The Sales Hacker Podcast
The Sales Hacker Podcast

Episode · 3 months ago

163. Objections? You've Already Lost the Deal w/ Neal Patel

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode of the Sales Hacker podcast, we have Neal Patel, the CRO of Crunchbase, an information resource that we all know and love. We talk about why salespeople need to be businesspeople first and why objection handling means that you’ve already lost.

What You’ll Learn

  1. How to marry your ambitions to create success
  2. Lessons in poverty and humility
  3. Ways to connect the dots so you kick ass and take names
  4. Principles of team leadership
  5. Objecting handling means you've already lost
  6. Who motivated and taught Neal along the way

Show Agenda and Timestamps

  1. How to marry your ambitions to create success [7:04]
  2. Lessons in poverty and humility [9:12]
  3. Ways to connect the dots so you kick ass and take names [11:31]
  4. Principles of team leadership [14:58]
  5. Objecting handling means you've already lost [20:11]
  6. Who motivated and taught Neal along the way [25:24]
  7. Sam’s Corner [28:58]

One two one: Three: Three O everybody, Sam Jacobs, welcome to theSales Hacker podcast were incredibly excited to have on today's show: Nepetehe's the chief revenons or of conch base. It's a great conversation aboutsome of the non obvious things that go into making sales people successful. Inaddition to answering the question, why, if you were objection handling your art,you've already lost the deal which is, and he's got a great, a great answerthere, which ties in a lot of other elements that we talk about during theconversation so hope you listen now before we get there. We've got twosponsors on today's show. The first is, of course, out reach out. Reach is thenumber one sales engagement platform out which triples a partitive Y ofsales teams and empowers them to drive predictable and measurable RevenueGrowth by prioritize the right activities and scaling customerengagement with intelligent automation out reach makes customer facing teamsmore effective and inclusis ability into a really drives results. Of course,we have another sponsor it's a new sponsor its accompany. Some of you mayhave heard of it s a company called Likin. Today's virtual sellingenvironment demands a new kind of approach, one that prior tizes, thebuyer above all else, as the wells largest professional network was sevenhundred and twenty two million members. That is a lot of million members Lincoln, is theonly place where buyers and sellers connect share and drive success foreach other every day find new ways to connect. With your bias, virtually withLincoln sales navigator, you can learn more or request a free demo at business,dot, linen com, full sash sales, dash rations again that your L is businesstot linthicum forward sales dash solutions now without further do let'slisten. My conversation with me at the town, everybody is San Jaca. Welcome tothe salestalk podcast today were honored and excited at when the shownil, Patel meal is the chief Revenue Officer of crunch base, a service setof information and Resources and an information resource that we all knowand love as Cro. Neil leads the business development, strategicpartnerships, sales, customer success...

...and customer experience. Organizationsin this role, Neal and his organization of contributed to tripling thecompany's unique users increasing annual recurring revenue by over twentyx and landing partnerships with large brands like Lindon Oracle, YahuBusiness, insider Amazon and snow flee nail has over two decades of dealmaking good a market experience specifically focusing on executingprogressive growth strategies, landing strategic partnerships and buildingrevenue generating streams before joining crunch base. In two thousandand Sixteen Neil spent a little over eight years of Google working onvarious business development and GT initiatives, including leading globalpartnerships for Google search growing market footprint for Google fibre andhelping to expand Google maps and neel. Welcome to the show thank an brats,veer or excited to have you. So we start with your baseball card. We knowyour Sero of crunch base, I kind of mangled the description there at theintro and I'm sure there's a more sussin way of characterizing it. Butlet's say there's somebody out there in the world somewhere that hasn't hurt ordoesn't know what crutch basis. How would you describe what you will doyeah sure, so crucis is really the only recently accessible place on theInternet, where you can go to or find organize normalize information aboutcompanies and that's relevant to any business person who interacts withcompanies or seeks opportunities with companies, so that could be salespeople trying to sell. It could be the other side of it buyers trying to buythings. It could be investors and aspens trying to effect with each other.It could be job seekers, recruiters, market researchers and so on, and ourwhat we're trying to do a crush basis, basically unlock access to thisinformation and help people pursue those opportunities. That's our missionand that's why we show up to work every day. Well, that's awesome and then, asa frequent user. I am appreciative of the service and of the the informationthat you make public because it's otherwise to your point incrediblydifficult to find it. How big is the organization you know? I know aboutcrunch bases as a you know, as the...

