The Sales Hacker Podcast
The Sales Hacker Podcast

Episode · 6 months ago

169. Becoming a Self Advocate w/ Mike Feldman

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

This week on the Sales Hacker podcast, we speak with Mike Feldman, President of the Americas Operations and Global Document Services for Xerox Corporation.

Effectively communicating your professional successes can feel self-indulgent at times but can help your superiors recognize your personal growth & build standards for the rest of the company. Thinking of helping the collective can stave off the feeling of over-confidence and position yourself for promotion.

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Show Agenda and Timestamps

  1. Show Introduction [00:09]
  2. Mike’s Baseball Card [4:11]
  3. Advice to the Younger Workforce [11:29]
  4. How to Advocate for Yourself [17:01]
  5. The Importance of Skills, Grit, & Will [20:00]
  6. Can you Train the Desire to be Great? [23:23]
  7. Mike’s Biggest Influencers [25:06]
  8. Sam’s Corner [27:44]

One, two, one, three, three, everybody, it's Sam Jacobs. Welcome to the sales hacker podcast.Today on the show we're incredibly excited to have Mike Feldman. Mike isthe president of the America's operations and global document services for Zeros Corporation. He'san officer of the company and he's an evp at Z X and has beenfor over four years. So he's just a seasoned leader of very large organizations. I think all in the organization and the people that that work with himto deliver solutions for Zerok's customers is well over tenzero. And so we talksto us about the career. He spent twenty four years at Hela Packard andthen eight years now at Sierrox. How do you manage a navigated career inthe modern world and one are the key skills that you need to be thinkingabout as you pursue those opportunities? So it's a really good conversation. Now, as always, we've got some sponsors. We've got three sponsors that we wantto thank on the sales hacker podcast today and one of them is abrand new one that I think you're going to be excited about. So will. Actually two are going to be exciting. So the first is outreach. Outreachhas been a long time sponsor to this podcast. They just launched anew way to learn outreach. On outreach is the place to learn how outreachdoes outreach, where another team follows up with every lead in record time aftervirtual events in terms them into customers. You can also see how out whichruns account PAS, plays, manages reps and so much more, using theirvery own sales engagement platform. Everything's backed up by data pulled from that reachprocess and the customer base. So when you're done, you'll be able todo it as well as they do. You had to outreach that io forwardslash on outreach to see what they've got going on. The podcast is alsosponsored by revenue collective. Revenue Collective is the key to getting more out ofyour career. Our private membership connects you with a network of thousands of likeminded peers and resources where you can tap into leadership opportunities, training, mentorshipand other services made for high growth leaders like you. With a revenue collectivemembership, you'll build deep connections with peers to expand your expertise and unlock growthopportunities, access a full suite of training and certification programs for sales, marketingand customer success, and unlock over one...

...hundred different job opportunities every week,shared between members in a trusted and private setting. Check out more at revenuecollectivecom. Finally, today's virtual selling environment demands a new kind of approach,one that prioritizes the buyer above all else. As the world's largest professional network withseven hundred and twenty two million members, Linkedin is the only place where buyersand sellers connect, share and drive success for each other every day.Find new ways to connect with your buyers virtually with linked in sales navigator.You can learn more or request a free demo at business dot linkedincom. Forwardsales solutions. Now let's listen to my conversation with Mike Feldman. Hey,everybody, it's Sam Jacobs. Welcome to the SALESACER podcast. Today on theshow we're honored and excited to have Mike Feldman. Mike is the president ofAmerica's operations and global document services for Zerox. Let me tell you a little bitabout him. He's a career sales professional. So this is going tobe a great conversation, but he's president of the America's operations and global documentservices for Xerox. He was named president effective January first two thousand and nineteen, and global documents services President Effective February, first two thousand and twenty one.So recently promoted. Congratulations, Mike, and he was also appointed an executivevice president of Zerox, holding conversation effective January first two thousand and seventeen, and has been an officer of the company since October two thousand and thirteen. Mike leads the company's go to market teams in the US, Canada,Mexico, Central and South America to bring Zerox has full portfolio of offerings andservices to clients and partners. Since two thousand and seventeen he's also been presidentof North America operations, leading the go to market teams in the US andCanada. Previously, Mike served as president of large enterprise operations for Zerox.He was responsible for a worldwide strategy offering development, operations, marketing, sales, delivery and support for Zerox is large enterprise operations, which included document management, outsourcing, manage print services, technology, sales and content management. Mike JoinsZerox in March two thousand and thirteen, and prior to doing that he spenttwenty four years Hewlett Packard, where he's vice president and GM of theManage Enterprise Solutions Business Unit in the imaging...

