The Sales Hacker Podcast
The Sales Hacker Podcast

Episode · 1 month ago

Return to Work: Offering the Maximum Flexible Option

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode of the Sales Hacker Podcast, we have Gianna Scorsone, GM/Head of North America at Aircall, where she lives out her dream to scale the channel program and to empower diverse employees and leaders. Join us for a rich conversation about answering to your employees and hearing their need for flexible return-to-work options.

What You’ll Learn

  1. Servant leadership means listening to your people
  2. Culture changes with every person who joins the team
  3. How to provide compete return-to-work flexibility
  4. Revising policies to support mental health

Show Agenda and Timestamps

  1. About Gianna Scorsone & Aircall [2:00]
  2. Gianna’s origin story in sales [4:50]
  3. How Aircall tackles the return to work [11:15]
  4. Supporting mental health with flexible policies [16:40]
  5. Building a culture that drives business outcomes [20:30]
  6. Paying it forward [24:20]
  7. Sam’s Corner [27:30]

One two one: Three: Three: Everybody atSam Jacobs, welcome to the Sales Hacker podcast today in the show we've gotJohn A scoone. She is the general manager and the head of North Americafor air call. Er Call is one of the fastest growing companies out there.They are a cloud based phone system. We use them here, a pavilion and it's agreat conversation about building culture about returning to work and howto think about doing it and air calls on it in a really thoughtful way, andalso just on her background and why retail sales can be an excellentincredible launching ground for sales leaders like John, so it's a goodconversation before we get there and we want to think our sponsors. We've gotthree for the show. The first is out reach out reach, as we know, has been along time sponsor the podcast. They are excited to announce their new annualseries. The unly summit series, its back this here seem, is the rise ofrevene. Innovators joined the new cohort of leaders who put buyers at thecenter of their sale strategies to drive a fish and predictable growthacross the entire revenue cycle, get more details and save your spot. Thatsummit that out reached a Ao were also brought you by pavilion. Pavilion isthe key to getting more out of your career. Our private membership givesyou access to thousands of like minded peers, dozens of courses in schoolsthrough pavilliard and over one thousand workbooks template scripts andplay books to accelerate your development. Pavilion members get hiredmore quickly, are paid more and get promoted more rapidly than their peersunlock the career of your dreams. BY APPLYING TO DAY AT JOINT PAVILION COMand finally Konga as doing business becomes increasingly complex, it getsharder to do it well. Businesses often sacrifice agility and lose sight of thecustomer experience, Congo's expertise and comprehensive solution, sweet forcommercial operations, transforming the documents and processes surroundingcustomer engagement, C, PQ and C L M help. Businesses meet customer needs,while increasing agility to adapt to change check them out at Konga forward.Slash sail soccer now, Lys, listen! My conversation with John E Scorsonera Ody,its Sam Jacobs, welcome to the Sales...

Hacker podcast today on the show wereexcited to have Jona scorso Ne Jona is the general manager and head of NorthAmerica at Ercall. She works to empower employes, while overseeing departmentsthat cover the customer journey spectrum from Lee Generation topartnerships and integrations in less than a year than John has been atErcall. She scaled the company's channel program built relationshipswith current and potential channel partners, made a number of key hiers,including a VP of channel sales and has grown the leadership team from withinfor six female and people of Color Promotions, which is amazing, she's.Also a sponsor of air calls LGBTQ. I plus Erg Queer Call Jona welcome to theshow, thanks to much SAM, we're excited to have you so. The first thing we liketo do is your what we call your baseball card, which is just a quicksummary of you, but also the company. So My Company pavilion is a customerVarca. Many people are, but there are a few folks out there that don't know whoor what air call does so in your work tell us what is our called. Do Air Callis a soft phone system fully cloud based specifically for this seas, space,meaning you know anyone who's, really customer facing who would like to haveinsight cards and visibility and past conversations and all of those greatthings to deliver great customer service utilizes and benefits from aircall amazing, and how- and so I think I read it, but how long have you been atthe company? I have been at the company for one year and one week. Oh Amazing!Congratulations on your one year anniversary! Thank you very much. It'sbeen epic sounds like it if I'm not mistakentheir calls sort of like on an Ip path, so so pretty exciting. So and yourtitle in GM head of North America, but just give us you know, formerly whatare your responsibilities just you? So we understand the scope. I read alittle bit about it, but we love to hear in your work yeah absolutely soit's really following the customer journey from acquisition all the waythrough you know keeping them happy. That means that it's the lead, Gen anddevane teams, your traditional Sdr,...