...service that I use. But what's thecompany like? How big is it how big's your sales team? What are you sellingexactly? Those are interesting questions for us yeah sure, so we wereabout a little of a hundred and fifty employees now and growing. So that'sthat number is a moving target up upwards every day and he, the kind ofrevenue or is, is about twenty five percent. To that fish, maybe a littlebit more, and you know I think you ask what we sell is that right is a yeahyeah, because I'm not sure is it sponsorship. Is it paid? Member showgreat etre, great question, great questions, so so, as I mention like,what we try to do is help people find companies that they should be pursuingopportunity with understand and gain insights about those companies.Sometimes we recommend companies to people and then we help them connectwith those companies and ultimately engage and close opportunities andwhatever context is whether you're, obviously in sales or, if you're, aninvestor or as faering. If Your Business Development team trying tofind partners, job seekers and so on and the way we what we the services, weprovide to enable people to do that our kind of span ifer. If you will so weoffer a free service. So you can just come to crunch base and check out ourprofiles of companies and, if that helps, you understand a little bit moreabout the company, your leader, looking to do to pursue an opportunity withthat's great. If you find a new company, that's great and you can go off and getsome value at a crunch base. Then, and we were happy to help you with that. Ifyou want a little bit for more functionality, we ask people toregister, that's also free, obviously in in certain a monetary sense when youregister, we, obviously let us know a little bit about you and therefore wecan like recommend better experience for you in theproduct showcase the companies that we think you might care about, and we needlead to create lists and things like that, save lists and so on. Then itjust follows: sort of a premium path where, if you want, if you want evenmore functional by more access to different things, we have a starterskew, tell people get give a little bit more value, what we're doing and thenone of the top use cases on Sun priface...

...are sales people trying to get thoseinsights about companies trying to build their prospecting lists andtrying to engage with those prospects, and we have. We have a product, that'stailor for them, which is called crunches pro, that's great for peoplethat want to come to crush, face and and utilize our platform and engagewithin our platform and sort of like conduct our work flow within our popplatform. But we also have a lot of people who already have their own toolsand really arcs in working with PUTRAS. From a perspective of Hey, can you kindof get? Can you integrate with the tools that I have so your data feeds mytools and we integrate BI application integrations that we built and youcould also integrate, but by licensing or API and our datas directly and andthen ingesting your internal tools to help you do the things that I talkedabout before or, alternatively, you may want to build your own application ontop of crunch base, and we let you do that too. So, I'm kind to of crunchesstate. We let you do that too. So you can come to crunch, face, take our dataand build your own product and help the world in different ways. Whatever weuse you deem voluble based on the information crunches has, that is acomplete and real bus, description and illuminating. So so thank you for that.You've been there a long time, you've been there since two thousand andsixteen, but we're always curious how people got into sort of the the journeyof revenue leadership in the first place. I also mentioned, of course,that you were answera partnerships at Google and you spent a long time atGoogle. But how did you first enter the go to market field and what's yourbackground that led you here yeah a great question my background. I I'd love to tell you that you knowfifteen years ago or twenty years ago I had. I had a vision for exactly what Iwas going to do and I was going to be a CRO Winday, but that's a total lie. Idon't even think there was a. There was a job title, creating it's Pretty News, so I've been forcat enough to havepeople around me in my life and have opportunities hot themselves up whereit's enabled me to really pursue some things that I thought were interestingand skill set that I thought were valuable to add to me like to makemyself just more better business person...

