before we get there, we want to think our sponsors. We've gottwo sponsors today. This episode is brought to you by Mupio. When you getan RFP, do you waste hours, searching through email chains, slack threads andold documents to find the answers? Please please don't do that to yourselfanymore. LUPEO's response software automatically fills in your arth piecebased on answers from past proposals, so you always have the right responseswithout any of the hassle. You can see how easy it is for yourself by gettinga personal walk through today, just go to ruviocom for trash sales hacker totest their automation on your new RFP, that's lupiocom, Ford, ash sales,hacker or second sponsor is outreach. The number one sales engagementplatform outrage: REVOLUTIONIZEIS customer engagement by moving away fromsiled conversations to a streamline in customer centric journey leveraging thenext generation of artificial intelligence. The platform allows salesraps to deliver consistent, relevant and responsible communication for eachprospect. Every time enabling personalization at scale previously,I'm Thinkawi'll check them out at wwwout reached Anao. Have you appliedto join Revon clective? Yet we've actually recently announced a launch ofoperations. Collectiv, you heard it...

...here. Finance LEGALN ITAURprofessionals are need their own community, just like revenue,executives and leaders do, and so we've created a community that isspecifically for operational executives. Again, people that are running finance,legal and human resources or people functions within HIG gresth companiesto learn more. You can go to revenue, colectivecom and click, learn more or building theoperations collective website as we speak, or you can email me Samot,revenut CLLECTIVCOM, but regardless. The important thing here is that Matclipack is up for a great conversation and interview, and I hope you enjoy it. Everybody at Sam Jacobs, welcome to thesales hacker podcast. Today we are honored to have Mat Clipek on the show.Matt is the CEO and Co founder of vertify he's a fifteen year old, nowhe's not fifteen years old, but he's a fifteen year, BTB technology veteranresponsible for executing the company's vision and we are going to dive intowhat is vertify he's a marketer Hart with the unique blend of creative andoperational expertise before verrify Matt built the media technology,marketing and operations practice at RSG media in New York City and beforejumping headfirst into technology. He had the privilege of building ismarketing and sales expertise at the NBA, CB, R, e and icon, to name a few.He has a master's degree from the University of Oklahoma and a BachelorsDegree from the University of Mary Harden Bayler he's an Avid Golfer loverof the Houston Astros who cheat and an accomplished professional, opra Singerand he lives in Austin Matt. Welcome to the show Beks for avive. I appreciateit, Sam and and and yes look. I can't deny that, but I'm a little morer than fifteen,though, to so you know it's all good man, it's all good. So fifteen year,veteran and otherwise you'd be a fifteen year. Veteran fifteen years oldand you'd be ighly accomplished for fifteen. That's right I'll date, myselfa little bit, I mean I grew up with Nolan Ryan and Craig Bego and theseguys with the Astro. So so you know...

...preach eating, but we'll get throughthis to we'll get through this too fair enough. Well, I am a Washingtonnationals fan SA. I take great delight in our victory over you in the WorldSeries Tat las season. Yes, so welcome to the show you're, the CEOand cofounder of vertify. We want to give you an opportunity to tell us alittle bit about vertify. It's doing an incredible thing. So, in your words Yep,what does vertify do yeah sure? Certainly so, so let me let me take astep back and give you a little bit of my background, because I think thatinfluences what verd of I does and so so you know I have a little bit of astrange background. As a tech CEO, I was a an opera singer for thirteenyears, so I take a lot of as a founder and as an entrereneur. A lot of myexperience as a singer as a professional singer and the trials andtribulations of that into kind of what I do within our company. But you know Iwas fortunate to be able to build both sides of my bran, both the you know themarketing, a businessside and the music side simultaneously for many years andas a marketer, I was really sick and tired to being siguitired. I struggledwith being able to align our sales and marketing teams across New York LaLondon Deli all of these different places and with data becoming just thefocal point for everybody. We had to figure something out, and so Vertifiwas basically born out of that problem and at the end of the day, what vertifyis is it's a revenue operations, intelligence platform that turnsdisparate data into intelligent answers for revenue teams? Specifically? So, ifyou think about it, from the perspective of you know, marketing hastheir system of record sales. Has Their system of record customer success? HasTheirs well we're looking at the revenue operations revolution asvertify being that system of record looking over taking all of that datafrom all of those different sources and then really turning around and andhelping marketers sales people customer success. People get the most out oftheir data, get it where it needs to be...

