The Sales Hacker Podcast
The Sales Hacker Podcast

Episode · 3 months ago

169. Becoming a Self Advocate w/ Mike Feldman

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This week on the Sales Hacker podcast, we speak with Mike Feldman, President of the Americas Operations and Global Document Services for Xerox Corporation.

Effectively communicating your professional successes can feel self-indulgent at times but can help your superiors recognize your personal growth & build standards for the rest of the company. Thinking of helping the collective can stave off the feeling of over-confidence and position yourself for promotion.

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Show Agenda and Timestamps

  1. Show Introduction [00:09]
  2. Mike’s Baseball Card [4:11]
  3. Advice to the Younger Workforce [11:29]
  4. How to Advocate for Yourself [17:01]
  5. The Importance of Skills, Grit, & Will [20:00]
  6. Can you Train the Desire to be Great? [23:23]
  7. Mike’s Biggest Influencers [25:06]
  8. Sam’s Corner [27:44]

One two one: three: three: everybody at sam jacobs, welcome to thesales hacker podcast today on the show we're incredibly excited to have mikefeldman mike, is the president of the americas operations and global documentservices. Roseros corporation he's an officer of the company and he's an vpat crex and has been for over four years, so he's just a seasoned leaderof very large organizations. I think all in this organization and the peoplethat that work with him to deliver solutions for zero customers is as wellover ten sand, and so we talk to us about the career he spent twenty fouryears at eloped and then eight years now at siroc. How do you manage anavigate, a career on the modern world and what are the key skills that youneed to be thinking about as you pursue those opportunities? So it's a reallygood conversation. Now, as always, we've got some sponsors. We've gotthree sponsors that we want to think on the sales hacker podcast today, and oneof them is a brand new one that i think you're going to be excited about sowell. Actually, two are going to be exciting, so the first is out reachedoutrage has been a long time to sponsor this podcast. They just launched a newway to learn. Outreach on out reach is the place to learn how outreach doesoutrage when a the team follows up with every lead and record time. Aftervirtual events in terms of in te customers, you can also see how outwhich runs account base plays managers reps and so much more, using their veryown sales engagement platform, everything's backed up by data pulledfrom that rich process in the customer base. So when you're done you'll beable to do it as well as they do had to outreach a io forward, slash onoutreach to see what they've got going on. The podcast is also sponsored byrevenue. Collective revened collective is the key to getting more out of yourcareer. Our private membership connects you with the network of thousands oflike minded peers and resources where you can tap into leadership,opportunities, training, mentorship and other services made for high growthleaders like you, with the revenue, collective membership you'll build deepconnections with peers to expand your expertise and unlocketh opportunitiesaccess, a full suite of training and certification programs for sales,marketing and customer success and...

...unlock over one hundred different jobopportunities. Every week shared between members in a trusted andprivate setting check out more at revenue colection. Finally, today'svirtual selling environment demands a new kind of approach, one thatprioritizes the buyer above all else, as the world's largest professionalnetwork was seven hundred twenty two million members. Linkedin is the onlyplace where byres and sellers connect share and drive success for each otherevery day find new ways to connect. With your bias, virtually with linkedin sales navigator, you can learn more or request a freedom o at business, dotlinkedin for sales dash solutions. Now, let's listen to my conversation withmike feldman everybody eyed, sam jacob's, welcome tothe sale sacra podcast today on the show were honored and excited to havemike feldon mike is the president of america's operations and globaldocument services for xerox. Let me tell you a little bit about him. He's acareer, sale professional. So this is going to be a great conversation, buthe's president of the america's operations and global documents,services for xerox. He was named president effective january first, twothousand and nineteen and global documents services, president effectivefebruary for two thousand and twenty one so recently promoted,congratulations pike and he was also appointed an executive vice presidentof xerox, holding conversation effective january fir. Two thousand andseventeen had has been an officer of the company since october. Two thousandand thirteen mice leads the company's go to market teams in the us, canada,mexico, central and south america to bring xerox es full portfolio ofofferings and services to clients and partners. Since two thousand andseventeen has also been president of north america operations leading to goto market teams in the- u s and canada previously mike served as president oflarge enterprise operations for xerox, he was responsible for a worldwidestrategy offering development operations, marketing sales deliveryand support for xerox as large enterprise operations, which includeddocument management, outsourcing, manage print services, technology salesand content management mike jorn zero in march two thousand and thirteen andprior doing that he spent twenty four years, hewlett packard, where his vicepresident and g m of the managed...

