The Sales Hacker Podcast
The Sales Hacker Podcast

Episode · 8 months ago

161. The #1 Thing That Will Make You the Most Productive Person on Your Team w/ Mike Levy

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Overview:

Today, on the show we've got Mike Levy, who's the co-founder and CEO of TitanHouse, a platform focused on one core market — tech sales. Mike is a career salesperson, turned co-founder and CEO, and he's got a really inspiring story to share with us. We're excited to bring it to you.

What You’ll Learn

  1. How to move from contributor to leader
  2. What drives success
  3. VP of sales vs chief revenue officer vs chief executive officer
  4. Distinguishing between perseverance and a failed strategy
  5. How to assess both sales leaders and candidates
  6. A tribute to the entrepreneurial spirit

Show Agenda and Timestamps

  1. How to move from contributor to leader [6:30]
  2. What drives success [11:30]
  3. VP of sales vs chief revenue officer vs chief executive officer [17:00]
  4. Distinguishing between perseverance and a failed strategy [19:00]
  5. How to assess both sales leaders and candidates [22:30]
  6. A tribute to the entrepreneurial spirit [27:30]
  7. Sam’s Corner [31:00]


 

Hey everybody, it's Sam Jacobs.Before we jump into today's show, I've got two very special announcements for you. One, it's sales hackers birthday. Sales Hacker has been around since twothousand and thirteen, but on this day, one year ago, we became atrue sales community and have grown to nearly eighteen thousand members already. Nowany sales professional can join as a member of sales hackercom, ask questions andget fast and thoughtful answers. And the second announcement is that this very podcastjust hit one million lifetime downloads. So we're celebrating all week long and wewant to give out an exclusive prize to you are amazing listeners. To enterto win, go to the first discussion threat on sales haccercom and drop thelink to your favorite sales hacker podcast episode. Thank you so much for tuning intothe show and being a part of our community. Now let's get intoit. One, two, one, three, three, hey everybody,it's Sam Jacobs. Welcome to the Sales Haacker podcast. Today on the showwe've got Mike Levy, who's the cofounder and CEO of a really cool companycalled titanhouse. Mike's a career salesperson turned cofounder and CEO, and he's gota really inspiring story to share with us. We're excited to bring it to you. Before we do that, we want to thank our sponsors. Thefirst is outreach. Outreach has been a longtime sponsor the podcast and they justlaunched a new way to learn outreach. On outreach is the place to learnhow outreach does outreach. Learn how the team follows up with every lead andrecord time after virtual events and turns those people into customers. You can allto see how outreach runs, account based plays, managers, reps and somuch more using their very own sales engagement platform. Everything is back by databold from outreach processes and customer base. When you're done, you'll be ableto do it as well as they do. Had to outreach. That I aforward slash on outreach to see what they've got going on. Our secondsponsor is proposed of by most businesses. Measure and optimize every part of thesales process, except the most critical part, right before a prospect agrees to buyand hands over their money. You wouldn't send leads through your marketing sitewithout tracking an analytics. Right. So, are you still in the dark aboutwhat happens in your sales process after your rep sent a proposal? DiscoverProposal Fi, the proposal software that gives...

...you control an insight into the mostimportant stage of your sales process, the clothes. And speaking of the clothes, propose of five proposals close at double the industry standard rate. Sign upfor a free trial or book a demo at propose a FYCOM forward slash salesacker. And without further ado, let's listen to my conversation with Mike leavy.Hey, everybody, it's Sam Jacobs. Welcome to the salesacker podcast. Todayon the show we're super excited to have Mike leavy. Mike is the COfounder and CEO of a really interesting company called Titan House. Let me readyou as by and then we're going to dive into learn all about titanhouse andalso all of Mike's background as both as sales contributor and individual contributor, asan acount executive and as a sales leader, and some of the big bets thathe's made in his career an entrepreneur. heark. Mike has dedicated his careerto building businesses. Mike started his first business when he was twenty twoand then spent eighteen years helping build two very successful SASS companies. As theCEO of Tightenhouse, Mike Is Responsible for overall strategy. Prior to Titanhouse,Mike was the cro at ranking solutions, where he was responsible for the clientfacing business. As an original investor and member the executive team, might helpbuild and guide ranking from Beta to two very successful pexits. Prior to ranking, Mike was a vice president of sales for I priyo. When he's notbuilding businesses, he's got time with his kids, two daughters, his wifeand his Golden Retriever, Mike. Welcome to the show. Thanks Sam.Really appreciate you having me on and looking forward to the conversation here. Whilewe're excited to have you. So let's start with a week. We liketo start with a little bit of a baseball card and really it's an opportunityfor you to tell us what titanhouse does. So you're the cofounder and CEOS,but a CEO. But what is titanhouse? Sure, so tightanhouse isa platform that is focused on one core market and that is tech sales,and so our premise is to build a platform that connects the dots between techsales hiring managers and the rep themselves,...