...make sure it's clean and then getactionable analytics to better shape strategy to improve execution. 'Sto,better plan better predict and ultimately have next level revenuetgrowth, and that's our. Why that's the revenue, operations, intelligenceplatform and that's fertify, and is it a it's a platform? So you log into itand it's got its own visualizations or is it a piece of machinery that sits inthe background connecting desprate systems like Marquetto and sales forceor or do all of those plug into vertify brilliant question? It's a little bitof both right. So we have the operational foundational piece, whichis the back in which, which is completely automated, so connecting ofthat data from system to system think about it as integration or connectionfrom crm to marking, automation, to customer success, making sure that datacan a line and be flowing, and that's all in the back in that's all automated,so you don you don't need it involvement, it's all for the businessand then on the front end. You have the ability to log in right away and getget answers right off the bat as a marketer as a salespeople for thingsthat you're spending three to five hours. You know a week trying to buildreports in in these these. These individual systems, sales for S,Marquetto, Hep, spot these different systems, and so we're able to kind ofgive you the ability to get those answers very quickly right up front andnot worry about the operational stuff know that your data is being managed onthe back end and really benefit from the intelligence benefit from theanalytics that are, you know right in front of your base. When did you startthe company like tell us where it's based? You know where we are in the growthprejectory, that all that kind of stuff, yeah H, great questions, so startedabout three and a half years ago in the great city of Austin Texas. You knowwe're fortunate to be in a phenomenal startup environment here in Austin andand doing some cool things there. So we started three and a half years ago. Wehave an interesting kind of founding story as well. When I was living in NewYork, I...

...looking to build this product and founda company in Austin that was a services base. Business had some internal toolsthat they' built for their services, business and ultimately came in andbought some of that and sold into the services base customer base and andthen have evolved. It d built it from there. We boot strapped it for a longtime until the Follo of last year, where we we brought in our first bit ofcapital and that we're actually currently in a race cycle again, butwe're we're north of two point: five million in Arr, and we have abouttwenty two employees here in Austin. We have a couple in Atlanta as well, so sodoing some really cool things and and building around the people. So let meask you a question. First of all, what's your favorite opera? If peopleout there are want to experience opera, what Erdo you recommend, they startyeah. So so you know I could go to some that I am that I sang it right to Labo an mysaying, Laba wem several times it's by far my favorite music pocini opera, butI think a great starter for everybody would be Rigaletto. It's funny. It's agreat piece: IT'S JUSEPPI Verday! So it's a it's a phenomenal composer sostart with Rigaletto. Maybe then move to Boem and and maybe wait for wait forsome of the new age stuff till you get into the the Ar form a little bit fairenough good advice, yeah, and so how did? How did you I mean? What is thelife of a professional oppersoner like, but how did you make the transitionfrom that world like at what point did you say? I need to get into B to betechnolo. How did you make that leap? Well, so I growing up my influence. Iwas surrounded by by really successful sales leaders, and so now my uncle Mike Marabell is his name.He he was a big influence on my life from kind of a business perspective andso going through school. I always I always study both. I study music and Istudy business, and so I always kind of...

...have that working through throughoutthe entire process of my schooling and then moving to New York. You know, Ithink you can kind of I'm obviously an entrpreneur. We like risk we like towould like to take on some challenges and and it's in our DNA, and so I movedto New York with with no job with nothing and started right off the batworking at the NBA, and I also simultaneously got a music gig singingwith a local opera company was Decapo oper at the time now it's city, operaand started working with both and I wasable to juggle- and I was like Hey- you know what I can do this, and so I wasable to build both and and kind of evolve. My careers and I was fortunatewhen I got into technology marketing. I worked with RSD and they they, I don't know how they dealt with me.But they did they dealt with me and they said youknow what we're fine with you traveling ten to to fourteen weeks out of theyear and you we want you to work and build our marketing practice, and itwas a big effort. We were transitioning from a servicas business to a productbusiness trying to grow it all organically and doing some really coolstuff, and- and so we did that and they allowed me to travel, and so I waslabled to work from Italy. Work from Germany work from from you know,Amsterdam or wherever it might have been, and then, when I was back in NewYork, I was in the office and it worked out quite well, and so it'svery different, but singing gave me perspective as a founder as anentrepreneur. I think that really, I guess hardened me a little bit rightwhen you hear no ninety nine percent of the time as a singer and you get up indyou perform in front of three tousand people, you get harder right, so youfind ways to push through you find ways to fers severe perseverance is a bigdeal. Resilience, I think, is a big deal, and so so I think music reallyhelped do that for me and it allowed me when I was ready to do my my thing andtake that step into a complete ownership of...