Bedr's and then your you know moreindirect routes where we have the IDC team. That's the it distributionchannel that traditionally called master agents, I'm also in charge ofthe partnerships team which aligns with our core integration partners as wellas direct channel. That's the you know, partners within the integrationecosystem and then the as of the closers and then, of course, all theway through setting up our customers for success, the on boarding team andthe customer success team who are revenue driving as well, and so theyare not only in charge of making sure that our customers have the bestexperience, and that translates to r attention, but also through expansionwith cross Ellan amsel amazing. So, let's, let's learn a little bit aboutyour background. How did you what's your origin story? How did you,obviously at the end of it, we want to know how you discovered Air Calbo.What's your background, how did you get into sales and kind of revenuemanagement, and, and where did you D develop your expertise? Absolutely so,let's start away way back. My first sales role was when I was probably sixyears old, my brother sister and I had a metal soddering kit. Now I know oneprobably shouldn't have that at the age of six, but it was the s in New YorkCity that was fine and we used to we used to melt as the safest thing youcan be so super safe, say: I'm super safe. I never hurt myself I'll, tellyou that we used to melt coins into little sculptures little trinkets andwe hacked some space at the Second Avenue Street Fair that year and wetried to sell our trinkets, and my brother and sister gave up after a fewminutes probably, but I was determined to sell a piece we probably overchargedfor about five bucks, a pop and in the S. let me tell you that was big money,but I ended up selling one I stuck with it. I really worked on this one engagedcustomer and I got her to throw it down...

...and I'll. Never forget that thrill.That was my first sale and I was absolutely hooked. My dream at that agewas to be a hot dog lady vendor. That's on my link did and feel free to readthat story, but I always had you know my mind, set on sales and and buildingan empire, so to speak out of college. I was a marketing major and I went intoretail sales and to answer your question of you know really what taughtme and prepared me to be where I am today. I have to say it was thefundamentals of working, a flag ship store on Fifth Avenue. I was themanager on duty when the doors were open and that man, but it was expressokay, limited brand, Yep sold clothing and they were quite big at that timeand I loved it. I loved every minute of being on the floor, the energy, thebuzz it was really exciting to learn how to you know, speak to every customer at once,because time doesn't permit. You know, speaking to every single person, butyou had to do it in a way that felt really personalized and- and so youlearn the techniques of using your voice using enthusiasm, understandinghow, to you know up cell in a way that made it feel very personal, but atscale and I'd say that you know that absolutely translates into you know,leading an SDR or bdra right. How do you do cold, calling personalized, butat scale? You know what was also fundamentally groundbreaking for me interms of learning skill was all of my employees were college kids who wereincentivized to sell they weren't making commission they were making anhourly. You know minimum wage and I had to learn how to tap into theirintrinsic motivation, how to communicate a common goal so that theycould really understand the importance...

...of their contribution, the value theybrought to the table to reach that common goal. And that, of course, ishow you motivate a sales team. It goes beyond just the dollars, but reallylearning and growing and helping them understand the responsibility they haveto the people around them as well, because having one top performerdoesn't get you the scale that you need. How did you transition from expressthrough to into software sales or where there I'm sure there might beadditional steps in between yeah? There are a couple steps in between.Ultimately, I decided to take a year off and I grabbed a backpack and Itraveled the world for a year and upon return, I just sent my resume out toevery single person. I knew- and you know my resume landed in the hands of agentleman named Michael Curvin who's a mentor till this day, and he was one ofthe Co founders of Blue Wolf. BLEU was a SA sales force, consulting firm, thepremier partner, that sales force ever had, and we also had an it staffingdivision within Blue Wolf as well. We did incredibly well fast growth yearover year and we really had two business lines within the one and weoffshoot the IT staffing arm to name it Mondo and added digital marketing,staffing tod as well, and we brought both of those companies to transaction,and I stayed on through acquisition of Mondo for a few months and decided thatI really like the start up and buildup mode, and so I left took a year off andI started consulting. I started coaching and I thought it was you knowtime and I had the privilege to be able to do that at that point and I was setto have a little bit of a more relaxed life and then I got a call from arecruiter about air call, and here I am amazing- it's been the biggest surpriseabout this opportunity, the biggest surprise in no that's a fantasticquestion that you know I did my due diligence and I did research aircall and I loved lovedloved what I saw right. Managing sales...