...enterprise solution's business unit inthe imaging and printing groups america's organization he holds abachelor's degrand marketing from pas university mike welcome to the show hey.Thank you so much a i'm good to be here. We're excited to have you and what animpressive background so really an honor for us. I obviously just gave along bio and obviously you work at xerox, but you would like to start withyour business card. Your baseball card, not your business card, is related,though, and really hear about your role, and you know. Obviously, we all knowwho xerox is, but it would be really interesting perhaps to hear how youdescribe the job that you do in the business that you oversee. From yourwords we, you know, we obviously have our own perspectives on surok and thegreat work that they do, but in your words, tell us about the job, and youknow what you're doing to help leads your ox into the next. You know phaseof transformation yeah my pleasure, so i really have two jobs. Then therethere are a little bit different. One is a go to market job, so this is wherei'm in charge of the sales force in the america, so us, canada and latinamerica, and we focus on bringing all of our products, solutions, servicesand software to all of our customers, big enterprise customers, customers whodo print for a living to call these graphic communications customers,either people like staples and office depot and are donnelly and people likecide office, etc and b customers, and we sell direct and through channelpartners throughout the america. So that's that's one role, that's a bigrole that i've had really since two thousand and seventeen will wereorganize the company well and then, as you mentioned just recently, i wasadded. They just added a piece to my portfolio,which is to manage our gobal document services globally for the company, andthis is really an offering and you know, portfolio job, and what this is is allabout the the print and documents and...

...content services we offer to ourcustomer base. It could be something like managing your fleet of printersand multifunction devices, but more and more, it's becoming very sophisticatedaround cloud and security and analytics and workflow automation and takingprocesses and automating them and hoping our customers communicate totheir customers. So it's becoming you know much more sophisticated and morerelevant portfolio and that's been happening over the past. You know fiveto ten years really, but it's really, i think, with all these new technologieslike ai and cloud and robotic process ornamint, it's really picking upsteamed, quite a bit in the past couple of years wow. So obviously, if there'ssensitive information, you won't tell us, but roughly how big is the numberof people that you oversee across all of those different business units? Itmust be in the thousands yeah when you include not only hour sales and go tomarket folks, but also the delivery organization. That is really part ofthis and then all the other functions that you know really thought of lyingin on marketing and finance and hr support, and all of that it is in theten. You know it's over ten thousand people well manso do in this. Theamericas yeah. Well, congratulations! So i mentioned in the in the intra thatyou you've been at sero now for eight years and then prior to that twentyfour years at hewlett packard tell us a little bit about your origin story. Ialso mentioned that you graduated with a degrand marketing from pace, but howdid that lead? You to? You know this journey where now you're one of theleading executives in this whole category yeah, it's been, it's been aninteresting ride and i can't believe it's been thirty years now that i'vebeen working, but i went, as you said, i went to pate university in new yorkand westchester county and, as you know, that is where ibm is headquartered inwestchester county and i was lucky enough in my last year to get a coopintern position with ibm. So i work for ibm during the day monday. Throughthursday at night i took classes in my...

...senior year at pace and then believe itor not. On friday, sody and sunday i was waiting tables at a restaurantwelis, big, very busy very busy year, but work ethic is clearly not a problemfor you. Yeah and sleep was a proper home, but what was great was with ibmon my resume. When i graduate and the internship you know ended here, i hadyou know back in one thousand, nine hundred and eighty one thousand ninehundred and eighty eight ibm was very big, very well respected and, havingthat on my resume, i think, really helped quite a bit and got me theposition or help position me for the position with gila packard and, as yousaid, i went on to work for hp for twenty four years and did a whole hostof different types of job sales, marketing business development andproduct management and moved around with the company as well moved from newyork. I went down to our regional headquarters for the eastern region inrockville maryland so kind of pick myself up moved down there and twoyears later the company asked me if i had moved out to california to the bayarea and joined the server division, which i did so i moved around. I wasflexible, i think, that's you know, sometimes in a career, if you'rebuilding your career, you do sometimes have to be a little flexible on whereyou're going to move and live. If you're so rigid that you're only goingto stay. Where you are, you may limit, you know your opportunity, so i pickedup. I moved it turned out to be great. I had a really great career, an hp and, interestingly, they h p would offerabout every five years they'd offer in a voluntary early retirement, and itcame with a very nice pay out and some bonuses and other things and iqualified when believe it or not. I was only forty five years old amazingbecause i've been there twenty four years and the way it worked was yourage plus your time of service. When you...