...and printing groups America's organization. Heholds a Bachelor's degrade marketing from Pace University. Mike, Welcome to the show.Hey, thank you so much. I'm good to be here. We'reexcited to have you and what an impressive background, so really an honor forus. I obviously just gave a long bio and obviously you work at Xerox, but you would like to start with Your Business Card, your baseball card, not your business card. Is Related, though, and really hear about yourrole and you know, obviously we all know who's your x has,but it'd be really interesting perhaps to hear how you describe the job that youdo in the business that you oversee from your words. We, you know, we obviously have our own perspectives on Zerox and the great work that theydo, but in your words, tell us about the job and you knowwhat you're doing to help lead Xerox into the next, you know, phaseof transformation. Yeah, my pleasure. So I really have two jobs.Then they're they're a little bit different. One is a go to market job. So this is where I'm in charge of the Sales Force in the Americas, so us, Canada and Latin America, and we focus on bringing all ofour products, solutions, services and software to all of our customers,big enterprise customers, customers who do print for a living. We call thesegraphic communications customers, either people like staples and office depot and our donally andpeople like that, x office, etc. And SMB customers, and we selldirect and through channel partners throughout the America. So that's that's one role. That's a big role that I've had really since two thousand and seventeen whenwe reorganize the company. Well, and then, as you mentioned, justrecently I was added. They just added a piece to my portfolio, whichis to manage our global document services globally for the company. And this isreally an offering and you know, portfolio job and with this is is allabout the print and document and content services...

...we offer to our customer base.It could be something like managing your fleet of printers and multi function devices,but more and more it's becoming very sophisticated around cloud and security and analytics andworkflow automation and taking processes and automating them and helping out customers communicate to theircustomers. So it's becoming, you know, much more sophisticated and more relevant portfolio, and that's been happening over the past, you know, five toten years really, but it's really I think, with all these new technologieslike Ai and cloud and robotic process automation, it's really picking up steam quite abit in the past couple of years. Wow. So obviously if there's sensitiveinformation you won't tell us, but roughly, how big is the numberof people that you oversee across all of those different business units? It mustbe in the thousands. Yeah, when you include not only our sales andgo to market folks, but also the delivery organization that is really part ofthis, and then all the other functions that you know really dot in linein on marketing and finance and HR support and all of that, it isin the ten you know, it's over tenzero people. Wow, you knowhe's got doing this in the America's yeah. Well, congratulations. So I mentionedin the in the intro that you've been at s x now for eightyears and then, prior to that, twenty four years at Hewlett Packard.Tell us a little bit about your or in story. I also mentioned thatyou graduated with a degree in marketing from pace, but how did that leadyou to, you know, this journey where now you're one of the leadingexecutives in this whole category? Yeah, it's been it's been an interesting rideand I can't believe it's been thirty years now that I've been working. ButI went, as you said, I went to Pace University in New Yorkand Westchester County and, as you know, that is where IBM is headquartered inWestchester County, and I was lucky enough in my last year to geta coop intern position with IBM. So I worked for IBM during the day, Monday through Thursday. At night I...