...teams before you know this tool made somuch sense. The biggest surprise for me, though, was yes, it's a phone systemwe're actually not just a SASS product, but we're also in the telecom space, sothat learning curve was one that I didn't quite anticipate and so yeah. Iwould say that was the shock. What are the complexit is associated with beingin a telcom space just dealing with these archaic or old legacy providers.Things like that yeah sure there's. You know, of course, a legacy providers,but there's also just the nuances of being in the telecom space, thecompliance issues that go around with it that are very specific to thetelecom space. I think that some of the channels that traditionally sellindirect channels at that Telcom sells through are more used to those legacysystems, and so there's a lot of education involved around a system likeours where, for me, coming from the SASS space, it was like yeah. This is ano brainer and so that that was really interesting for me as well, and thenreally just learning kind of the history and the evolution of TelcomAmazing. Well, one of the things we want us to talk about today was justit's in the headlines. A Lot, and certainly a lot of people are talkingabout this concept of return to work, and, what's that then, and like you know, are we goingto be in the office? Are we going to work from home? Is there going to be ahybrid environment and then how do you manage teams? How do you ensure that,as you navigate this complex, hybrid environment, that people feel included,they feel productive? They understand what's happening in the company. Sowhat's your what's your approach, because I know that it's a andcertainly I'm sure air call plays a role because you're a soft phone system,a cloud based phone system, so you enable people that are remote teams toaccess. You know one single platform so that they can talk to their customers.But how are you approaching you know? The concept of returning to the officeis er call returning o the office. How do you? What are the policies that youall are developing to make sure that the company feels cohesive, even whenyou're flung all the way around the...

...world? Yeah? That's a great questionsalmon and couldn't agree more that it's so relevant today, and you know Isay this a lot and and you're right. You Know Air Call. Is there to supportorganizations grapple with this? You know new era of workforce. You not onlyhave to be flexible in terms of being able to be hybrid, but you have to behybrid in office and fully remote all at the same time, because it's veryrare for an organization to be solely one of those things and, as youmentioned, that's where Ercall can really support being all of those atonce and that's what we've experienced here with our own internal team. Youknow one thing that I think that you miss that I'd like to bring up is notonly you know, how do you make people feel included and drive theproductivity while you have some being remote, some being in office, butthere's also, how do you make people feel safe and how do you care formental wellness all in the process, because things are changing so rapidlyconditions are changing statistics around coved or changing it's somethingthat needs to be top of mine all of the time. What was comfortable for someoneyesterday may not be comfortable for them today, and so it's really askingthose questions. It's checking in with people, and it's you know sending outfrequent surveys to make sure that everyone continues to feel safe.Additionally, it's making sure people understand that they can change theirmind right now now, in order to do that and be successful and continue theproductivity that you mentioned, it's really important for people to haveroutine. So what we've done here at Arica? We have reopened our New YorkCity office, so I'll speak for North America, we've required vaccines forthe office and people don't wear masks here, though, if they travel, peopleare frequently getting ovid tests to make sure that you know we'refrequently rechecking in despite vaccines to make sure you know breakthrough cases don't spill over. We found that this has been reallysuccessful for us for people to be very...

...comfortable here and it's amazing todaythe floor is packed, the energy is buzzing and you can absolutely seepeople thriving now. That said, we've decided to be a hybrid model, so peoplehave the option of working three days a week in office two days a week fromhome and the reason why we have done that and had a set schedule, we're allin the office on Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays is because we want to breedthat collaboration that being an office provides. Additionally, it also talksabout that routine. That I mentioned right. It's knowing your exact scheduleso that on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, you're mentally prepared- and you know,you're- set up for success because you know that you're going to be at home.This avoids the situations where, like I'm running a little bit later, Oh, Iimpress news a couple more times. Maybe I'll just stay at home. That ambiguitycan be counterproductive and it can be hard for others to know your scheduleas well. So I think that that's how we've really been able to tackle thishybrid model here in then New York City office. Now, in terms of remote, wemake sure that you know everything we offer to in house folk remote folk alsoget as well. We also made sure that everyone feels comfortable to be fullyremote if they want to. And lastly- and this is such a great tip when doingzoom meetings- and you have half you know the zoom participants, let's sayor the meeting participants in the office and the half our remote, we haveeveryone open their computer and join zoom, so that everyone has a thumb,nail picture to make sure that it's not just one image with these tiny headsthat you can't really see, and you can't really hear and that levels theplaying field for those that are out of office as well. I love that when youtalked about well first question for you, so what about folks that, becauseyou know these requirements is and sort of the evolution of the science or evenlearning new things about the vaccines you know by the day whether they'reapprove for young people, what some of the sign effects are. So let's say youhave some folks that say you know what I don't want to be vaccinated. How isit all approaching that Oh yeah, we...