...you know in the business world. I was ready to do that. I was ready totake that risk and kind of be resiliant through it. It didn't hurt that I atthe same time, had a seven seven week old baby and I was tired of traveling,and so it was time to really go all in you know, and so that was kind of itfor me and how the transition took place. How did you know? I guess you were working with thiscompany in Austin and they had and they were helping you, I guess, with yourmarketing work at RSG. But how did you? How did you sort of like what was theseries of decisions that gave you the confidence to be your own boss and tostart your own company, because I know a lot of people? A lot of people arealways wondering that about themselves is now the right time. When is theright time, of course, people that have done it say it's always the right time,an never the right time. But what are what are the decision points in yourhead because, as you mentioned, you had a baby like how did you have theconfidence to take that leap? Yeah? I think it's the. I think it's the peopleyou have around you. I think it's the support crew in many ways. For me it is,I mean it's different for everybody, but you're right. It's never the righttime. It's always the right time and I've always been one at that's, notshot away from chasing my dreams. Right I mean somebody, that's wearing twohats, chasing a professional singing career and chasing the highest level of success asa marketer. I think it's just kind of in my DNA in many cases, but thatstarted early on my parents were a big part of that. For me, they developedthis. Don't let anything get in the way, attitude for me and chase and always bechasing, and so I think it was a natural thing for me to say, there's aproblem. My team is suffering from this problem. My colleagues are sufferingfrom this problem. Why not me? Why not go fix it? Why not go figure it out andhelp help my collegue right? And so so we were at a good point in life a and Ithink just you take those transitions. You have a new Kido, you have thesedifferent phases in life and some people would say: Wait you transitioned!When you had a seven leek gold, baby...

...yeah, I did and we moved from New Yorkto Austin Texas. It was crazy, but but I think you got to be a little crazy tobe a be an entrepreneur. I think that's just part of it and I like crazy. Ilike weird, and that was it for me. It was. It was never a question of W. isit worth the risk and it's always worth the risk? If U, if you're willing toput in the effort, so I think that that's that's a big thing, so you movedawesome because that's where this company that essentially I guess youare acquiring in some way or maybe- is that how to think about yeah Otifinyeah in some ways, so we we moved to Austin because it was there,but also I mean Austin was where we wanted to be from to build a business.It was e startup Cultureis, phenomenal. It's a great place to find great talentthat want to take chances and work for really cool, smaller organizations, notto mention we have family here too. So that was also a big piece of itfamily's a big back. You know the backbone of of what we do here in liefamily, and so so you know that was. That was a big thing. Moving to Austinwas, for that reason, but but doing the research to find the company that washere and talking with with with that services, business and convincing themthat they had a product they knew they were not a services. They were not aproduct company right. They knew they had no idea how to build a productcompany, but they saw the vision, and so I think what always makes a great founder,great leader, is being able to get people to understand your vision to beable to communicate. Clearly I mean that's a that's a Challeng thing to do,but they they did, they understood it. They saw it, they believed in it, andso what we basically did was we came in and my cofounder and I Wane Lo Vezis mycofouner and he's the product he's the data vision, he's the data guy, I'm themarketing an operations guy, and so so we came together and he was in Austinand we started to take this product an and massage it and manipulate it andturn it into something that had a...