...and many in some case just a betterperson. So you know my path, you can you guys you can see from Linkin andsuch I was an engineer who then went to law school. You know I, basically Iliked math and science and therefore I became the came an engineer, but I alsorecognized that there were things that were hard for me number one, persuadingpeople to do things or reading writing persuasively. I was a little shy, soyou know like like any any wise person. I chose a lot better way to develop inthose areas than go to law school and get and jump into the fire, but it allserious, as I also recognized that you know there was just coming from youknow my high brack ground. My whole family, like Bellan, really was alawyer in the United States and our families here by scented families here,and so I thought it would be good for someone in the family to understandunderstand the law. Understand policy understand how things worked on at atthat level here, and so it's a good marriage at those two, the two likeambitions I had, I probably saw for a while. I liked a lot, but not what Ifind myself being more interested in the business side of the transactionthat I was working on. Why was this company acquiring that company? Why Iwas Jus confite getting funding? What were you doing? That was the work thatyou were doing in the law, you're doing the corporate transaction, yourcorporate attorney, that's correct, yeah yeah and it was great but againlike, as as I, as my interest became more aligned with the business I thinkor started to sort of gravitation. This is side o things. I realize that.That's that's probably where I want the kind of space I wanted to be in and tobe honest at that time I didn't even know: We'd go to market met, much less like anything beyond that, Ididn't even know what kind of like what kind of industry I would valuable andwhat role I would be valuable in, and so I took some time to think thatthrough and long story short, I decided what better way to get exposure and andbecome good at business than to start my own company. So I wisely started acompany with this idea that I had with a few friends. It wasn't a financial, asuccess, but it was great learning and...

...it led me to a place where I could talkto some people from Google and dated opportunity to join Google mapsearly on in a business devore to help to build that PAT. What was thatcompany that you started? We made it's gone now as the song gone, but we madeorganic sustainable, made children's close with an Eastern Asian aesthetic,so I called a baby diesel with a side of Masala. I mean that it sounds like I'm sure,there's a market for that. That was it was it just lack of resources, or whatdo you attribute it was? I would love to tell you that you know we startedthe company. I loto tell you. I was Ra lack of resources or other things thatthere were. There were a few things that didn't go our way, but one of themwas simply timing and also just so some son mistakes. We make we made along theway to be honest, but there were good lessons learned. You know my co findersin that business were still super tight. We've all gone on to do other things,and- and I think we look back upon that time- pretty like with smiles on ourfaces because it was, it was really fun and and made us appreciate some of thethings we didn't know we didn't know. I started a business when I first gotout of UNDERGRAD and I call those days it failed, as my business failed and Icalled it the bad old days when I refer to it, that's right, Ri. I learned alot lessons and poverty and humility. That's what I say: That's exactly rightacts you got to google and you join the Google maps team, but still in this inthis history, there's no like formal kind of go to market training or salestraining, and yet it's pretty clear that you've become really really goodat it over the last decade or so. What was the moment that crystallize sort ofsaid? Oh, I get it, I'm a there's, a new thing called chief REVAN officer orhead of sales or head of revenue. That's the person that I am. I helpcompanies grow there, revenant yeah it continued to follow that path of me.Just opening up my eyes to different...

...different things. I wanted to get goodat so at Google. Like I started doing, it was obviously this is developmentpeople maps, which involved a lot of things that were analogous to what Iwas doing as a lawyer and in a business other which was thinking about markets.What markets to go to why they were important markets taking resource theGoogle gave us and trying to figure out how to expand the product or theproduct doing deal structuring, deals, negotiating deals working with partnersafter the deals to make sure things were working. The way we both contendedand in many ways like I was, I was selling right, you're always sellinglike actually somebody was just telling me yesterday, like even a doctor cells,they got to sell a surgeon, has to sell you on the idea of them. Cutting you upan, and I realized that that skill was was something that was there and manypeople that were higher up at people and even peers that I just respected.And so I started trying to find ways where you know. I could just learnabout learn about sales and learn about customers. I got really good at Bisebipartnerships and understanding markets and market penetration. Things likethat, but but I really wanted to get into that other side of the businesswhich is which was like quite frankly. Just how do you set up repeatablescalable ways to make money right, and that led me to doing things likeadvising startups on that front, and you know Google still love that companythere's a great place and met a lot of great people. That taught me lots ofgreat lessons so between those two kind of avenues. I didn't have like a momentwhere I was like. Oh, this would be something cool to do, but anopportunity surface to leave to go, join a start up and be a becret, so Ileft then joined that start up and it was a brief sent as a Sara as adifferent kind of company. We was mostly large deal driven, which kind ofmarried well with my busines experience, but we sold the company really fastafter I joined, and then I had another opportunity service at crunch base andthat's when it all kind of came together where my build up. If you likeall the dots that I have a using an old steve jobs, graduation speech Capitata,I kind of at that moment I was like well. I can connect my dots here. Allthese different different skills and...