...add those two together, if it equalssixty five points or more you qualify and twenty four and the forty five, igot sixty nine points, so i usually qualified and by law they had to offerit to everyone. You know without prejudice, so i got this package andsaid: hey. If you want to you can't- and i looked at it and said this islike a gift, you know i wasn't really at forty five ready to retire, but iwas ready to take this package and take a year off and go enjoy life, and iwind up taking it and five months later i started xerox. They started callingabout. You know a month after i took the panage they heard about it. Someonethat used to work at hp was working at xerox, an hr found out about it andcalled me, and i was delighted to join xerox and, as you said, i've been here.You know eight and a half years now with xerox. Was there a non compete inplay? I mean i don't know, that's that's one of the beauties ofcalifornia. There are no, not compute is the only state in the union wherethere is no non compete, that is very employee, friendly and not employerfriendly in california, and i was living in california at the time andactually because you know it's an interesting question sam, you know. Iknew that if i took the job with xerox, i'd be moving to the east coast and iremember calling up the lawyer there and the hr person and saying so. Idon't have anon competed by move right in there like. No, if you were tired atthe time and your california resident you have, no noncompetitive can go workfor a direct competitor, well wow, and i knew that was that possibility. Ididn't know what the time i was going to work for zero, but i knew it was apossibility and it all worked out. Absolutely it did. You talked about acouple concepts that for folks in the modern world you know two thousand andtwenty one, if you're just getting out of undergrad or just joining theworkforce. If you didn't go to college really through, you know i'm in myearly ties, but you know for people that are maybe one or two decadesearlier in their career. The path that you just articulated is increasinglyuncommon basically worked for two companies. Sorry, if you hear thesirens in the background, that's a new york city. You've worked for twocompanies for you know over thirty...

...years. What do you attribute thatsuccess? To what guidance or lessons are you giving to the people that work,for? You are young people in terms of career management? When you think aboutto your point, you know. One of the principles you mentioned wasflexibility. What are some of the other lessons that you've taken from againworking being so successful, and also not being so not being beset by thevolatility that so many people are faced with often times frankly, whenthey do work one place for a very long time. The next kind of couple years areoften very very choppy as they are trying to find the same fit and culturefit and stability that they had on their previous role. So what do youattribute your success to and what lessons you have for some of the folksthat are listening, yeah, it's a great it's a great question and i'm not surethere's a one size fits all, there's a lot of different dynamics that comeinto play that you got to really think about. First, on formoses, what i wouldsay is you have to manage your career? No one manages it for you. You've gotto really think about what's most important to you and make sure that youthink about that, as you are making decisions on whether you're going tostay with a company or whether you're going to move on and there so manyfactors to that. You know who you're working for first of all is the companyof good company. Do they aline with your value system? Number two. You knowwe work to make money. Are you making money? Are you being challenged? Areyou learning? Is the person you're working for and the other managementteam? Do you like them? Do they, like? You? Is you know our things workingwhen all of that's working well and you know hp, i was there, as you said, fortwenty four years. I never stayed in a job, probably more than three years, iwould say maybe four at the tops- and that was at the very end of my career,where i was in a much more senior role, but i was constantly making money doinggreat things, getting resolved being recognized by management feeling valuedgetting raises and they were offering me. You know other jobs and i movedaround from pcs to servers to printers or within hp, and so it was veryfulfilling- and i remember i was living...

...in california in silicon valley, imoved her one thousand nine hundred and ninety five, with h, w and well time. I said well timed when he had and youwere what was going on in the late nees. As you know was this you know com boostand it was going crazy. You know there was this bubble and i remember peopleon my team leaving h pa to go work for a start up, and i think you know whenyou do that. It's very high risk, but could be very high reward, but there'sthe risk there, and so i was getting off first to and i was looking- and isaid you know you know, there's no short cuts in life and i'm not going towin the lottery. Probably so do i want to toss working for a great companywhere i'm now in management. At this point i was in management, i'm makinggood money and i'm liking. What i do do i want to like risk at all and go andwork for a company that h literally has three employees and you know, doesn'thave office for a tree yet and all that a lot of my colleagues did, i don'tknow that any of them was successful with it. A number of that i knew werecalling me. You know. Two years later we just went out of business. We justfolded with this- that i was really glad. I made that decision to stay. Itdoesn't mean it's always the right answer. I mean there were going to bepeople that well, you know, i know a guy who was, you know, employee number?I don't know maybe three hundred an amazon. He did very very well, so youcan do well, but i think for me i was things were going so well at hp at thetime that i just felt like a gambling that was too risky. But if thingsweren't going well, i would have taken the risk. So i think you just have toyou know play all those. The other thing i would tell you to is: i wasoffering a job. You know. Hp has a big facility in boise ida, that's wherethey make the laser printers, that's where it was all head quired and at onepoint they wanted me to move to boys. You mentioned the syrens in new yorkcity, i'm in new york city too. So...