...and so we want to create amore efficient ecosystem that allows employers to identify, engage and hire the right reps andalso allows the reps to identify, engage in connect with the right employer. Well, that's amazing. When did you start the company? Yeah,so we start that we started working on the business back in in two thousandand eighteen and we went to market last year. We read a Beta fromSeptember two thousand and twenty through the end of the year and we took theplatform live in December, January and have had immediate success and really excited aboutour mission and the platform. And so what is what tell us about themission? Is the mission to help sales people find exactly the right job.Is that? Is that accurate? Yeah, it's twofold. It's to help salesprotect sales professionals and we're really focused on tech sales, because that's reallythe only thing that I know. But we're really focus on tech sales andin the mission is to give tech sales professionals real transparency into the positions andinto the companies, the employers, so that they can make a smart assessmentas to whether or not that's an opportunity they want to proceed with. Buton the same front, we're providing the same level of transparency and clarity forthe employer. And as a tech sales employer myself and someone who's hired hundredsof salespeople over the years, we also want to provide that clarity, youknow, that insight for the employers so that they can make a smart decisionon the right professional and if we can do that it's a better world forboth parties that. It absolutely is a better world. How big is thecompany like? You know, however you want to frame that. How manypeople? Rough Revenue Range? But what, how ever, you want to answer? Yeah, sure, so we're...

...start up. You know, we'rereally small. Everybody does everything. We've got about fifteen employees right now.It's equally divided between sales marketing. In product we've got a couple operational people, but we're all doing everything. And from a revenue perspective, again,start up. So under a million but with very lofty ambitions. Wouldn't bea startup if not. So, you know, I read your bio atthe top of the show and you've had you have this incredible background. WalkUS through. How did you get here? What's your career look like? Howdid you move from being an individual contributor to a leader in a crowand then ultimately to a founder? Tell us about that trajectory, which isyou know, that's a that could be a book unto itself, but I'masking in like a five minute question. But but, you know, howdo you want to answer that? Sure? So, you know, I lovesmall businesses, I love startup companies. I just love the the pace.I love the opportunity to contribute and have your voice heard. And so, you know, when I got out of school many, many moons ago, you know, I started in sales and I worked as an individual contributor, as an str for financial services firm. It was right, you know,when technology was really starting to kind of take hold in so I startedin internet based Kiosk business when I was really young and ran that for acouple of years. Barely made my money back, so I would call thata success. And then after that I joined a start up in DC thatwas called big do and big doe was a SASS platform way back in twothousand and I joined as an individual contributor. I was the the youngest member oftheir enterprise sales team and that was a really phenomenal experience. It wasa very successful company. Big Doe went through a bunch of different private equitytransactions. The business was sold to Ronas,...

...seuler and Stevenson, then to kkr, then the Goldman Sachs and on and on and in its latest youknow, acquisition of the businesses that acquired big do or sold SMP. Soreally a phenomenal story for that company. And so I was at big doughand when it was later renamed Ipreyo, for about seven and a half yearsand I was, if not the top producer, one of the top producersand you know, I was exploring new opportunities, but not actively, youknow, just because we were having such a great ride. In one dayI got a call from the original founder of big dough, a guy namedBill Kapner, and this is back in kind of mid two thousand and seven. I had just gotten married, I just built this house. How wasthe top producer at this company and Bill said Hey, Mike, I'm startinganother business and I'd like you to come over and take a look at itand if you like it, you can invest in it and you can helpme, you know, get it going. And that business was a company calledranking, and I went over, I took a look at the platform, I did a bunch of research on the marketplace and I decided to investevery single spare scent to my name in the business and take a leap offaith and leave Ipryo and and help bill, you know, start this company calledranking. What did ranking do? Ranking provided sales and marketing data andintelligence to technology companies. So, using very kind of aggressive research methodologies,we would go in in map out the technology infrastructure in the technology you'd sitdecisionmakers at the largest companies across the country in the beginning and then across theworld, and we would we would structure...