...experiences I've had crunch base is thetype of company, and the people here are that are like h, there's anopportunity where I could. I can really fit well here and I could add a lot ofvalue and I could learn a lot and that's when the PAT started to to kindof for me being like yeah. This is this is opportunity to pursue, and luckily Igot the job, and here we are and five years later, you're a kicking, ass andtaking names. Well, that's a that's an awesomeawesome journey and you, you know you've seen so many differentperspectives and I guess I'm curious. You know when you think about the younow run an organization. I guess twenty five percent of you know o hundred andfifty is, I don't know forty five people, I guess or or forty in maybeit's not at thirty five people, but it's a lot of people yea right. I thinkI met at the percentage wrong it's about for ye some to endre and fortyfive fish people is a there's. My bad math saves me again all right a lucky,then right, that's agree completely. What do you? What have you learned interms of leading teams in terms of the principles that you use to coach andlead these, these people, how you teach them? I know that one of the thingsthat you've talked about is they need to be business people first, what areyour principles of leadership as you think about leading rough andorganization? Yeah, good question, so just in terms of principles, I thinkit's really it's a few things. You know, I think, first and foremost, like Ilearned along the way to really like my I do best when I'm vot. I am radicallyauthentic. Like you talk to my team like they will there is, there are nodifferent versions of meal. I am who I am and and and I'm supersuper authentic. I had sometimes to a flaw, but I believe like that is thefoundation from which I can become a good leader, and I know people throwaround the word be authentic, a lot these days, but you really have tounderstand. Cathetic come comes in my manifest in many places right, so Ilike Sall jokes, I like to be funny I...

...like to I like to make fun of people.Sometimes you know hopefully n a good way. I'm also a self deprecating. I'vefolded that into my leadership, stuff right and I bring it up and every dayconversations you know, I'm also highly highly, sometimes overly energetic.Sometimes I don't try to hide that step. I just muled my leadership style aroundthose things that naturally just occur in me and I think that's important andit you know there's times in the past, where I have a Ben Ative leader andmany times it's because I was trying to be somebody that I wasn't so I thinkthat's a one really important thing. Another thing is what you talked about,so I don't necessarily you know, like. Obviously, people come to a companyenjoying teams like ours to performance or the roles, but you, hopefully youknow, hope Yo, hopefully you're going to perform in that role and helping youexecute in that particular role and in winning is amazing and awesome anddefinitely a huge part of my job. I you know, I love that you know everyoneloves loves, like she just said, kicking us and taken news. Winning isgreat, but people also need to feel, like you know, like they're growing andthere's a purpose in what they're doing and for us like. We found it in likeand like helping people who, just generally become better business.People like you will cementin said this, so I want to steal it but I'll code,and he said you will learn, you will earn and you will grow up and that'swhat we try to that's the that's. The opportunity. Try to ride people andgrowing means grow as a business person. So do what are what are some of thethings that you teach? You know what are some of the things that, whenpeople join the organization, maybe you're surprised or you've learned thatthey don't know, and that when you talk about teaching them to be business,people that you know it's coming to mind for you, as you say it, that theseare the some of the lessons that we impart, because people don't come intothe organization with that knowledge sure so some of it's really simple andit can be, it can be folded into transparency practices that people haveright so like we try to make people understand like not justwhat their job isn't, what their team...