...have? We have a lot of great employeeswho have decided that the vaccines not for them and that's not for me todecide they have their fully remote option and they are fully remote. Youknow we're doing an offsite next week. That's in person we're also going toget those same training facilitators to do a remote version so that peopledon't miss out because, as you mentioned, we need to make sure thatwe're being inclusive and allow people to feel very comfortable with theirpersonal choice. Yeah, it's it's difficult. It is difficult, so trickyso trippy. It's! I don't think, there's astraightforward, simple answer as much as I want there to be. I know I knowyou mention mental health. You know what are? How are you approaching? Areyou modifying your sick leave policies or your vacation policies for peoplethat are that are discussing or having mental health issues, or is it justbeing more mindful and checking in with people? How are you approaching that?It's both both of these things? You know we did some management training itcharged a phenomenal job of you know getting our managers together andreally putting emphasis around this teaching and guiding them how to checkin with their employees the type of questions to ask you know the behaviors,or you know the body language to look out for, and then it's reallyencouraging people. When you see them, you know sick because of fatigue or orwhen you feel that they're a little bit drained or not doing, you know the bestthat they can because of what they're experiencing externally. We encouragethem to take some time off. I did this actually with one of my directors, Inoticed that she was just wearing fin and and I for to it, take a week off. Iforced myself to take a week off last week as well, and I look you know itgets the best of all of us right now, and so it's important that we lead byexample as well. What we've also done is hr, is you know, really tracking,because we have an open vacation policy. What that sometimes turns into ispeople don't take vacation or feel you know this pressure not to, and Icouldn't disagree with that more I'm a...

...huge advocate of making sure thatpeople take the time because of mental wellness because of that release thateveryone needs, and so we do track how much time people take vacation, notbecause we don't want them to take it but to make sure that they are takingit. What is your perspective? I'm just you know genuinely curious on. Do yougive there are times of the year, for example, if your sales person andyou're on a quarterly quota, I don't know if the sales people at er collaron monthly or quarterly, but let's say you haven't, made a sale or your tyou're tracking, to below quota, and you want to take a vacation. The lasttwo weeks of the quarter when I and it becomes clear that you're going to missthe number that sort of one scenario and then the other scenario might be.You know just like Hey October's a super busy time. Do you give guidance?Do you feel or does the organization feel, but I'm curious about youpersonally? Do you feel self conscious providing any kind of pushback orfeedback at all? When somebody says hey, I want to take a week off, and you knowyou have their dash board up in front of you, O they a say on Yeah E O. Iwould say what I'm at my best, I don't and when I'm at worst I do you know. Ithink that there are two different scenarios here right that with thefirst scenario that you gave of you know, they're not hitting quota, andthey want to take. You know the rest of the month off. What I would probably dois you know, guide their leader to to have the conversation of you know. Doyou want success? What is success mean to you? You know how do you feel thiswill translate to your overall success here and building your career, becauseI think that's more of a choice of is: is taking vacation going to help you oris it going to hurt you right and that's very personal and probably veryscenario based because in one stance it actually might really help someone?Maybe they were feeling fatigued and burnt out and that's why they weren'tperforming well and- and this will actually allow them to come back. Youknow guns a Blazin and crush quote of the next month. Right or you know,maybe they're just a bottom performer and don't care, and then that's reallya story of whether or not you know they...