...really good go to market around it andwe were able to. Then you know, buy that product from from the from theservices based business and take it off on our own and go to market. And sothat's that's exactly what we did and and that's why Austin ended up beingit's where we wanted to be. But you know it easily could have been SanFrancisco it easily could have been Atlanta. It could have been Portlandyou just you just never know it could have been New York, we could havestayed, but it was Austin and- and that was where we were supposed to be andthat's where Vertifi was born and we built our entire team on the groundhere from the day one and then we've spread to Atlanta as well. So that'swhy that's? Why we're in Austin makes sense. You know to the point:Family is pretty pretty useful when you've got a little one or two, and youneed some help. If you're working, you know twelve hours a day, as I'm sureyou are yep what what's the biggest lesson you think from and maybe the biggest surprise to, butyou know you obviously took a leap you moved down here. It was yes, you hadtraining as an opera. Singer, yes, you're a great marketer, but therestill is. You know there still are surprises. There still are things thatyou learn that you didn't expect. What are some of those things from you knowfrom being a super early state frunder and from to your point right boots,dropping for a period of time and not raising money and doing it on revenue,yeah yeah. I mean lessons. Learnd I've learned a lot about myself. I think you do when you're when you'rekind of in the trenches with other people, but you know I've always knownI like to like to take risks right. I get to kind of flex that muscle alittle bit, so that's that's one factor. I also have always known I like to movefast. So so you know, startup to you know have have maybe see that clearerthat I like to move with a sense of urgency and that's a you know, that's abig thing, but you know one of the big lessons learn from starting startingthe company and and being in the seat right being in the CEO seat in afounder seat. It's just very different.

I think it's like having a baby. I saythis a lot all the time when you don't have kids and then you have kids beforeyou have them. People are telling you all the time. This is what it's goingto be like the most amazing thing in the world and and you were like yeahokay, I mean my wife and I were married twelve years before we before we hadkiddos and we were like yeah sure it's going to be great yeah, but then wehave them and it just it's transformative. It is a transformativething when you have a child, it's the same thing sitting in the CEO C asopposed to he the CMO SE. It's you can see it. You can hear it. You could talkthrough it. People tell you about it, but when till you're in it it'stransformative, and so you really kind of learn that look you can't you can'tconvert everybody, you can't make everybody happy and so kind of learningthat make believers of the people you can make believers of and you convertand then kind of make fools out of those thatdon't on jump on the train right. That's kind of a methodology here andthen and then the other half of that for me, is when something fails,because if you're not failing you're, not INNOVATIV period, so if you're, notif you're, not failing, if you're not making mistakes you're not moving inthe right direction. So so, when those things happen, when you fail whenHorntalk in the background you basically you basically just look at it,say good and turn that into an opportunity. You know that's a bigthing. Every time something hits you in the face just say: good good. I canlearn from that good. Let's move on, let's go and I think that's some of theone one of the things we try to fuel within vertify and our DNA is thatkind of mentalitis you've mentioned in the past, that youwant vertify to be a camel, not a Unicorn. And obviously you know. We allknow. UNITCORNS, a billion dollar plus valuation raised a ton of money, but-and I think I know where you're going when it comes to camel, but tell mewhat what you mean when you say that you want to be a CAMELN, not a Unicorn,Yep Yep, look being in Austin. We got a lot ofcamera, I mean we got a lot of UNICORNS. We got a lot of folks that arecertainly kind of honed in on top line and that's kind of they enter themarket and they say we're going to...

...we're going to grow, grow growel growan we're going to focus on top line, I'm a firm believer and we startedvertifying, maybe it's because of our bootdrep mentality or whatnot. But it'syou got to look at everything you got to look at both you got to look atbottom line and top line, and ultimately what you really need to dois is focus on the people focus on the people that are going to make thismagic happen. It's not you individually. It's not your co founder, it's not thetechnology, it's the people, and so, if you can do that, if you can, if you canlook at the people number one, you can have a solid technology stack numbertwo and you focus on the top and the bottom line. Then you, let you leteverything else you let success, be a by product of that of putting the rightpeople around you and growing. So so it's not all about hey only thing thatmatters is our topline metrics. No, it's much more than that and I thinkwhat's so important and it's one of the reasons why vertifies grown. Seventytwo percent in covid nineteen era is, is because we do that. We take thatmentality. If you don't you get hit by these environmental factors and manthanks can go oft t at the window, pretty quick. So so I always just said,be a damn camel, be a camel and let success be a by product of you beingbeing focused on topline bottom line and people number one and ultimately,that evaluation will be there. HEU will get there. Does that, and do you sortof mean, I guess to the point of bottom line? You mean don't overhire Bro atyou know a more natural rate, be precious with capital, be quote unquote:Capital efficiant try to do more with less and trust that you're not going tomiss some huge opportunity, because I didn't hire thirty sales people orfifty engineers or whatever yeah. I think I think growing fast. Its greatright had a great conversation with Kevin Kyley from one Trussea, but aforty thousand percent growth. In three years. Forty eight pitout thousandpercent grow on three years. Amazing STUFP, you can move fast, but you knowdon't get ahead of your skeis. Don't get ahead of your skis higher right askpeople, people want to do more, they do and and they want to own stuff- andthat's what you just can't lose Sidt of...