...does, but what other teams do and whythose things are important and what other organizations in Confis do andwhy those things are important. What crunch bases overall strategy is whythat is the right strategy. What the questions are that may be are uncertainthat we have on certainty on the respect to actually getting thatstrategy. How that fits in the broader market, like these are things we talkabout a lot on the team, so just having that higher level view is one aspect ofit like. Where is what I do fit into the big picture, who are all the otherplayers and why are they doing? What they are doing is something that'sthat's ever present in our conversations and in even like you know,we are kid of clear path, conversation with an a e earlier this morning. Wemake that part of their career path, so not just it posed them to it, but butrequire them to demonstrate that they're that they're picking up onthese things and applying it and the not only the context we probot, weteach them in it, but applying in to other contexts. It's also this kind ofblend a kind of transitions into like selling. Like one of the things I tellmy sales team is, you should understand the business of your prospect verydeeply more than you should like inside some cases more than you should evenunderstand the person he your pocas, because if you don't know about thatcompany, you don't know about their industry the trends in the industry whothey compete with, how they're doing personally with that person that has anentity within that space, are they growing at Theyr, shrinking if they'regoing? Why are they growing? What are the challenges theyre facing if you'reable to to even poke a little bit at that all of a sudden the person on theother side of the you know other side of the zoom call? I guess these days,you know busy in a different light right, you're, not someone who's, justtrying to who just knock on my door. If you will an it's trying to pitch mesomething you have some level of hopefully serious understanding of whatI'm going through. Well, my we're Goin my company's going through and if I'mactually situated to get value from the thing you're trying to sell to me hidethat is as as being good business right like that. Those of those are companies.You want to do that yourdoes, it come...

...as you want to do business with, andthey should want to do business with you. So then your job is a salespersonis simply to connect those dots which is a way that ar perspective, in myopinion, to approach a sales process. I love it. One of the things that you'vementioned is you think that objection handling means you've already lost toexplain because that's a pretty controversial statement, which is greatfor podcast fodder. But what do you mean when you say that? And you knowwhat should people do instead yeah? It is a little bit. It's definitely adramatic statement and I certainly like we do buzz need a headline. How so itis a I forget when I first said, I think Iset it out in all hands just to get people to listen to me, because I thinkI was in a SASPORTAS. I was being boring and I recognized I was beingboring. So I let me throw this out there and seewhat people see what happens so, of course, just to level set like yes,like you do have to you have to r your team to handle objections. That is not.That is not what I'm saying at all. I E we have that we do it a crunch base. Ithink that's a good thing to do, but the you're immediately underminding,the suggestion should be very base line, simple things right. You objection,handle a lower level question or problem or issue like you know, youhave a kills to deal with a competitor. For example, you know I'm going to go.That's why as he competitive yours? Yes, you objection handle that, but what Ireally mean by that is is creating context for your success through all of the interactions you'rehaving with potential prospect. If you are thinking, if you so using the theexample, I just gave about understanding a company, if youunderstand a company deeply and you know or believe I guessthat they are situated well to buy it from you and that they will get valuefrom this. You can set contact. Some people call it control the message, butyou can set context through your engagement with that prospect, so thatthat that is the...

...the tone of the conversation is alreadythere like. You, don't have to objection, handle anything and turnlike all those things about. Well, I don't know this is a you know a need tohave, and this might be a nice to have. You should already know that right, ifyour objection handling need to have versus nice to have you've lost, you should be approaching prospectsfrom the perspective and have a plan in place for it's immediate up front rightnow, you we are a need to have, and you know that prospect and we're going totalk, we're going to we're going to talk about things from that perspective,and that comes from preparing and understanding the account. It comesfrom understanding your product super. Well right, that's the only part ofcreating contact recess. You really have understand your product understaying all the different US cases understand how different personas Imeaning and use personas might be interacting if you're police and whatthey're doing what they like, what they don't like right. So when you approachyour prospect, you've very much like you have sort of you have a very nowlike agile, set of frameworks and sets of conversation lines. If you will inyour in your head or hopefully documented in front of you said nomatter what direction this conversation goes, you are not handling objectionbeing being pushed toward you. You are more directing a conversation andwhatever context gets raised, you can still move forward in that context andthat's why I like, if you do that right, you actually, you will probably neverget so any serious objections you have to handle. You will just continuallynavigate different contexts and worst case, and you might. I had an impassbut worst case that impassable believe. Well, let's just talk again because weneed to think about some things, and so your point really is exactly to yourpoint. If, if you are handling those objections, it means you didn't preparewell enough at the outset and didn't control the conversation from thebeginning and now you're back pedaling. Did I at right? That's right! How didyou learn like how did you create? How did all of that crystallize for you,because I mean? Is it that you took you...