...that's sires con. I even heading towards you now mikeparlai, a big city guy, okay, i've lived in new york, i lived inwashington dc, i lived in san francisco and i lived in la i don't want to livein boysy and when h p also bought combat. They wanted me to move tohouston. I don't want to move to taxes. It's just for me i didn't want to, andso while before i said, i was flexible and i moved around yes, but it doesn'tmean i'm going to move anywhere just for a job i'm going to do you know whati think is right for me and it's the same thing with zero. You know if they,you know their former headquarters and where we still have a lot of people isin rochester, i'm not moving to rochester. That's not my gig, so ithink yeah, you know you have to. You, have to really decide what's importantto you and nothing against rochester or boys they're, both beautifulcommunities. But you know i don't have kids, i don't have a family. You know ihave a husband, you know so i went diversity and gay night life and i wantto be able to enjoy what a big city has to offer and that's for me. I had tomake that decision. The question underneath it for me and i'd love tohear your thoughts on it, because i do a lot of coaching to young folks andone of the most common questions that i get is. How do you advocate foryourself successfully and effectively, and it sounds like yes, i'm sure you'redoing great work and i'm sure you know the offers kept coming, whether it wasto move to boise or to move to houston or to move to la or wherever it may be,and to take this job or that job, but clearly, there's also an element ofyour ability to effectively. You know- and i don't mean this in a derogatoryor negative way, but position yourself within the context of the corporatebureaucracy. What lessons do you have to do that? Because i can tell you somany, so many people feel they've just been ingrained and unfortunately a lotof the times it happens with women where they're just not comfortableadvocating for themselves because they feel like they might be judged theymight be. And meanwhile my experience is in this. You know everybody'sdifferent, but my experience is that men often are much more confident yestelling people that they're qualified...

...for something they may not be qualifiedfor way. So when so previous president, but the point is what lessons you havebecause there's there's an art to describing your accomplishments in away that doesn't make people dislike you, but still asserts the reality ofthose accomplishments in a way that can propel your career. So that's a that'sa long, winded question. But what are your thoughts on that? No, it's a greatquestion. You! I learned a lesson early. You know it's like when you're a kidyou've learned so much and when you're new in your career. So when i was likeprobably twenty to twenty three, i remember sitting down with my boss andwe were doing like our annual review and he said to me something veryinteresting. He said i heard you did such and such it was some somethingthat i did. That was good. I can't remember what it was. It was so long goover a. I remember i'm saying this to me and i said oh yeah. I did that heknows how come you then tell me, and i'm like i don't know. I literally saidto him. I don't want to like you know, look like i'm bragging and he said tome something that stuck with me to this day. He said you know if you're doingsomething good, i'm not a minor rater as your boss. I need you to actuallytell me and not only to give you credit which will do, but also that we canlearn as a company and maybe we can replicate in other places. So it justwas. I remember like hit my with a ton of brits. I was like you know what he'sright. You know i've got to be able to communicate when things are working.Well, now to your point, you don't want it to be all about you, and sometimesthat does set people off so by sometimes by talking about anaccomplishment, but also talking about the people that were on the team andreally helped you. It comes across so much better. So i think you've got toalso pick your battles right. So you can't, like you, know, every fiveminutes. Look what i did look what i ded look what i did, but when somethingis significant, it's important to communicate it and make sure that theright people know that you're making things happen and you're gettingresults with other people that are on...