...you, the people around you. They wantto go to bat and and because, because you're going to bat with them right,you know if you're, leading if you're a leader, that's leading by example.That's in the trensers, that's going to bat with your team. They want to go tothat for you as well and, and so people want to do more and so extend extendthat team as much as you can and then build yourself very methodically withthe right SMEs around you, the right subject matter, experts that can takethose things and, and then you as a leader, really put that on them like go.You got to let go if you want a scale. So let go let people let people takethis business to the next level with you and I think that that's what that's,what being camels all about, they really is. Well, I love a good cameon.So thank you for that yeah. It's funny funny, I'm inspirationfor me. So we we started the business, we're allabout billing being a camel and there's a a ranch on the way it's Texas right.So there's a ranch on the way to my house, my wife and I have two acres andthere's ranch on the way to the house. That has camels and I see him every dayon the way home every day. So it's a good reminder for me. It's a sign, it'sa sign from God drive in that's right, so I want to give you an opportunity totalk about this concept of the revenue operations revolution, the revhopsrevolution. When you say tell us you know. Obviously I think we hear theterm a lot. Maybe that's what you mean, but when you talk about what does it mean to you that conceptof the revopsot revolution and hy? Why is revenue operation so important andso hot right now yeah? I just I look. I mean it's alignment, I think when itcomes right down to it, it's alignmentwe've always struggled asmarketers as sales people as success with alignment across the revenue stack.It's all. It's all part of the revenue team right, you've got demand, creation,you've got closing winning and ultimately o've got retention at we'reall part of the revenue, the revenue team and the fact that we are just nowgetting to this point where we're...

...saying: okay, let's, let's reallyconsolidate everybody under a revenue team right under revenue operationsunder a chief revenue officer to better align what is happening between salesbetween marketing between customer success. I think that that we've all been on this search for solong for this alignment issue, we've tried to buy hundreds of differenttechnologies and ultimately were now getting to the place where we'refinding ways through this kind of convergence of this revenue operationsmachine under one roof to really start to build alignment, and it's it's wherebird Verifi was born from, and you know our intry point is selling twomarketers, so marketing managers, marketing directors using our productbut but sales and success are all benefactors because we are deliveringintelligence into sales and intelligence into customer success tobenefit from that, bringing everybody together, making marketing a hero,making sales happy because they're actually getting opportunities to closeat a higher rate, because demand that's being created, is better, it's moreefficient and then success is actually retaining customers that a highe ratebecause marketing bringing in the right people- and so if you can start thereat the demand side of the House and talk with marketers about hey, hey,let's make everything about revinent every metric you are looking at shouldbe about revenet. I GET PRETTY TIRED OF TALKING TO B Tob Marketers and thentalking about building facebook followers and not o being a metric thatreally s important. It's it's a bit controversial, maybe to say that. Butit drives me, it drives me nuts, and so every metric should be tied to revenueand should be tied from from the minute. A prospect comes in the door to threeyears down the road when they're, still a customer and bringing in the rightcustomers, the right prospects and and servicing them properly is what it'sall about, and this kind of holistic...