...know, training through force managementor something like that or is it just were repetition, because I think it's ait's a fairly sophisticated perspective on selling a lot of people are justcompletely focused on the right type of sales person or just running the rightsales process, but not really on preparation, context and understanding.How did you develop these ideas, or did they just come to over the years ofexperience, yeah good question so part of it is it's a blend of things that,like just obviously pining just pulling for my different experiences, so anelement of this, for example, is being able to plan a head so no matter whatthis Proseman er? What direction this conversation goes, I have, I canintroduce a beach head from which I can take things forward right, and thatcomes from literally just contingency planning right. That's very simpleright like if you just say like okay, I'm going to play through this scenario.How is this calling me or how this meeting going to go here in thedifferent directions that can go and I'm going to create? Each of thisCanaris I'm going to have a plan for each of this norses. That is somethingreally like a very basic element of like deal structuring deal makingbusiness development. So I got some of that training. You know when I was acool doing bed, but you can apply that to a sales context. It all of a suddengets gets pretty it. It makes sense and it gets really powerful and when, whenapplied to that, the approach of creating context for a success makes a lot of sense. No we're almostat the end of our time together, and one of the things we like to do at theend is get a sense for your influences, people or ideas or books. It's reallyanything you want us to know. You know your recommended list, it's one or twoideas: Things: People, human beings that have had particular influence onyou that you want us to know about, so that we can follow the bread, cum trailand pay it forward a little bit when you think about people that have had areally big impact on you or people that you think we should know about whocomes to mind. Oh Wow, a good question. So there are a lot of people that havehelped me and along the way and I'm in...

...a rifle. So there you know I'd beremiss to just say like, like some of this isn't going to be relevant here:Autis, because there's a lot of people just like my family, you know, like myparents, like I m, not going to get on this podcast, but one day we get to t obeer I'll, tell you a story of like well my mom and dad did how they likehow they came to be here in the challenges they had right. So likethings like that motivated me, I think there's lots of people that have thosestories about their families too, when I think about public personas, the sons,nuts, but then not simple in a sense like very obvious, but I just gave youa coke from seed jobs, commencement address and not connecting the dots.There are things like that that for that, if you, if you read about him inthe really days that I think are really valuable and they ave helped me- and itsounds- it sounds like a cop out to say to jobs. I think a lot of people saythings like that, but I really have like I read: I've read it bout his life.I ness don't. I know he has lots of lost and s things like that, but thereare really discreet things that he did. That I think are super valuable andthere are other folks like that out there, that I'm trying to think of thetop of my at other folks that I can't think that kind of got me on the spot,because I wasn't I'm sorry. I was all right thinking about other people here completely concidit yeah, I mean that's. Okay, stave jobsis a good answer and- and it's not irrelevant to say your parents, becausethey you know, I would the first person I typically mentioned- is my mom. Ilove my dad too. I love them, but my mom as a special as a special placeand just in terms of her work ethic and her discipline, and I will I will now that I have a quicksecond thank you for giving me this space to day, O o on a ies awesome.That was awesome that I read a lot of Redalli there's a book. He he wrotethat's very popular called principles. I think like that. That is a book Iwould recommend reading. I think I...