...the team. I think that's great adviceand clearly it's something you became you. I don't mean to say that when isay that you've become really good at it, that doesn't mean that you're notactually doing the bigs, but i do think it's difficult obbe. Certainly it'sdifficult for me to navigate large. You know large organizations and do so in away that again build alliances where people supporting me where i can stilldo great work. So it's really impressive another sort of in thespirit of qualities that enable success. You talk a lot about how important notjust skill but kind of will is in the course of the accomplishments thatyou've had tell the listeners a little bit about your thoughts on why skillsimportant, but why grit and will are equally important and how you'veleverage those over the last three decades in sales and executivemanagement yeah. You know, i say something and i don't mean to offendanybody listening, but i always say- and i believe is that you don't have tobe a rocket scientist to be great itself, and i don't mean that in a badway, because you do have to be smart, but you don't have to be a aneurosurgeon, you don't have to be a straight a student. Actually this thisthing around grit and the will to succeed is may be more important thanthe skill you gotta have some skill and you got to bone up on your skills andyou got to improve your skills, but getting up. There's no substitution forgetting up an hour earlier than your competitor and working an hour laterand just being on it and just making more phone calls or more customervisits, checking in when custom with customers when they're not expectingyou to call them, in other words, there's no rp on the street you're, notcalling for the deal you're actually calling to check in on them and have arelationship with them. You know just just doing those things i think goessuch a long way like here's an example and people that don't mean to make amistake. I think make a mistake doing this all the time in my career, when acustomer has called me left me a message asking for something. If i knowthat it's, i probably have to do some...

...research to get the answer, and itmight take me a day, maybe even two days, i call the customer right backand i say hey, i got your message. I'm on it. I got to make a few of the phonecalls. It's probably going to take me. You know another day or sorting to getan answer, but i'm going to get back to as soon as i have the answer, and ijust want to let you know, i got your message and i'm on it. I know otherpeople that get that message. They do all the work, but they forget that onestep to call the customer say i got your message so now the customer fortwo days is doesn't hear from you and they're thinking. Did they get amessage or not i mean? Are they are casia? They still want the company andi think it's so it's this kind of mentality. In my head of never takeanything for granted. The customer is really important. They have choices sotreat them like gold, be on it, be responsive, be coactive and get the jobdone and don't you know then i'll put something on my calendar like the nextday. Did i get that answer because you don't want to forget about it and allof a sudden, a week later, the custom quan said he never heard from you. It'slike. Oh i'm, sorry. I forgot well come on with a calendar, you don't have toforget things, just print down and remind yourself, so this will this gritthis his desire to succeed and be great and have your customers depend on youfor me. It was built in i never really out of like work at that, but i thinksome people do have to work in and that's okay, but at least work at it.Do you think that it's a you know, there's a phrase that i use a lot youcan't put in what god left out? Do you think that you know a desire to succeed,a desire to be great a desire to do great work is coachable or teachable,or do you think it has to be born in you from the beginning? I think it'sprobably a little of some in some. I think you know you got to be born witha little bit of this kind of skill to articulate and communicate with peopleand have some desire to you know, succeed in life, and it's definitelyteachable to. I think it's a little bit of both quite frankly makes a lot ofsense. That's a non political answer. I...

...well it's a fair answer, though youknow, i mean it's a it's. Certainly it would be very depressing if it wasn'tteachable or coachable, and i think, even if it's not it, we should all actlike it is so that, because it's a better world to live in that we achange you're right, i'm sorry to cut you up there sim. I way i think somepeople are just wired totally different to and there's introverts and there'sextra verds and there's people that love celes was people. I hate it, andso i think we spend so much time at work that i've been really fortunate. Ilove what i do, and so it doesn't feel like work so much, and that is hopefuli mean you know you have to really think about her. Where are my naturalskills? What am i naturally good at it? How do i even work at that so that i'mlike rat at it? You know i mean i might have want to been a baseball player. Iplayed a little league when i was a kid, but i'm not willin mate, so you knowi'm not gonna. Be that great. So it's like. Okay, that's probably not theprofession for me. Maybe i can do it as a hobby, but i think you know peopleneed to also think about that and say you know. One of this is not the rightthing for me. If that's the case makes a lot of sense mike we're almost at theend of our time together and one of the things that we like to do. Is we liketo pay it forward a little bit we like to know who are the people, the artists,the writers, the leaders? It can be anybody you want, it can be the personyour first boss, it can be your favorite investor, it can be whomeverwhen you think about ideas or people that you think we should know aboutbecause they helped in form who you've become. What comes to mind? Oh wow,that's a good question. You know there was the actual late mark her. He wasthe ceo of h, p. Unfortunately, he had cancer and passed away a few years ago,but i think he had a pretty big impact on me. It was a time in my career wheni was at hp, where i was really getting my feet under me and management, andone of the things i really picked up from him was this whole. You know ideaof really being on it. Knowing your...