...revenue team is the only way to do it,and so we see it as being going from these silo groups that were tryingreally hard to be the best at what they did now, bringing that together and andjust creating this alignment across all freet. So just to to confirm what I think you know we,because this is a topic that we've talked about. I've talked about before,certainly alist podcast you're, saying maybe part of it is like uniform setsof data so that we're measuring the same things and then is part of it,like kind of incentives and really confirming to the MarketingOrganization. Hey we're going to measure success for the wholeorganization on revenue, not necessarily on marketing qualifiedleads or marketing generated pipeline, or is that what you're saying are yousaying so yeah yeah know I'm saying that exact same thing right? So so it'sall about the funnel when it comes down to it and if we can get the funnelright from start to finish and then the retention right, then, ultimately, wehave we have better alignment and it's about taking those revenue goals andimbetting them in the minds and in the actions and in the process of of thisthis one team, this one revenue team with this one revenue goal sure theyall have their own individual tasks and metrics. They have to report on, butthey all report up to a REMNU goal and it all aligns with what the chiefrevenue officer is looking to do for the for the organization and andultimately, what's most important is that it aligns with the customer it's acustomer, cetric vision, we're bringing in the right customer and we'reproviding the right value to the right customer and it's kind of comes fullcircle. With that I love it Mat we're almost at the end of our time together,but the last thing we like to do is we like to pay it forward and we gate wein our prep for this podcast. We gave you a bunch of prompt questions aboutlike investors that have mi th. You know have inspired you mentors, coaches,great books, great content. So thinking about you know again, the the theme isin the subject of the question: Is Things or content, or people or books,or whatever howeveryuone interpretet...

...things that have made an impact on youin your life that you think we should know about what are some things thatcome to mine, yeah, great, so good questions? Let me start with just kind ofmentorship number one. I think I've been fortunate to have I've got a roll of DEK, O five or soCMOS and five orso CEOS that have just been superinfluential in my life andliterally daily influence. I've got to call here at three o'clock with withone of those those coaches, but you know Larry Warnock, former C mo turnedCEO many times over, has done great things here in Austin, he's dynamic,he's an amazing, individual and he's a big part of. I think our success hereand my development and Scott able as well and so we've got. You know. I'vegot a laundry list, but those two guys are very impactful in my life and thenjust from a from a creative marketing perspective, Jonathan Bildenhall. He you know he w s. He arbanb is where Ikind of ran into him. He's a hyper creative he's now at Dave, but just itwas a privlege to meet him in person at Adobe summit many years ago, he's abrilliant creative and I love to just kind of learn from him from a creativeperspective. He's done some great seeme things. So if you don't know, JonathanMildon a'll go ead and check him out. It's pretty amazing. So so I would sayfrom a from a business coach and perspective, I've got a laundry list,but hos e those three kind of stand out and then, when it comes to books, oneof the big influencers here avertify is the book traction by Gina Wickmain. Idon't know how familir you are with that with that mat familiar with it, sono yeah, awesome, yeah, ceck check it out, it's pretty cool and it's it's all about the entrepreneuroperating system that they've developed and we've implemented that here itallows us one of the things we like to say our vertifies be a pirate, be apirate! Don't worry about being a navaby person at this point and itallows us to have everybody acting as a...

...pirate, but us to have some some kindof principal Davy processes in plays that we can follow and keep us alignedso check it out. tractions a great book for for entrepreneurs at a milliondollars, a revenue or at fifty million dollars in revenue. It's really amazingand then you know I'm going to exclude your podcast from this, but JokoWillick, former seal, just a a Badass and an amazing guy. He takes I he takesit. He takes a picture on instagram every morning, fourthirty unbelievable,it's unbelievable unbelievable! So I follow him and man is. He inspires me, the the looking at failure and saying good? Igot that from him and and literally try to follow a lot ofwhat he puts out. Therhe's amazing. So if you want some inspiration, if youwant to be inspired check that out yeah, I love the. I saw a twitterconversation with Jacko and someoneas like how do Yo. How do you do it? Howdo you wake up so early he's like well, you know yet one of these things calledan alarm clock and you set it to whatever time you want to want to getup and then, when the bell goes off, get out you get out of bed. But what?If you? What? If you want to hit Snooz he's like, then you just get out of bed. It's literally that simple. I love,really love it. Yeah love it. It's Great Matt's been awesome having you onthe show. If folks want to reach out to you, ask more questions, may be learnmore about vertify. What's the best way, people can get in touch sure yeah, youcan email me at Matt at Vertifycom or you can go to to bertifycom. I can findme on Linkedin Matt, Matthew, Marabella Clepack, on linked in just feel free toping me that way and we'd love to her a marketer. You know looking to to stopwasting time on reporting thut. We start there. Let's just start there andthen we could take it further and, and so just give us a shout, sounds good.We Will Matt thanks so much for being...