...that data in a platform and thensell access to it to other technology companies that were selling into these businesses.So if it was, for an example, a security vendor, a network securityvendor or a cloud security vendor, they could go into our platform andthey could research any company, any and find out exactly what they're using froma security install base. They could find out who the decision makers were,what projects they're working on, all their direct contact details. So it isessentially a road map, a sales tool in a marketing tool for for technologysales people, almost like discover or or zoom info before those companies existed.Yeah, so the so discover org was our biggest competitor. We both startedaround the same time. We sold the ranking business first to a private equityfirm called spectrum equity in two thousand and fifteen, and then in late twothousand and seventeen we sold the business to discover work through their financial sponsor,who was tea and associates. Wow, and let me ask you a questions. So we've gone a long time, you know. We're into we've gonefrom two thousand a two thousand and fifteen or seventeen in the blink of aneye. But how did you become when you join big dough? And bythe way, big doll really was the gold standard? I worked at acompany called GELOG selling to hedge funds, and we all wanted big dough accessbecause that told us all of the information about people at Hedge funds that wecouldn't find anywhere else. So you both a great product how did you becomethe youngest enterprise executive, you know, at the company? What was itthat when you think about your early success? You know obviously there's been success asan a dividual contributor, as a manager and now as an executive inleader, but what drove your original success? Yeah, that's a good question.I tell this story often and so you know when I want to interviewedfor the job at big dough I think it's just luck that I was theyoungest enterprise sales professional. I again, I big deal sell sould data intothe financial services community. When when I...

...forgot my first job out of school, I was selling financial services product. So I had a really good understandingof the financial services market place. I also understood technology from starting the kioskbusiness. So big DOE was a platform of financial services data and so itwas just a natural fit. And so, you know, I think it wasjust luck of the draw that I interviewed at this company and I hadthe exact skill set that they're looking for. But it's really interesting story. Andso when I was at big doe, again I'm a young professional. I'mtwenty five, twenty four hundred and twenty five and I'm on this team, I'm and I've got all of these senior reps who are ten, fifteenyears older than me and absolutely crushing it, and I was really kind of overwhelmedin the first couple months and I was looking at all of these individualsand about a month into the business I started to realize something and that wasthat the most productive people on my team, the most successful sales reps, thatthey didn't have any kind of supernatural power, that they didn't understand thetechnology anymore than I did, they didn't understand the market play us any betterthan I did. They made a had a little bit of, you know, experience that I didn't have, but they really didn't have anything on methat had an advantage over me. But for sure what they were doing betterthan I was was working harder. When I got into the office every morningthey were there and on the phone and working, and during the day theyseem to be working harder than I was and when I left in the afternoonthey were still there going at it. And it took me about a monthfor me to pick up on this, as you know, as a youngprofessional, but something clicked in my mind and it's competitive spirit. It's probablymore so a fear of failure, but...

...something clicked just a month or twointo the job where I said, you know what, these guys don't haveanything on me. I am going to be as good or better than them, and I made it a point to make sure that I always worked harderthan they did. And so I started getting in as early, if notearlier, than they did and I started working harder during the day and structuredmy day more effectively than they did, spent more time on the road infront of clients than they did, and then I would stay later and makesure that I was putting in the extra time. And it took a coupleyears, but I ended up being the top producer there, and that lightbulb coming on at that moment for a young professional really kind of set mycareer path, because bill again, who was the founder and CEO of bigdough, saw that work ethic, saw that drive of course, saw thatI was a, you know, a top producer, which led to himcalling me in late two thousand and seven and asking me to come over andhelp him get the ranking business off the ground. And so it's really interestinghow that one moment, that one little window set me on this path andthen a ranking, you know. You know, I started out, asyou know, it's a startups. Everybody did everything, you know, isBabe, Pre Beta, Beta, bringing it to market. Everybody did everything, and then I eventually be worked my way up and I was the VPof sales for I don't know, four years or so, and then Iwas the chief revenue officer. So again. But it was that one moment intime in two thousand that kind of set my, you know, thecourse for my career. When you think about I mean you touched on ita little bit. Maybe it's fear of failure. It's really hard to putin that amount of work, or at least I found it hard to putin that amount of work if you don't truly enjoy what you're doing. Doyou think that had something to do with it? was there did you findthat you also really love the act of selling, or was it just like, you know, sort of like a...