...took classes in my senior year atpace and then, believe it or not, on Friday, Sautday and Sunday Iwas waiting tables at a restaurant. Wow, it was a bit verybusy, very busy year. But work, I think, is clearly not aproblem for you. Yeah, and a sleep was a problem, butwhat was great was with IBM on my resume when I graduated in the internshipyou know ended here. I had, you know, back in one thousandnine hundred and eighty. One thousan nine hundred and eighty eight. IBM wasvery big, very well respected, and having that on my resume I think, really helped quite a bit and got me the position, or help positionbe for the position with Bhilli Packard and, as you said, I went onto work for HP for twenty four years and did a whole host ofdifferent types of job, sales, marketing, business development and product management, andmove around with the company as well. Moved from New York I went downto our regional headquarters for the Eastern Region in Rockville, Maryland. Sokind of pick myself up, move down there and two years later the companyasked me if I'd move out to California, to the Bay area and join theServer Division, which I did. So I moved around. That wasflexible. I think that's you know, sometimes in a career, if you'rebuilding your career, you do sometimes have to be a little flexible on whereyou're going to move and live. If you're so rigid that you're only goingto stay where you are. You may limit, you know, your opportunity. So I picked up, I moved. It turned out to be great.I had a really great career at HP and interestingly, they HP wouldoffer about every five years they'd offer in a voluntary early retirement and it camewith a very nice payout and some bonuses and other things, and I qualifiedwhen, believe it or not, I was only forty five years old,amazing because I'd been they are twenty four years and the way it worked wasyour age plus your time of service. When you add those two together,if an equals sixty five points or more,...

...you qualify. And twenty four andthe forty five, I got sixty nine points. So I easily qualifiedand by law they had to offer it to everyone, you know, withoutprejudice. So I got this package and said Hey, if you want to, you can, and I looked at and said this is like a gift. You know, I wasn't really at forty five ready to retire, butI was ready to take this package and take a year off and go enjoylife. And I wind up taking it and five months later I started zerox. They started calling about, you know, a month after I took the package. They heard about it. Someone that used to work at HP wasworking at Zerox in HR found out about and called me and I was delightedto join Zerox and, as you said, I've been here, you know,and a half years now with Zeros. was there a non compete in play? I mean, I don't know how that's right. That's one ofthe beauties of California. There are no noncompetes. It is the only statein the union where there is no noncompete. That is very employee friendly and notemployeer friendly in California. And I was living in California at the timeand actually, because you know, it's an interesting question, Sam, youknow, I knew that if I took the job with Zerox I'd be movingto the east coast and I remember calling up the lawyer there in the HRperson and saying so, I don't have a noncompeted by move right, andthey're like no, if you retired at the time and your California resident,you have no noncompete and you can go work for a direct competitor. Ohwell, and I knew that was that possibility. I didn't know at thetime. I was going to work for zero, but I knew it wasa possibility and I'd all worked out absolutely it did. You talked about acouple concepts that for folks in the modern world, you know, two thousandand twenty one if you're just getting out of Undergrad or just joining the workforce, if you didn't go to college really through. You know, I've beenmy early S, but you know, for people that are maybe a oneor two decades earlier in their career, the pass that you just articulated isincreasingly uncommon. Basically, you work for two companies. Sorry if you hearthe sirens in the background, that's a New York City. You've worked fortwo companies for, you know, over...