...should be on the team or not. Thesecond scenario that you mentioned was you know a peak season or two weeksbefore the quarter ends. Yes, I do give guidance around that. I think you know.On top of not just you know, peak time or you know shortened months likeDecember, I think there's also making sure that we have enough coverage. Soit's looking to see how many other people are on vacation. At that sametime, distribution is really important as well makes perfect sense to me. Youknow the we've got a little bit of time left and I just do want to touch onbecause it's it. I know that you have a lot of great ideas and opinions whenyou think about building a great team, and you think about creating greatculture, which I know is really important to you, give us some somelessons or tips or strategies or your philosophy on how does somebody goabout building a great team and ensuring that there's a fantasticculture that is positive, enthusiastic passionate that drives towards thebusiness out comes to business nates? What's Your W A A E Y R? What are yourlessons man? I could talk about this all day long. I okay, I think it. Itstarts. First, with hiring you've got to hire great people super important.You know, even if you think they might be to senior in a startup environmentyou're going to need them very soon. So hire great people who have intrinsicmotivation, who are team players, and so what I say in every single interview,Sam and I hope I can curse here. But I tell every single person I interview. Ihave a no ego and no asshole policy on my team. I just won't stand for it. Ityou know is distracting and it does not breed hyper growth because they're onlyin it for themselves, and that is actually quite stunting to the business.And so, while you know we love top performers, while we love overachievers, if they have an ego or if they're an Asshole, I don't want thembecause they're going to hurt everyone around them and they're going to hurtthe culture. I think that it's also really important to think about processand culture right. How do you build both? And it's really about empoweringyour team to do so? And if you really...

...think about you know your overallpopulation within the organization, you really want to think about how muchdiversity you have and how many levels you have building the process andbuilding the culture. That's where you're going to get the best amount ofvalue, and so you know, I think, from a leadership perspective. What I'mresponsible for is making sure that we uphold our company values. What thepeople should be really driving is the culture and it's understanding thatculture is iterative. It represents the population that you have at the timeand it should always evolve as a result of it. And leadership is there toreally make sure. As I mentioned, the values stay in tact and so part of thevalues and part of my philosophy is making sure that I'm a- and I know thisis really Cliche, but I'm a people first leader number. Second, becausehow I treat my employees, how I treat our team. That's how they'll treat thecustomers right, and so it's really important to understand and recognizethat, because that's how we're going to yield the most growth together, and soit's really understanding that my role as a leader is not to report into theCEO not to report into you know the board. I tell my co this all the timeyou're, not my boss. My team is my boss. My role is to help them learn and growand show them how they contribute and value what they bring to the table sothat they want to continue to do that and do it more efficiently, moreeffectively and folding in those great hires that I spoke of to do the same.Each class should be better and better than the next and will all growtogether. That way, that's how you build a really strong culture, and soyou know when I think about what I'm graded on right. What my metric shouldbe, of course, yes, revenue right that that's, ultimately the maker break. Forme, that's from the board perspective...

...the CEO Perspective, but what I grademyself on is how many internal promotions have Ifacilitated? What is our retention? Look like. What's our engagement ratelike that's, how you build culture, those are fantastic ideas and fantasticinsights. We're almost at the end of our time together, and one of thethings that we like to do is sort of pay it forward. Where we hear aboutpeople, ideas, books, whoever your key influences are or key ideas. Whereveryou think that we should look next, if we're trying to follow the bread crumbtrail of Jon a Scorsonera, we do that. We Love Hansa, my name say it so well practiced. So what comes to mind you know who doyou think we should know about what great bosses great mentors great books?You know, what do you think we should know? Oh, I can now that's such abeautiful question and I wish I quite honestly gave it more thought. I youknow quick quick thing about me. Is I actually have a learning disability andso sometimes being on the spot? I'm not at my best, and I often forget thebooks that I read, which is really strange and really crazy, but I'velearned techniques around it, but anyhow so with that in behind andthinking on my feet here, you know, I would say actually Eric Beric to whowas the other CO founder of Blue Wolf, he's now an VP over it sales force. Youknow, he's got a great. You know customer obsessed, podcast as well. Ireally learn from him how to really focus it on vision, how todisseminate vision to motivate a team and he built a sales force practicelike I have never seen before. It was groundbreaking and really put you know,sales force consulting on the map and he, you know, continued to innovate andempower the leaders around him to really kind of create the mold of whata consulting firm should look like in the agile world and now he's very muchfocused around how blue off was...