STOIC, kind of like Buddhist Actof discipline? You just were resolved that you know, you're just going todo it, even if you didn't like it. Yeah, I do likethe act of selling. I like working with client so I like solving theirproblems, you know, I think that's very fulfilling. But I also reallylike the startup environment that big, you know, that was big dough atthat time frame, and then later ranking and now tightan house where you're allin it together. Everybody's sleeves are rolled up, we're all, you know, dirty, doing everything, and I really love that part of it.You know, it drives me today. It drives me at ranking. Itdrive, you know, is the driver at big deal yours building something thatyou really believe in, that you believe is changing marketplace, that's allowing peopleto be more productive, and it was really kind of that belief in thebusiness and I have that same belief here at Titan House, which is,I guess, what's driving me today. You've seen the the you know,you've seen all the roles. For you, when you think about the difference thethree executive roles of VP of sales, chief of an officer and chief executiveofficer and founder, what do you think are the things that separate eachof those roles? Oh, very good question. So what separates a VPAsales, a crow and a CEO? Well, I mean obviously for justkind of the decisionmaking process. When you're a CEO or cro you're making decisionsthat are more expansive, that have a broader impact. And so you know, as a VP of sales, VPS sales, roll can take on abunch of different you know, meeting at different company these different sizes, differentindustries. But a VPS sales, in my experienced is focused on a stillfocused on maybe not an individual team but an individual part of a business.And so you're making decisions as a VP of sales for that specific unit thatyou're responsible for and then as a crow...

...with responsibility of the entire client facingbusiness, your decisions impact client success, they impact the SDR team, theyimpact operations, the impact account management, the impact field sales, and soyour your decisions have to be elevated and more thought out in more expanses.And then your two of course, as a CEO you're going up another levelbecause your decisions impact product your decisions impact marketing, your decisions impact operations acrossthe scale of the business, and so you know, I think it's justthe breath of the decisionmaking responsibility goes up a level or two for each role. Makes a lot of sense. You've talked about how you know how importantperseverance, determination, work ethic are. How do you know what's your guidefor there's a different you know, there's like perseverance and you know you keepplugging away at a problem for a very long time and ultimately see success,and then there's kind of, you know, the definition of insanity, which isdoing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result. Howcan you tell the different between sort of like perseverance and the wrong strategy?I guess like how do you how do you think about, like we justgot to keep working harder at this thing or actually, this thing isn't theright thing to do? Yeah, it's that's a you know again, anothergood question. And so I think another trait that elevates VP's of sales tocrows and crows the CEOS is the ability to have perseverance but also understand whenthey need to change. I think having very I think perseverance combined with theability to look in the mirror and say this isn't working, we need totest something differently, we need to try another angle, we need to admitthat our perseverance isn't working, is a must. have. You know,it's mandatory and so you know, I...

...think the two are exclusive from eachother. I think there's lots of leaders who are great leaders. They're greatleaders of teams. I think they're great. They're great leaders, could be ofmultiple teams, but if they don't have the ability to look themselves inthe eye and say this isn't working, we're working as hard as we've everworked, it's not working, but we need to have that same energy,that same drive, that same motivation, but focus in a different on adifferent angle that separates you know, the you know, the people that havethe ability to kind of rise to the top. I don't know if thatmakes sense. Yeah, it makes sense. It's it. The question is,it's a hard question answer. It's like, do you have a frameworkto figure out if something's working or not, like maybe super mental progress, adashboard, etcetera, etc. You know, we you can put thatin the we're doing it today at tighthouse. You know, as we're going tomarket and we're feeling out new markets as a startup, we're definitely testingemail messages, we're testing cadences with with our automation tools, we're testing alltypes of different things. In different markets and different industries, different size clients, etc. And so you definitely can dashboard it out and I think thedate is really important, especially when you get a little bit bigger than whatwhere we're at today. But you know, for me it's just a feel ofat this stage it's a feel of hey, you know, we're notseeing the progress as quickly as we should be. Let's test a different messagein doing that, in the ability to make those decisions quickly, are reallywhen you hear that time and time again, you know fail fast, especially ina startup, and it's really true. But that doesn't impact your perseverance.Right, you're just you just have the ability to know that you're wrongand be okay with knowing you're wrong in taking another direction quickly. It addsa great point and that that is the...