...thirty years. What do you attributethat success to? What guidance or lessons are you giving to the people thatwork for you or young people in terms of career management when you think aboutto your point, you know, one of the principles you mentioned was flexibility. What are some of the other lessons that you've taken from again working,being so successful and also not being so not being beset by the volatility thatso many people are faced with oftentimes, frankly, when they do work oneplace for a very long time, the next kind of couple years are oftenvery, very choppy as they are trying to find the same fit and culture, fit and stability that they had in their previous role. So what doyou attribute your success to and what lessons do you have for some of thefolks that are listening? Yeah, it's a great it's a great question andI'm not sure there's a one size fits all. There's a lot of differentdynamics that come into play that you got to really think about person foremost,what I would say is you have to manage your career. No one managesit for you. You've got to really think about what's most important to youand make sure that you think about that as you're making decisions on whether you'regoing to stay with a company or whether you're going to move on. Andthere's so many factors to that. You know who you're working for, firstof all. Is the company a good company? Do they align with yourvalue system? Number two, you know, we work to make money. Areyou making money? Are you being challenged? Are you learning? Isthe person you're working for and the other management team? Do you like them? Do they like you? Is, you know, are things working whenall of that's working well? And you know, HP I was there,as you said, for twenty four years. I never say it in a job, probably more than three years, I would say, maybe for atthe tops, and that was at the very end of my career where Iwas in a much more senior role, but I was constantly making money,doing great things, getting results, being recognized by management, feeling valued,getting raises and they were offering me, you know, other jobs and Imoved around from PC's to servers to printers, all within hpay, and so itwas very fulfilling and I remember I...

...was living in California, in SiliconValley. I moved there in one thousand nine hundred and ninety five with HPA. Wow and well timed, I said, well timed. Were Yeah, andyou were. What was going on in the late S, as youknow, is this you knowcom boost, and it was going crazy. Youknow, there was this bubble and I remember people on my team leaving hpayto go work for a start up and I think you know when you dothat it's very high risk but could be very high reward. But there's therisk there. And so I was getting offers to and I was looking andI said, you know, you know, there's no shortcuts in life and I'mnot going to win the lottery. Probably so do I want to tossworking for a great company where I'm now in management, and at this pointI was in management making good money and I'm liking what I do? DoI want to like risk it all and go and work for a company thatliterally has three employees and, you know, doesn't have office furniture yet and allthat? A lot of my colleagues did. I don't know that anyof them was successful with it. A number of them that I knew.We're calling me, you know, two years later we just went out ofbusiness, we just folded with this that I was really glad I made thatdecision to stay. It doesn't mean it's always the right answer. I meanthey were going to be people that will. You know, I know a guywho was, you know, employee number I don't know, maybe threehundred at Amazon. He did very, very well. So you can dowell. But I think for me it was things were going so well atHP at the time that I just felt like gambling that was too risky.But if things weren't going well, I would have taken the risk. SoI think you just have to, you know, play all those the otherthing I would tell you to is I was offered a job. You know, each P has a big facility in Boise, Idaho. That's where theymake the laser printers. That's where it was all headquartered, and at onepoint they wanted me to move to Boise. You mentioned the sirens in New YorkCity. I'm in New York City too, so those sirens couse knowwhere you are, Lenner. Forty seven...

...heading towards you. Now. I'mlike Burl. I'm a big city guy. Okay, I've lived in New York, I lived in Washington DC, I lived in San Francisco and Ilived in La I don't want to live in Boisy. And when HP alsobought a compact, they wanted me to move to Houston. I don't wantto move to Texas. It's just for me. I didn't want to.And so, while before I said I was flexible and I moved around,yes, but it doesn't mean I'm going to move anywhere just for a job. I'm going to do, you know, what I think is right for meand it's the same thing with zero. You know if they you know theirformer headquarters and where we saw a lot of people is in Rochester.I'm not moving to Rochester. That's not my Gig. So I think,you know, you have to you have to really decide what's important to you. And nothing against Rochester or Boisy. They're both beautiful communities, but youknow, I don't have kids, I don't have a family. You knowI have a husband, you know. So I want to r city andgain night life and I want to be able to enjoy what a big cityhas to offer, and that's for me. I had to make that decision.The question underneath it for me and I'd love to hear your thoughts onit because I do a lot of coaching to young folks and one of themost common questions that I get is how do you advocate for yourself successfully andeffectively? And it sounds like, yes, I'm sure you're doing great work andI'm sure you know the offers kept coming, whether it was to moveto Boise or to move to Houston or to move to la or wherever itmay be in to take this job or that job. But clearly there's alsoan element of your ability to effectively, you know, and I don't meanthis in a derogatory or negative way, but position yourself within the context ofthe corporate bureaucracy. What lessons do you have to do that? Because Ican tell you so many, so many people feel they've just been ingrained andunfortunately a lot of the times it happens with women, where they're just notcomfortable advocating for their selves because because they feel like they might be judged.They might be. And meanwhile, my experiences in this you know, everybody'sdifferent, but my experiences that men often are much more confident, you know, telling people that they're qualified for something...