...successful through this concept ofcustomer obsession that you know, we have Blue Wolf, adopted very, veryearly on, and I remember Blue Wolf on your right that it was one of the earlyand great sales force at Le Ibe is probably much broader than them muchbroader than now yeah. It's right! That's what now there I be a! I remember always you know when weneeded help on sales force we blew us was the first name that we thought ofso nice. You probably work with some old college. That's awesome, Yeah John! If, if folks were listening andthey want to reach out, maybe they want to connect, maybe they're, inspired bywhat you said and want to work for air call, what's the best way to get intouch with you, I love that please reach out on Linkedin. I check it often and we are absolutelyhiring for some amazing amazing rolls across the board marketing salespartnerships and we would love to have really strong and great talent weregrowing at rapid speed. Thank you for not saying exponentially people that use that phrases aren'tquite first with exponents, but fantastic and and thank you so much forbeing our guests on the show this week and we're going to talk to you onFriday for Friday fundamentals. I don't looking forward to it Sam thanks somuch. Thank you! Everybody! It's Sam Jacobs, welcome tothe sale, sacker podcast and to Sam's corner what a great conversation withJohn is cosen. I think you know a lot of it stood out, but one of theimportant things is just the emphasis in the focus on you know. She saidsomething which is actually quite controversial, and you know PatrickLanciani, who wrote the five dysfunctions of a team. I mightdisagree, but she said that her first team, her boss, is the people that sheworks. That work for her. You know her teammates, but really the people that areport to her. They are her boss. More than the CEO, Patrick Linsey would say.You know your first allegiance should...

...be to the people, your peers, at thesame reporting level, but John Disagrees and says you know what to bea true servant later. She needs to work for the people that work for her andthat means listening to them figuring out what they need, what they want andmaking modifications and changing. The other things she said, which was reallyinteresting was that you know culture is, is the collected actions andbeliefs of the people that work free today? It is not what it used to beyesterday or ten days ago or a year ago or five years ago, it's always evolvingand changing based on the New People on the people that work with you at thatmoment, which which is challenging actually because you're constantlyfinding a new dynamic and a particularly new dynamic, giveneverything that's happening, around return to work and Ercall has beenreally thoughtful about how they've done it so, as she mentioned just ifyou're taking notes and want to think about a way that you might return tothe office. First, complete flexibility right, they surveyed the team first andthey said what do you want the team said? Well, we want to make sure thatwe don't have to wear masks if we're vaccinated. We want to make sure thatother people in the office are also vaccinated and hey if I'm notvaccinated. I want to make sure that I still have an option, and so theycreated this structure where they're in the office Mondays Thursdays andFridays, and they are not so instead of everybody getting to pick and choosewhich day they come to the office as they listen. If you're going to come tothe office you're going to come on these three days, Monday, Thursday andFriday, probably so they can kick off and end the week together as a team andthen Tuesdays and Wednesday is. If you want to work from home, you can do it,then, if you're not vaccinated- and you don't want to come into work, that'syour right and you can work completely remotely and as a consequence of that,when we have meetings, everybody is going to dial in to zoom. Even if we'rein person, I would assume that they mute themselves and do some things thatthere's not you know all that feedback which can be horrible to listen to. Butthe point is that there are strategies for inclusively strategies to make surethat people feel included, even if they choose not to get a vaccine or if theydo get a vaccine, and they want to feel safe because you want to go into workand know that if you're sitting next to somebody else and everybody's breathingloudly as you're on the phone that you know, the risk of a break throughinfection through the vaccine is lower. So it's a new world that we live in andeverybody's tackling it differently,...

...but air calls been pretty creative andresourceful. I think, and it's about it's about being flexible, it's aboutsaying what are the things that we can do to make. People that are not herefeel included in the people that are here feel also okay, and how do webuild a work force in a work environment for the modern day thatsort of incorporates everything we've learned from Covin at the same timetakes us forward in a new direction, and I don't think, there's one easyanswer, but I think I think a lot of companies are challenging are tacklingthis challenge with innovation, and that's one of the things that air callsdoing so great conversation thanks Jonather coming on, if you are not partof the sales hacker community, yet you're missing out any salesprofessional can joined, jump in and started discussion with more thanseventeen thousand professionals at sales ackoom. Of course, we also wantto think our sponsors out reach. This year's only summit series is back andthe rise of the revenue. Innovators is the themes to go to summit hot outreach a Iota Glen more. You haven't taken a class through PavilionUniversity. You are missing out pavilion members, get hired morequickly, promoted more quickly and up train and up doll, upscale their skillsmore effectively. So take a look at joint pavilion so that you can takeyour career to the next level and finally, Konga Konga helps businessesmeet customer neens, while increasing agility to adapt to change check himout at Congo forward slash sales acker. If you want to reach out to me, you canLindon Com Fort Lash. The word in for slash am F Jacobs. Otherwise you canemail me salmon, joint pavillion. I talk to you next time. I.

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