...heart and I guess in some waysit's the perseverance is really around. This is a journey, this is amarathon. This is something we're going to accomplish over a very long time.We're going to make lots of mistakes on the way, but let's maintain ourmotivation in our focus as we go. For sure nobody's made more mistakes thanI have over the years, but it's to but it's the drive, youknow, the ultimate drive that keeps you keep you, keeps you marching downthe path. One last topic before before I want to ask you is about, you know, some of your influences and some of the people you thinkwe should know about. But one thing that I think is interesting, asyou've said, that most sales leaders do a poor job assessing candidates and youactually believe that candidates do an equally terrible job assessing sales leaders. Tell usa little bit about that perspective and what's your suggested solution? Maybe maybe it'susing titanhouse, but how do you think about that? So let's talk aboutthe sales leaders first and their their ability to assess candidates. I think thatsales leaders, I think there's a bunch of issues with the way sales leadersgo about sourcing and assessing candidates. I think one of the biggest issues thatsales leaders struggle with today is that they don't have a clear and open communicationchannel to their talent or sourcing teams or HR if they're even fortunate enough tohave those individuals. You know, some companies are just too small and aredoing it themselves, like I've done for years. But I see it timeand time again where I'm talking to HR talent leaders and they don't really understandwhat good looks like. And that's on the sales leaders. You know,the sales leaders have a responsibility to communicate effectively to their talent sourcing teams tolet them have very clear parameters of what good looks like for their Reps.in good doesn't look the same for every role, in every responsibility, everyposition right good can look completely different on a field ae versus, you know, an inside wrap or an SDR or...

...an account manager, and so it'sup to the sales leaders to make sure that their talent teams have the informationthey need to get them to the right people. So that's, you know, just one, you know, one bullet there. I also believe thatsales leaders spend way too much time determining who they want to move forward within an interview process based on information on a resume. In my experience,resumes are one hundred percent inconsistent and they are all structured differently, and soas a leader who's trying to you know, you get a stack of resumes fromyour talent team or if you're doing it yourself, you get even abigger stack resumes and you're reading Enthusiz the resumes and you're trying to determine whoyou want to move forward with, and that in itself is a broken processbecause, again, that data is not structured. In every resume that they'relooking at, I promise is structure differently and inconsistent. So how do youdetermine, how do you use that information to determine who you want to moveforward with? Because we're all pressed for time. As a sales leader,we're doing a million different things we'd much rather be working on with reps ormoving deals forward, but yet here we are looking at resumes. We hateit, and so that's a broken process. And for sure in my career overthe years, and I've hired hundreds of salespeople. Again, I've interviewedthousands, I for sure have made decisions to move forward with people I shouldn'thave and for sure I've missed rock star candidates that could have been unbelievable contributorsto my team based on resume and that's broken. It's just broken. Andso that's a that's a huge problem. I think that saleswaters face and it'syou know, it's it's part of the job. You know, you're sobusy and you're moving in a million different miles a minute and the next thingyou know you're looking at these resumes and you know you've got that open headcount and the quotas accumulating daily, and so, you know, it addsan extra sense of urgency and I just...

...again I think it's a broken process. Part of the reason I built the system, you know, is tocreate more efficiency and more effectiveness around that process, to help sales leaders getto the right people really quickly and have the information that they needed at theirfingertips structured in a format that they can consume. Makes makes a lot ofsense. And then, therefore, the reps, you know, for therep reps, generally speaking, do a horrible, too horrible job assessing thesales leaders in the company. You know, when a rep gets into an interviewprocess, my experience is that they often fail to ask the heavy hittingquestions, the underlying questions that determine fit and really kind of dig into theposition, the flow of the position, the leadership style of that of theperson you're working for, you know, and often they're not even talking tothat person until the end of the interview and at that point they just wantthe job. You know, I've been through three or four interviews. I'vespent ten hours of my life. I really want this job now. I'mnot going to ask this this leader, all these heavy hitting questions. Ijust want them to like me. And so often because they don't ask thosequestions. You know, it leads to poor decisions on opportunities that are justbad fits. And then you see it in their resumes. You know,you see it in there, in their profiles, where they've got six monthshere and ten months there in a year and a half over there. It'snot because there are poor seller or a bad corporate citizen, it's because ofyou know, as a bad decision, bad choice. Makes a lot ofsense. Mike, we were roughly at the time of end of our timetogether, but one of the things we do like to do is figure outwho your influences are. When you think about great books you've read, peoplethat have really had a big impact on you, people that you think weshould know about. WHO COMES TO MIND? Well, yeah, I don't knowif this is appropriate or not, but I'll tell you about bill andso I mentioned Bill Kapner, was the founder of big dough and he wasalso the founder of ranking and he was...