...on the sale, socer podcast, we'll talkto you on Friday for Friday, fudamentals fake, Ay appreciate it. Everybody Sam's corner really enjoyedthat conversation with maclipack. Really, I'm super interested in whatVertifi is doing a couple. I think there are three things. Maybe there'sthree things to take away from that coup. For me, you know you can takeaway whatever you want. These are my summaries. This is not so this is notthe word of God. It is one man, one humble lonely, quarantined man'sopinion. The first takeaway be a camel, not a Unicorn. Now I took that to meit's a commentary. First of all, Vertifi was bootstrapped for a longtime, but it's a commentary on capital efficiency, which is another way ofsaying, spend your money wisely. You don't need to hire a million people,even if you phrased money work towards some notion of profitability at aminimum insure that you have good unit economics, meaning on a per customerbasis. The math works that you can build a money machine and that's whatvertifies doing. Certainly the company that iron is doing that you're tryingto make a long journey right, as they say, the Clichee's, a marathon, not asprint and so many cutting out again. This is contrary to what you heare. Soyou know I'm sure Red Offman knows more than me and he'll tell you that youneed to Blit scale. But, okay, I think it's really the market that determinesthose conditions, not the availability of capital. We certainly saw with qb orquipby or whatever the companyes called that you know they had a did. They havea one and a half billion dollars and they blew through it. They were notcamels, whatever the opposite of a camel is that's what they were and it'sjust it's just a it's a thought about spending your money wisely. You don'thave to run a hundred miles an hour if you're not ready to work up to thatspeed over time, a D and learn the market and the business that you're inbefore you start spending a tremendous amount of money. So that's thoughtnumber one thought number two H N: When...

Matt encounters a challenge or anopportunity, every time something fails, he says good and I want to tell you astory about this guy. His name is Yukikawa Uchi and he was a Japanese isa Japanese marathon runner. He came to Prom anen. Some reading from Mucipediaright now after running the two thousand andleven Tokyo Marathon, antwo hours, eight minutes- thirty seven seconds, but the story that I've alwaysheard in I paraphrasing is there was- I don't know if it's the Boston Marathon,but I can just tell you actually yeah. It was the Bosson Marathon and he passed defending champion JeffreyKirwee in two thousand and eighteen. So this was only two years ago and he saidhe overcame extremely ippressive, whether heavy rain, strong headwindsand temperatures near forty degrees sehrenheit throughout the race. Despitethis, he attributed his victory to those conditions stating that, for me,these are the best conditions possible and I have a pinned tweet on my twitteraccount. These are my favorite conditions, which is a paraphrasing ofwhat Ukkalu she said. The point is that every challenge is an opportunity. Iknow it sounds straight forwrd, but flip your mindset, you're not unlucky,the world isn't conspiring against you. You got this. You can do this. In fact,these are your favorite conditions. This is what you love. You love it whenthis odds are stacked against you, you love it. When you know the top selleron your team just quit, you love it when that deal fell through, becausethis will challenge you to step up every challenge as an opportunity to bebetter to do more to step up. So I say these are my favorite conditions and Iam bastardizing the actual quote from Nuki Kaluchi. The third thing is sales,an marketing alignment. How do you drive alignment? You are? You arereferencing the same set of data. That's really important. Differentdepartments can't have different opinions of the truth. There needs tobe one truth in your company, even if that truth is not correct, but thereneeds to be one number for what sales is one number fot recurring. REVUNU isone number for how many leagues we got last month, not three different numbers.There needs to be one number for how many opportunities we created again,it's okay of the it's more important that everybody has the same number.then. That number is correct. I promise you so those are my three things now.Let's think our sponsors very quickly,...

...this episode, we love Them. We love thework. They do. Helping us with our FPS it was brought to by Lupio. If yourteam responds to RFFS, you need to try Lubio's, intelligent platform. It helpshundreds of sales teams answer rfps in hours instead of days sign up for apersonal walk Trough Lupio. Today your sales team wit. Thank you, trust us goto Lubiacom Fortsli sales. Hacker also make sure you check out the number onesales engagement platform in the universe, outreach go. There was goingto say, check them out, but I just said check them out anyway: Check Hem outwww reach ot. If you want to reach me linkoncom fold, slash the wood inforits last, Sam, F, Jacobs, otherwise, email me Samor, Revenu, Clectovcom,guess what I'm Talkig to you next time.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (328)