...they may not be qualified for really. So it's previous. President, but the point as what lessons you have, because there's there's an art to describing your accomplishments in a way that doesn'tmake people dislike you but still asserts the reality of those accomplishments in a waythat can propel your career. So that's a that's a long winded question,but what are your thoughts on that? No, it's a great question.I you know, I learned a lesson early. You know, it's likewhen you're a kid, you've learned so much and when you're new and yourcareer. So I was like probably two, two twenty three. I remember sittingdown with my boss and we were doing like our annual review and hesaid to me something very interesting. He said, I heard you did suchand such. It was something that I did that was good. I can'tremember what it was. It was so long ago ready. I remember I'msaying this to me and I said, Oh, yeah, I did that. He knows. How can you tell me? I don't like, Idon't know. I literally said to them, I don't want to like, youknow, look like I'm bragging. And he said to me something thatstuck with me to this day. Said, you know, if you're doing somethinggood, I'm not a mind reader. As your boss, I need youto actually tell me, and not only to give you credit, whichwill do, but also that we can learn as a company and maybe wecan replicate in other places. So it just was, I remember, likehivy with a ton of bricks. I was like, you know what,he's right. You know, I've gotta be able to communicate when things areworking well. Now to your point, you don't want it to be allabout you and sometimes that does set people off. So by sometimes by talkingabout an accomplishment but also talking about the people that were on the team andreally helped you, it comes across so much better. So I think you'vegot to also pick your battles right, so you can't like, you know, every five minutes, look what I did, look what I did,look what I did. But when something is significant, it's important to communicateit and make sure that the right people know that you're making things happen andyou're getting result with other people that are on the team. I think that'sgreat advice and clearly it's something you became.

You've I don't mean to say thatwhen I say that you've become really good at it, that doesn't meanthat you're not actually doing things, but I do think it's difficult, obviouscertainly it's difficult for me to navigate large, you know, large organizations and doso in a way that again build alliances where people supporting me, whereI can still do great work. So it's really impressive. Another sort ofin the spirit of qualities that enable success, you talk a lot about how importantnot just skill but kind of will is in the course of the accomplishmentsthat you've had. Tell the listeners a little bit about your thoughts on whyskills important, but why grit and will are equally important and how you've leveragedthose over the last three decades in sales and executive management. You know,you know I say something, and I don't mean to offend anybody listening,but I always say, and I believe this, that you don't have tobe a rocket scientist to be great at sells, and I don't mean thatin a bad way, because you do have to be smart, but youdon't have to be a neurosurgeon, you don't have to be a straight astudent. Actually, this this thing around grit and the will to succeed ismaybe more important than the skill. You got have some skill and you gotto bone up on your skills and you got to improve your skills. Butgetting up, there's no substitution for getting up an hour earlier than you competitorand working an hour later and just being on it and just making more phonecalls or more customer visits, checking in one customer with customers when they're notexpecting you to call them. In other words, there's no RFP on thestreet. You're not calling for the deal, you're actually calling to check in onthem and have a relationship with them. You know, just just doing thosethings I think goes such a long way. Like here's an example,and people that don't mean to make a mistake, I think make a mistakedoing this all the time in my career when a customer has called me leftme a message asking for something. If...