...customers, knowing your report, folio,bringing those two things together having confidence- and i would say hemade a very big impact on me. I think you know certainly people like stevejobs. You know that it's just was so passionate about what he was aventinand doing and really stuck to his value system to build something that had avery different experience. Also is very impressive as well, and i thinkprobably my first, the first person i ever thought of in this context wasprobably jack. Well, twenty was running g e a very long time ago. Obviously,but i think the way he ran that company the way he invested in employees theway he rotated people the way he wrote personal notes to his business leadersevery year. I think these are some of the things that help form, hopefully,the kind of manager and executive that i am today. Those are three three greatexamples mike it's been awesome having you on the show and we're going to talkto you on friday for friday fundamentals, but before we go, iffolks are listening and maybe they're inspired by what you shared or they'vegot questions, or maybe they want to become customers in some way, are youokay, if they reach out? And if so, what's your preferred method ofcommunication yeah? Absolutely i'm definitely comfortable with that. Wouldlove to hear for people i'm on lindon. So there's you know mike feldman therefrom xerox. I think if you, google, that you'll find me pretty quickly, i'malso mike do fell. Man at zeroconf so either way works great, and you love tohear what you think and your viewpoint awesome. My thanks. So much for beingon the show and we'll talk to you on friday for friday fundamentals, okaysounds great: sam thanks, everybody sam's corner another greatconversation, mike feldman is an inspiring leader. He's worked prettymuch, you know, i'm sure he's worked other places that he mentioned, that heworked at ibm and he waited tables and he's been working. His whole lifepretty much, but the two big places are hp for twenty four years and xerox foreight years, and so, as we talked about,...

...i think here's the one thing i want youto take away the ability to effectively document and message, youraccomplishments and your achievements in a way that doesn't appear conceitedor cocky and still enables you to receive the credit that you deserve sothat you can be noted and can have the trajectory in your career that youdeserve, and so he mentioned that in his first one of his first bosses toldthem. If you don't tell me, i'm not a mind rate, i won't know what you'vedone, but also the organization can learn from your successes. So how doyou do that? Here's one way to think about it. The first is, as mikementioned right, the collective it's about the wee it's less about. I trysaying i lessen we more and make sure that you're recognizing all of thepeople that were keys to accomplishing that objective, but the other part ofit is let people know that you're going to be accomplishing the ejective beforeyou work on it. So in some sense it's almost like a br. It depends what kindof format you have to deliver your plan, it you're an individual account rap.You know i might be talking your manager and saying my goal is to closethree hundred thousand dollars this quarter, and these are the logos that iwant to close. Then, when you do that over the next quarter, you are somebodythat now does what they say they will do and your accomplishments are not outof nowhere in a vacuum. They are related to the specific plan thatyou've presented to the team or to your superior. So it's just a framework forthinking about what's a way of telling people that i've done something greatwithout sounding like a cocky jerk, and one of the ways is again, as mikementioned, make sure that you use we but make sure that you do it right.That was his key point like nobody can know that you've done something unlessyou tell them and i'm offering a suggestion or the dendon, which is heyif you present a plan where you're saying i'm planning on doing thesethings. This is what i think the results will be. This is the plan ihave to get there and then, at the end of it, hey remember when i said this ismy plan. Well, here's an update on it. These are the things we've accomplished.These are the things we have an accomplished, but we did accomplishthese things. That's a great framework for tackling that and for not being toooverly self promotional or at least...

...appearing to be, while still makingsure that you get the recognition that you deserve. So thanks. So much forlistening. We've got three sponsors to think by the way. If you're, not a partof the sales hacker community, yet you're missing out any salesprofessional conjoint as a member to ask questions, get immediate answersand share experiences with, like minded sales professionals, jump in andstarted discussion with more than seventeen thousand folks sales hachem.Of course, we want to think out reach the leading sales engagement platform.We also want to think revenue. Collective unlock, your professionalpotential with a revenue, collective membership. Now leaders at every stagecan get started to day at rough eue, collective com and, of course, linkedin and linked in sales, navigator, doing great things for sales people theonly place where all of the buyers and sellers in the world convert andconvene, and if you want that website, i'm going to pull it up for you rightnow. That website is business, dart linked, oncome, forks, lash sales, dashsolutions. If you want to get in touch me, you can let's linked in com fortlash, the word in for its last sam of jacobs and otherwise i'll talk to younext time. I t.

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