...think that's pretty cool and then thisisn't his isn't really not necessarily a person per se butlike there're a lot of post this, but there are a few folks that they're thatpractice, a thing called mindfulness and I think that's a really importantthing. Do we go, I search on mindfulness, mindful this meditation.My mindfulness aware, like behavior and just learning about that and trying to applyto my both my personal professional life, has helped me a lot mine too Neil.If folks are listening and they want to get in touch with you, maybe they wantto work for you. Maybe they want to buy some crunch base. What's your prefermyth of communication? How should people reach out to you send a messageon linked in the easiest simplest place. Awesome thanks so much for joining us,we're going to talk to on Friday for Friday fundamentals and thank you forbeing our guests on the sale take of podcast thanks a was great to be herappreciate everyone, it's Sam, Jacob or listeningto Sam's corner. I really enjoyed that conversation and you tell you canreally tell that he's he's got exactly the right executive temperament thatone needs to succeed in companies these days because he's passionate andenergetic, but also calm. That's the sense that I got from in the least.Maybe I was mis reading it, but I think he's probably a great leader and cranchbase is obviously done. Fantastic work over the five years that he's beenthere. So what did we talk about that stuck out to me two things of importthat I thought were interesting and the first is really this concept that theytalked about, that sales people need to be business. People First, and I thinkI just want to underscore that. I obviously me most of you know I'm the Cof e company called Revenue Collective, and we have this thing: chief, Revanofficer, school, Cro, school and one of the first classes. We teach is thisclass that I teach called theory of enterprise value and what's the pointthat I'm making so many sales like here so many sales people, they do not havea theory of value, they don't understand, they haven't thought aboutwhat makes companies great, and I don't...

...mean how many, how much money companieshave praised. I don't mean WHO's the most famous company. I mean themechanics that make companies function, the context in which companies sit andwhat are the things that companies do in order to drive and generate value,and that's something that Neal spends time, teaching a sales team and as heas he points out what that does is it helps the sales people focus on one ofthe he didn't say it explicitly, but this is one of the things that happens.Is You focus on outcomes? You focus on business outcomes, you not products andfutures of your service because you are, you are displaying empathy, you orthinking about the world from the perspective of how businesses generatevalue, particularly your prospects. He also mentioned that just internaleducation about how the company works, why it's organized in a certainly whatthe strategy is. All of that is context and context is the thing that helps youunderstand how to make decisions when you're on your own, and so I I thinkit's just a really important point, and even at the VP sales and cro level, thereason that the teacher at zero school and revenue collective is because notenough people do know it, and you make a lot of bad decisions when you don'tunderstand fundamentally how businesses operate and you think that the only wayto go revenues to hire tons and tons of sales peak. So I thought that wasreally interesting and then I ought the point that he made about. You know whyobjectional handling he means that you've already lost is reallyinteresting, obviously not the common objections, but the thing he said is:If it's, if you're debating, need to have versus guys to have with yourprospect, you've already lost completely agree with that. It's allabout. You know he used a phrase that was popularised by force management.Commanded, the message and take control of the message: Can Man the message andthen you can control the conversation. A specific way doesn't mean talk overyour prospect. He means to have a narrative that you can leverage thatanswers, questions in advance and anticipates objections and underscoreswhy those aren't very objection so thought it was a great conversationthanks for listening, if you're, not a part of a sales actor community, I themissing out so any self professional can join the sale factory community toask questions, get immediate answers and share experiences with lifeline tobe to be self pros, jump and started a...

...discussion with more than ten thousandsales professionals, it sales hact. Of course we want to think our twosponsors linked in. Thank you Lincoln you're, a great company. We Love Youlinkin and just that they're, finding ways to connect with your bries wit tolisten consels navigator, but doesn't U sales navigator? You can learn morerequest to free demo, though you are out just remind you, O business, thatLakono for lash sales desolution, that's business, that Linkin for LashSales des Solutions. Also, of course, we always want to think out rates thenumber one sales engagement PABOR. Thank you for listening. If youwouldn't be so kind or if you would be so kind as to give us a five starreview in the iten story, please do that. We have a four point: Five, whicha non who's out there like rating podcast negatively. I don't even havetime to rate podcast at all, let alone go on there and like shit on somebody,but anyway, maybe a yeah. I maybe I made an enemy somewhere. I was justtrying to pull up the podcast and and the pitting place. Sorry for me for theaudio intrusion, but anyway the point is along the side. The point is: Pleaseus, five stars on the ICUNE store and by the way, if you'd like to get intouch with you, you can find me an like din at Linton Ford last, the word infor last Sam of Jacobs. You can email me sandwich refine Cuckoo, that's thecompany, I rember. Maybe you should join and, of course I will see you nexttime. I.

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