I know that I it's I'm probablyhave to do some research to get the answer and it might take me aday, maybe even two days. I call the customer right back and Isay Hey, I got your message, I'm on it. I got tomake a few of the phone calls. It's probably going to take me,you know, another day or sort of get an answer, but I'm goingto get back to you as soon as I have the answer and I justwant to let you know I got your message and I'm on it. Iknow other people that get that message, they do all the work, butthey forget that one step to call the customers say I got your message.So now the customer for two days is doesn't hear from you and they're thinking, did they get my message or not. I mean are they are in theKasia, they still with the company, and I think it's you know,it's this kind of mentality and in my head of never take anything forgranted. The customer is really important. They have choices, so treat themlike gold. Beyond it, be responsive, be proactive and get the job done. And don't you know, then I'll put something on my calendar likethe next day. Did I get that answer? Because you don't want toforget about it and all of a sudden a weekly to the customer. CourseAy, and never heard from you. It's like, Oh, I'm sorry, I forgot. Well, come on with a calendar. You don't haveto forget things. Just prick down and remind yourself. So this will do. Is Great. This this desire to succeed and be great and have yourcustomers depend on you. For me, it was built in. I neverreally had to like work at that, but I think some people do haveto work at and that's okay, but at least work at it. Doyou think that it's a you know, there's a phrase that I use alot. You can't put in what God left out. Do you think thatyou know a desire to succeed, a desire to be great, a desireto do great work. Is coachable or teachable, or do you think ithas to be born any from the beginning? I think it's probably a little ofsome in some I think, you know, you got to be bornwith a little bit of this kind of skill to articulate and can unicate withpeople and have some desire to, you know, succeed in life. Andit's definitely teachable too. I think it's a little bit of both. Quitefrankly, makes a lot of sense. That's a non political answer. Well, it's a fair answer, though.

You know I mean, I'd sayit's certainly it would be very depressing if it wasn't teachable or coachable, andI think even if it's not it we should all act like it is sothat, because it's a better world to live in, then yeah, gotto change. You're right, I'm sorry to cut you up there, Simian. I think some people are just wired totally different to and there's injured birdsand there's extra birds and there's people that love sales as people. I hateit, and so I think we spend so much time at work that I'vebeen really fortunate. I love what I do and so it doesn't feel likework so much, and that is hopeful. I mean you have to really thinkabout where. Where are my natural skills? What am I naturally goodat, and how do I even work at that so that I'm like greatat it? You know, I mean I might have wanted been a baseballplayer. I played little league when I was a kid, but I'm notreally amaze. You know, I'm not going to be that great. Soit's like, okay, that's probably not the profession for me. Maybe Ican do it as a hobby, but I think, you know, peopleneed to also think about that and say, you know, one of this isnot the right thing for me. If that's the case, makes alot of sense. Mike, we're almost at the end of our time togetherand one of the things that we like to do is we like to payit forward a little bit. We like to know who were the people,the artists, the writers, the leaders. It can be anybody you want.It can be the person your first boss, it can be your favoriteinvestor, it can be whomever. When you think about ideas or people thatyou think we should know about because they helped inform who you've become. WHATCOMES TO MIND? Oh Wow, that's a good question. You know,there was the actual late mark her he was the CEO of HP. Unfortunatelyhe had cancer and passed away a few years ago, but I think hehad a pretty big impact on me. It was a time in my careerwhen I was at HP where I was really getting my feet under me andmanagement, and one of the things I really picked up from him was thiswhole, you know, idea of really being on it, knowing your customers, knowing your portfolio, bringing those two...