...my cofounder here at titanhouse. Unfortunately, Bill passed away a couple months ago and again, I'm not sure ifthis is appropriate or not, but it's appropriate and I'm so sorry to hearthat. Yeah, I appreciate that. Bill fall a really courageous battle againsta disease that there was no cure for, als a debilitating, you know disease, and he went at it with everything he had, just like hedid when he was building, you know, those two companies. And so,you know, if I don't talk about bill now, then when wouldi? And so, I mean he was a visionary. He really hadthat entrepreneur spirit in the ability to have a presence that people wanted to rallyaround and was able to build really great teams around him that all had,you know, tremendous drive, in belief in the vision of his companies,in his businesses, and you know, he was just a tremendous influence,I'll all across the board, from an individual contributor to leadership to the wayhe dealt with his employees, the cultures that he would facilitate within the businesses, the loyal following amongst his clients. You know, big dough, andthen ranking people are are rabbit, big do fans and they still know thethe the business and that crazy low go in. The same thing with ranking. And so you know I have to, I obviously have to talk about billas being the biggest influence in my professional career. For sure inspiring wordsand sorry that, you know, I never got a chance to meet hima course or our listeners, but it's an incredible accomplishment the companies that hebuilt and I love the legacy that he left behind in you as a asa founder and Seeo and entrepreneur. Mike. If folks want to get in touchwith you, maybe their salespeoople, they want to learn more about tightenhouse, maybe they want to work for...

...you, maybe they want to justpick your brain. What's the best way to get in touch with you?Yeah, they can. They can call me. They can call me directly, they can email me. My email is m leavy ll evey at titanhousecom. They can find me on Linkedin and connect with me on Linkedin. Ihave conversations with reps every day who are coming into our platform that are lookingfor great opportunities and and I always, always take time to talk to repsif I can help. You know a rep land a great job. What'scooler than that? So yeah, contact me directly, email M Levi attighten housecom or or hit me up on Linkedin. Happy to talk to anyone. Sounds Great, Mike, will talk to you on Friday for Friday fundamentals. But thanks so much for being a guest on the salesacer podcast. Reallyappreciate you having me. Everyone, Sam Jacobs, Sam's corner. Great Conversationwith Mike Leeve. Really enjoy talking to him. Inspiring story, and Ilove that story about, you know, the the light bulb that went offwhen he had first joined big dough, now called iprio, and he said, what's the difference between me and all these other folks that are fifteen yearsmy senior? And the answer is work, ethic and motivation. Now, Ithink sometimes, as I mentioned, and asking him, you know,it's hard to work hard at something that you hate doing. And so howdo you find what you love that will give you the motivation and inspiration toreally to work as hard as you can, or is that something that work ethic, that discipline, the ability to put down that drink and go tosleep so that you can wake up early and go for run and be inthe office at seven am is does that come innately? Is that something thatyou can train or develop? Mike mentioned that it comes from the culture ofthe business. If you believe in the business, if you believe in thegroup of people that you're taking this journey with, then maybe you can summonsomething that wouldn't be possible in another context. I also think feedback and seeing resultsfrom your work is probably something that...

...inspires you, motivates you and helpsyou develop that work ethic and and that purpose in that drive. But Ireally liked it. The second thing just to point out is, you knowhow many people make bad hiring decisions based on relying on resume is not reallydeveloping a proper assessment for candidates and for candidates and as you as a salesperson, not developing a framework for how to think about evaluate not just the companybut the potential manager, the leader will kind of management stuff. How dothey have how do they treat their people? How do they work with their peoplewhat kind of one on ones wall you have. So all of thatwas was really useful insight and context from Mike. So I loved it.Now, if you're part of the if you're not a part of the salesackercommunity yet, you're missing out. Any sales professional can joint as a memberto ask questions, get a mediated answers and share experiences with likeminded be tobsales pros. Jump in and start a discussion with more than tenzero sales professionalsat sales hackercom. Of course we want to thank propose a FY most businessesmeasuring and optimizing every part of the sales process except the critical one. Rememberthat propose a FI proposals close at double the industry standard rate. So makesure your proposals are up to snuff by using propose a FI. Sign upfor a free trial, a book, a demo. Propose a fight coomsforwards our salesacer. Of course, we always want to thank outreach. Ifyou haven't given us five stars on the on the itunes store, please doso. If you have an applied or consider joining revenue collective, take alook at revenue collectivecom. If you're an associate earlier in your career. We'vegot an incredible suite of training programs to help up. Love you, inaddition to the ability to help you get any question answered within seconds through thepeer to peer learning framework that we've developed. If you want to follow up withme, email me Sam at Revenue Collectivecom or find me on Linkedin atLinkedincom. Slash the word in Sam F Jacobs. See you next time.

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