...things together, having confidence, andI would say he made a very big impact on me. I think youknow, certainly people like Steve Jobs. You know that is just was sopassionate about what he was inventing and doing and really stuck to his value systemto build something that had a very different experience. Also was very impressive aswell. And I think probably my first the first person I ever thought ofin this context was probably Jack Welch when he was running ge a very longtime ago, obviously, but I think the way he ran that company,the way he invested in employees, the way he rotated people, the wayhe wrote personal notes to his business leaders every year. I think these aresome of the things that help form, hopefully, the kind of manager andexecutive that I am today. Those are three, three great examples. Mike, it's been awesome having you on the show and we're going to talk toyou on Friday for Friday fundamentals. But before we go, if folks arelistening and maybe they're inspired by what you've shared or they've got questions or maybethey want to become customers in some way, are you okay if they reach out? And if so, what's your preferred method of communication? Yeah,absolutely, I'm definitely comfortable with that. Would love to hear from people.I'm on Linkedin, so there's, you know, Mike Feldman there from Xerox. I think if you Google that you'll find me pretty quickly. I'm alsoMike Doc Feldman at zeroxcom. So either way works great and yet love tohear what you think and your viewpoint. Awesome, Mike. Thanks so muchfor being on the show and we'll talk to you on Friday for Friday fundamentals. Okay, sounds great. Sam. Thanks. Hey, everybody, SAM'scorner. Another great conversation. Mike Feldman is an inspiring leader. He's workedpretty much. You know, I'm sure he's worked other places that he mentionedthat he worked at IBM many weighted tables and he's been working his whole lifepretty much. But the two big places are HP for twenty four years andZerox for eight years. And so,...

...as we talked about, I thinkhere's the one thing I want you to take away the ability to effectively documentand message your accomplishments and your achievements in a way that doesn't appear conceited orcocky and still enables you to receive the credit that you deserve so that youcan be noted and can have the trajector in your career that you deserve.And so he mentioned that in his first one of his first bosses told them, if you don't tell me, I'm not a mindread I won't know whatyou've done. But also the organization can learn from your successes. So howdo you do that? Here's one way to think about it. The firstis, as Mike mentioned, right, the collective. It's about the Wei. It's less about I. Try saying I less and we more and makesure that you're recognizing all of the people that were keys to accomplishing that objective. But the other part of it is let people know that you're going tobe accomplishing the ejective before you work on it. So in some sense it'salmost like a Qbr. It depends what kind of format you have to deliveryour plan. If you're an individual account wrap, you know, it mightbe talking your manager and saying, my goal is to close three Hundredero thisquarter and these are the logos that I want to close. Then when youdo that over the next quarter, you are somebody that now does what theysay they will do and your accomplishments are not out of nowhere in a vacuum. They are related to the specific plan that you've presented to the team orto your superiors. So it's just a framework for thinking about what's a wayof telling people that I've done something great without sounding like a cocky jerk,and one of the ways is, again, as Mike mentioned, make sure thatyou use we but make sure that you do it right. That washis key point, like nobody can know that you've done something unless you tellthem. And I'm offering a suggested and the Dundum, which is hey,if you present a plan where you're saying I'm planning on doing these things.This is what I think the results will be. This is the plan Ihave to get there. And then the end of it. Hey, rememberwhen I said this was my plan? Well, here's an update on it. These are the things we've accomplished. These are the things we haven't accomplished, but we did accomplish these things. That's a great framework for tackling thatand for not being too overly self promotional,...

...or at least appearing to be,while still making sure that you get the recognition that you deserve. Sothanks so much for listening. We've got three sponsors to thank. By theway, if you're not a part of the sales hacker community at you're missingout. Any sales professional conjoint as a member to ask questions, get immediateanswers and share experiences with likeminded sales professionals. Jump in and started discussion with morethan seventeen thousand folks sales hackercom. Of course, we want to thankoutreach, the leading sales engagement platform. We also want to thank revenue collective. Unlock your professional potential with a revenue collective membership. Now, leaders atevery stage can get started today at Revenue Collectivecom and, of course, linkedinand linked in sales navigator, doing great things for sales people, the onlyplace where all of the buyers and sellers in the world converge and convene.And if you want that website, I'm going to pull it up for youright now. That website is business linkedincom forwards, last sales solutions. Ifyou want to get in touch me, you can. Let's linked incom forward, slash the word in forward, Sam f Jacobs, and otherwise I'll talkto you next time.

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